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Fall 2014 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 100 - Introduction to Academic Writing (4 credits)

Intensive introduction to critical writing and reading in academic contexts. Exploration of writing processes and academic literacy skills: interpreting assignments; comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating college-level texts;  inventing, drafting, and revising; seeking, providing, and responding to constructive feedback; collaborating effectively under varied learning models. Extensive writing practice and individualized coaching. Attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Intended as preparation for ENG 101. All sections meet in computer classrooms.

ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms.

For further information about the First-Year Writing Requirement, see http://social.chass.ncsu.edu/fwp/NewFrWrReq.htm.

200-level Courses


ENG 201 - Writing Literary Analysis (3 credits)

Writing about literature for a variety of audiences. Strategies for writing close textual analysis - including attention to versification, narrative technique, and dramatic structure - and for articulating biographical, literary-historical, and cultural-historical contexts. Conventional genres of literary analysis, including "close readings," reviews, and editorial introductions; conventions of organization and prose style in both academic and professional literary discourse; MLA conventions for prose style and documentation.
   

ENG 207 - Studies in Poetry (3 credits)

Thomas D Lisk

Main features of poetry such as tone, voice, form, diction, figurative language, and sound patterns. Reading of poetry from different periods with the goal of learning how to understand, appreciate, and analyze different kinds of poems.

 

 

ENG 207 Studies in Poetry-Spring 2015

Instructor: Tom Lisk

REQUIRED TEXT:

Helen Vendler, Poems, Poets, Poetry, Third Edition

COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course you will read, discuss and write about poetry as a form of oral and written communication. The readings will help you gain a technical appreciation of poems as artistic unities of form and content, emotion and idea, language and knowledge, sound and sense. 

ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

Representative examples of novels and short stories from different periods, emphasizing understanding and appreciation of fiction as a genre, a knowledge of the features and techniques of fiction, and a sense of the development of the genre.

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

Shakespeare for non-English majors. Seven to ten major plays, including representative comedies, such as The Taming of the Shrew; histories, such as Richard III; tragedies, such as Hamlet; and romances, such as The Tempest.Does not satisfy requirements for English major.

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

Linguistics theory and method. Topics include the English sound system, morphology, syntactic structure, semantics, and historical and contemporary dialect variation. Language acquisition, language and the brain, and computer processing and human language.
   
 

ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

Basic editorial skills with a wide range of publications. Stylistic editing (conventions of written English, consistency, effectiveness of syntax, appropriateness of diction), substantive editing (accuracy, legal issues, ethics), and production editing (layout, typography, electronic publication processing). Introduction to resources such as standard reference works and professional organizations.

ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literat (3 credits)

Readings, in English translation, or non-Western literary masterpieces from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa to the modern period, including excerpts from texts such as the Upanishads, the Ramayana, the Sundiata, Gilgamesh, A Thousand and One Nights, and the Quran and such authors as Confucius, Oe Kenzaburo, Omar Khayyam, Rumi, and Amos Oz.

ENG 220 - Studies in Great Works of Western Literature (3 credits)

Readings, in English translation, of Western literary masterpieces, from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East and Europe towards the present, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, Danta, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Austen, Flaubert, Dickinson, Tolstoy, Kafka, and Woolf.Credit will not be given for both ENG/FL 220 and either ENG/FL 221 or ENG/FL 222.
   
 

ENG 221 - Literature of the Western World I (3 credits)

Readings from English translations of Biblical, Classical, Medieval, and Early Renaissance literature, including works by such authors as Homer, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, St. Paul, St. Augustine, Marie de France, and Dante.
   
 

ENG 222 - Literature of the Western World II (3 credits)

Readings from English translations of Renaissance, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and Early Modern literature, emphasizing the cultures of continental Europe from the Renaissance to 1900, and including such authors as Petrarch, Erasmus, Rabelais, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Moliere, Voltaire, Rousseau, Goethe, Flaubert, and Tolstoy.
   
 

ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Russian, Eastern European, Western European, Latin American, Canadian, Australian.

ENG 224 - Contemporary World Literature II (3 credits)

Twentieth-century literature of some of the following cultures: Asian, Arabian, African, Caribbean, Native-American.
   
 

ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

Study of literature about illness, epidemics, and the science and practice of medicine. Readings will include works by authors such as Boccaccio, Defoe, George Eliot, Kafka, William Carlos Williams, Susan Sontag, and Tony Kushner.

ENG 246 - Literature of the Holocaust (3 credits)

Fictional and nonfictional versions of the Holocaust, focusing on themes of survival, justice, theology, and the limits of human endurance.
   
