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Spring 2015 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms.

For further information about the First-Year Writing Requirement, see http://social.chass.ncsu.edu/fwp/NewFrWrReq.htm.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

200-level Courses


ENG 207 - Studies in Poetry (3 credits)

ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

Representative examples of novels and short stories from different periods, emphasizing understanding and appreciation of fiction as a genre, a knowledge of the features and techniques of fiction, and a sense of the development of the genre.

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

Shakespeare for non-English majors. Seven to ten major plays, including representative comedies, such as The Taming of the Shrew; histories, such as Richard III; tragedies, such as Hamlet; and romances, such as The Tempest.Does not satisfy requirements for English major.

ENG 220 - Studies in Great Works of Western Literature (3 credits)

Readings, in English translation, of Western literary masterpieces, from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East and Europe towards the present, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, Danta, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Austen, Flaubert, Dickinson, Tolstoy, Kafka, and Woolf.Credit will not be given for both ENG/FL 220 and either ENG/FL 221 or ENG/FL 222.
   
 

ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Russian, Eastern European, Western European, Latin American, Canadian, Australian.

ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

African-American writing and its relationships to American culture and history. Covers such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Chesnutt, Dunbar, DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, and Morrison.

ENG 249 - Native American Literature (3 credits)

A survey of Native American literatures from before contact with Europeans to contemporary culture. Writers may include: Apess (Pequot), Ridge (Cherokee), Silko (Laguna Pueblo), Momaday (Kiowa), Power (Sioux) Gunn Allen (Laguna-Sioux), Harjo (Creek), and Erdrich (Anishinaabe).
   
 

ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of English literature to 1660, including Old English, Middle English, and Renaissance writing, focusing on such central authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Credit will not be given for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

Comprehensive study of various approaches to writing about film. Primary focus is on the critical and evaluative practice involved in writing film criticism for non-academic audiences. Film screenings, discussion of assigned readings, and in-classwriting workshops aid students in preparing a portfolio of film writing that includes film reviews of various lengths.

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

300-level Courses


ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

Ora Gelley
Ora Gelley
 
Starting virtually with the birth of the movies, there exists a long history of adapting a variety of kinds of texts–plays, parables, novels, stories, etc–into films. No single “formula” or “theory” of adaptation exists. Rather, the work of adaptation involves a process of translation and transformation, a process which this course will explore. Our study of this process will force us to consider the form or genre of the original source text. In order, for instance, to gain some understanding of Pier Paolo Pasolini’s film (from 1967) based on Sophocles’ play Oedipus Rex, for instance, we must consider not one but three source texts: the Oedipus tale of Greek myth and drama, Sigmund Freud’s interpretation of that tale, and finally, a modern story based on Pasolini’s own autobiography which frames the mythic recreation of the film. In the case of Lars Von Trier’s The Five Obstructions (2003), to give another example, we will explore the process by which a filmmaker, in collaboration with his colleague, re-makes, in five entirely different versions, a short film produced by him 25 years earlier. In this case, the transformation does not involve a  shift from text to screen, but rather, is driven by a series of “obstructions” (devised by the student, Von Trier, for his former film teacher, Jorgen Leth) which determine the form of each re-make. The course will cover a range of textual forms and cinematic and literary genres–including Greek tragedy, the Female Gothic, the novel, the biblical text, the short story,  and the animated film. Issues, in addition to those of genre and adaptation, that will be discussed include: intertextuality; point of view (how, for instance, is the subjective or “first person” voice expressed differently in film and literature?); narrative and narration; historiography.

400-level Courses


ENG 487 - Shakespeare, The Later Plays (3 credits)

Brian Blackley

Shakespeare's major later works with emphasis on tragedy and romance. Assignments will include in-class reports, two exams, and an essay.

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (1-6 credits)

500-level Courses


ENG 558 - Studies In Shakespeare (3 credits)

Brian Blackley

Offered in Summer Session I. Shakespeare's major works before 1600, focusing on his comedies and histories, and examining how Shakespeare's texts take meaning in performance.  Plays to include Taming of the Shrew, Merchant of Venice, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, As You Like It, I Henry IV, and Henry V. Quizzes, two tests, presentation, and paper.

600-level Courses


ENG 636 - Directed Readings (1-6 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

ENG 636 provides directed study in areas of special interest that are not addressed in the department's regular course offerings.  See the grad programs website for information about proposing an independent study: http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/graduate/current_students/directed_readings.php.

ENG 695 - Master's Thesis Research (1-9 credits)

ENG 699 - Master's Thesis Preparation (1-3 credits)

CRD

800-level Courses


CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

CRD 895 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9 credits)

CRD 899 - Doctoral Dissertation Preparation (1-3 credits)