 

ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

African-American writing and its relationships to American culture and history. Covers such writers as Wheatley, Douglass, Chesnutt, Dunbar, DuBois, Hughes, Hurston, Wright, and Morrison.

ENG 249 - Native American Literature (3 credits)

A survey of Native American literatures from before contact with Europeans to contemporary culture. Writers may include: Apess (Pequot), Ridge (Cherokee), Silko (Laguna Pueblo), Momaday (Kiowa), Power (Sioux) Gunn Allen (Laguna-Sioux), Harjo (Creek), and Erdrich (Anishinaabe).
   
 

ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

Brian Blackley

Significant British authors chosen from among such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens, Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, and Yeats.Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 andeither ENG 261 or 262.

ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

Significant American authors chosen from among such figures as Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Morrison.Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or 266.

ENG 260 - Introduction to Literary Study (3 credits)

Introduces fundamental questions in literary history and critical theory. Emphasizes critical reading skills and prepares students for the kinds of courses--surveys, genre courses, author courses, problem-based courses--that are part of the Englishmajor. Papers prepared using standard word processing programs.
   
 

ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of English literature to 1660, including Old English, Middle English, and Renaissance writing, focusing on such central authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Credit will not be given for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

ENG 262 - English Literature II (3 credits)

A survey of English literature from 1660 to the present. Poetry, fiction, drama and intellectual prose by such central writers as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Bronte, Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce and Eliot. Credit will not be given for both ENG 262 and ENG 251.
   
 

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War, including such central authors as Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Thoreau, and Whitman. Credit will not be given for both ENG 265 and ENG 252.

ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present, including such central authors as Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Crane, Wharton, Frost, Eliot, Hemingway, Hurston, Faulkner, Wright, O'Connor, and Morrison. Credit will not be given for both ENG 266 and ENG 252.

ENG 267 - LGBTQI Literature in the U.S. (3 credits)

Howard Gene Melton II

Chronological survey of works of literature by and about gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex communities in the U.S. Primary texts will be considered in historical, political, and literary contexts. Brief consideration of early works from colonial period and 19th century with primary focus on 20th and 21st century texts.

ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

Examination of basic film techniques and basic methods of film analysis. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating film as a major art form.

ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

Introduction to the basic elements and principles of three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction and drama. Reading and class discussion of student work. Recommended for students with no prior experience in creative writing.

ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing short prose fiction. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of fiction.
 

ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.
   
 

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

Comprehensive study of various approaches to writing about film. Primary focus is on the critical and evaluative practice involved in writing film criticism for non-academic audiences. Film screenings, discussion of assigned readings, and in-classwriting workshops aid students in preparing a portfolio of film writing that includes film reviews of various lengths.

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

ENG 314 - Technical Document Design and Editing (3 credits)

ENG 316 - Principles of News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Paul Rodman Cockshutt Jr

Prerequisite ENG 214, ENG 101

Techniques of writing news stories and feature articles. Components of newsworthiness, examination of evidence, interview techniques, varied writing styles. Role of newspapers and journalism in America.
   
 

ENG 321 - Survey of Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

Brent Simoneaux

Prerequisite: ENG 101

A writing course based on the study of rhetoric. Readings on the principles of invention, arrangement, and style; analysis of written texts; writing of persuasive texts for a variety of audiences and purposes.

ENG 326 - History of the English Language (3 credits)

Prerequisite: ENG 101

Development of the English language from its Indo-European origins to the present. Emphasis on historical and comparative linguistic methodology and on changes in sound, syntax, and meaning.

ENG 327 - Language and Gender (3 credits)

Caroline Marie Myrick
Introduction to the use of language by men and women. Research in Linguistics and Women's Studies addressing issues such as the acquisition of gender-differentiated language, gender and conversational interaction, sexism in language, gender issues in society, and the relationship between language, gender, and other social constructs (e.g., class, culture, and ethnicity).
 Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 328 - Language and Writing (3 credits)

Jeffrey Leo Reaser

We will investigate the language and writing and the intersection of these from a descriptive point of view. We will examine English phonetics, morphology, and syntax, with an eye toward refining understanding of and approaches to teaching about writing and writing errors. Ultimately, students are asked to consider how meta-linguistic awareness helps teachers lead their students to explore and discover information about language. ENG 328 is designed specifically for students in the LTN and MSL tracks. Non-teacher-education majors are welcome to take the class, but there is some assumed knowledge of educational psychology and pedagogy. Contact the instructor if you want more information about the appropriateness of the class for you. Please note that this is not a class aimed at improving your writing or editing.

 

ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

Prerequisite: two film and/or creative writing courses (6 hours total)

In this writing workshop, students will develop skills in narrative structure, screenplay

format, and story elements (character, dialogue, scene construction). In the first portion of

the course, we focus on structure, character and dialogue. The remainder of the course is

devoted to the writing and critique of full-length original screenplays.

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 350 - Professional Internships (3 credits)

Susan M Katz

Directed work experience for CHASS majors including work-site mentoring and evaluation.  Department supervision includes course work directed toward designing employment application materials, developing a portfolio of professional work or relevant research paper, considering a variety of career options, and reading literature on workplace socialization. Students must provide their own transportation to the internship site. Modest liability insurance fee required.

Contact Professor Katz for more information.

ENG 363 - The British Novel of the 19th Century (3 credits)

Leila S May

In this course we will explore the nineteenth-century British novel from a variety of interrelated vantage points. We will examine the conditions of production--the historical and cultural contexts--which generate these works and which they in turn participate in generating. Of particular concern will be the ways in which representations of gender, sexuality, work, class relations, and the family function in these texts, as well as the effect of narrative form and technique on these representations. The literary genres on which we will most closely focus this semester will include the gothic, sensation, and fin-de-siècle ("end of the century") fiction. Novelists will include Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, M. E. Braddon, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker. Grades will be based on informal writings, two papers (or a paper and a project), weekly contributions to web discussions, a midterm and a final exam.

ENG 364 - History of Film to 1940 (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

This course begins with the international origins of motion pictures and traces the medium's evolution from experimental novelty to economic big business.  We will study the development of form, style, narrative, and industry practices through several national cinemas, including French, German, Italian, British, Soviet, and American. Along with an understanding of major and minor cinematic movements, this course seeks to give students a sense of the cultural and historical context of cinematic production. We will screen narrative and experimental film, as well as nontheatrical film (such as home movies and educational film). The course includes readings and screenings, weekly quizzes, a series of examinations, and several written assignments. 

ENG 377 - Fantasy (3 credits)

John J. Kessel

Fantasy

 

A historical and thematic survey of forms of non-realistic fiction.  The course will consider fantasy as a loosely associated set of fictions that violate the tenets of realism.  We will examine the origins of fantasy in folk and fairy tales, trace its development as a separate genre into the twentieth century in the works of J.R.R. Tolkien, and his followers, and read works in related genres such as supernatural horror fiction, surrealism, magic realism, nonsense, and metafiction.  Readings will typically include such works as The Hobbit, Dracula, Alice in Wonderland, The Book of the New Sun, A Wizard of Earthsea, and works originally published in other languages by Kafka, Borges, Garcia Marquez, and others.

 

ENG 381 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Catherine A Warren

ENG 381 Creative Nonfiction 3 credits

Cat Warren

In this class, students learn to work with a genre that marries storytelling and journalism. One writer described creative nonfiction as “true stories, well told.” It is a broad genre that includes New Journalism, Literary Journalism, and Narrative Nonfiction. It includes personal essays, features, profiles, and memoir. Students will read exemplary works from Joan Didion, David Sedaris, Susan Orleans, John Edgar Wideman, Rebecca Skloot, Annie Dillard, and John McPhee, among many others. Students will also consider some of the ethics of creative nonfiction. The majority of students’ time will be spent learning the tools and techniques of immersion reporting and research and creating their own works of creative nonfiction. The class will run partly as a workshop, partly as a seminar, with outside readings, and at least two student-instructor conferences during the semester.

ENG 385 - Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature (3 credits)

ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

John J. Kessel

 Intermediate Fiction Writing


English 388 is a fiction writing class for students who have taken Eng 287 or 288 or have experience writing stories. Though I believe that no writer is ever beyond issues of craft, I will assume you have some familiarity with the essentials of fiction writing. 


Students will be asked to read a considerable number of published works of fiction, to write exercises early in the semester, and to write two short stories and one revision. You will do written critiques of the manuscripts of your classmates and discuss them in workshop session that will take up our class time after the first month or so. Grades will be based on your critiques of other student stories, your own stories, and your revision.

ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will give special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems. Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision. The course expects students to be familiar with the themes, techniques and elements of poetry writing. We will read single collections of contemporary poems by a number of recommended authors. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and will create a handmade broadside. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works may be reviewed. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet and participate in a class poetry reading. The course stresses reading as a writer and provides a foundation from which students can pursue further studies in poetry writing.

ENG 392 - Major World Author (3 credits)

Nicholas Halpern

In this class we will engage in an in-depth discussion of the novels, plays and short stories of Samuel Beckett, one of the most profound and darkly hilarious writers of the twentieth century. Among the works we will read are Murphy, Watt, Molloy, Krapp's Last Tape, Endgame, Waiting for Godot, First Love, The Expelled, and The End.  There will be three five-to-seven-page papers and a final exam.

ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Larysa Anna Mykyta

Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

Alexander Paul Monea
 "Activism by Design"
 
Course Description: Preparation for work in multimedia-based activist campaigns and civic rhetoric. Develops basic technical skills in text, web, graphic, and audiovisual, petition, and mass email design, and the means to disseminate them. Also develops critical awareness of the media and information students work with and the rhetorical skills to mobilize them in a campaign for issues of their choice.

 

 

 
Helen Burgess ENG/COM 395
Visual Literacy and Multimodal Communication
 
Just as texts can be read if we learn to speak the language, we can also learn to "read” images and objects, which have their own kinds of communicative modes and practices. This class will focus on the reading, interpretation and creation of visual culture in the form of images, type and multimodal compositions. Students will work to produce graphical, typographical, and 3-d physical objects.
Objectives:
·      to analyze some of the ways in which visual communication works.
·      to get a grounding in typographical communication.
·      to gain theoretical lenses through which to analyze 2- and 3-d objects.
·      to think about different ways of communicating quantitative and argumentative ideas.
 

400-level Courses


ENG 400 - Applied Criticism (3 credits)

W J Miller

Types and methods of literary criticism designed specifically for students intending to teach English in high school.

ENG 406 - Modernism (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

The first half of the twentieth century bears the imprints of much change and upheaval:  devastating international wars, interracial conflict, anti-colonial  and anti-imperial movements, the struggle for gender equality and visibility for “non-normative” sexual expression, secularization, industrialization, the migration and movement of people, as well as the speed-up of technology and the increasing interconnectedness of globalization.  Many readers of modernism have seen the era as producing a profound sense of alienation in which formerly stable values and categories have been disrupted, making it difficult to locate oneself securely in the world or feel a sense of home.  For some writers, however, it becomes a liberating atmosphere in which new identities can be formed, different ways of relating to culture and nation can be imagined, and new forms of language and representation can be pioneered.  This course investigates the ways that ideas of being at home, of identifying one’s position (in culture, in language and literature, in the nation-state), are mourned, redefined, and reterritorialized in various kinds of modernisms, plural.  Part of our discussion will explore what happens when the "when" and the "where" of modernism become fixed in certain ways, and how  traditional coordinates of modernism change when we consider literary texts that originate beyond Europe and the U. S. 

 

Possible authors/texts include: Gustave Flaubert, James Joyce, Ezra Pound, H.D., T.S. Eliot, Gertrude Stein, Langston Hughes, Helene Johnson, E.M. Forster, Mulk Raj Anand, Jean Rhys,  Miguel Hernandez, and the 1930 film Borderline (Dir. Kenneth MacPherson and starring Paul and Eslanda Robeson).  Some of our reading will  draw from a range of non-literary materials produced within the period as well: geography, cutlural anthropology, sociology,  turn-of-the-century sexology, and manifesto and essay writing.  Required work will include several papers, a midterm, and a final.

   

ENG 411 - Rhetorical Criticism (3 credits)

ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Robert C. Kochersberger

Robert Kochersberger

Advanced work in writing news stories, profiles, features and investigative stories.  Includes analysis and critical reading of print media.  Assumes thorough knowledge of AP style and rudiments of news and feature writing. The course will be taught in two segments. For the first, students will work in pairs to cover beats on campus and in the community. For the second, students will work together as an investigative team looking into sexual assault on campus, with the goal of a class publication on the topic.

ENG 426 - Analyzing Style (3 credits)

David M Rieder PhD

Introduction to the analysis of style in print-based texts, hypertexts, and visual culture. The semester will be divided among three analytical approaches. First, we begin with Richard Lanham's textbook, Analyzing Prose, which introduces you to the important roles that style plays in prose writing. This first section will offer you a grounding in the rhetorical canon of style. Next, we'll study the changing role of style in the electronic form of hypertext writing. We'll focus our attention on Shelley Jackson's hypertext novel, Patchwork Girl. Finally, we'll look up and off the page/screen to analyze (postmodern) American culture, which is heavily influenced by communicational issues related to style.

In addition to two 6-7 page essays (and other shorter writing assignments), you will learn how to write a hypertextual essay in StorySpace, the same software program that Jackson used to write her hypertext novel.

ENG 430 - Advanced Screenwriting (3 credits)

William Wilton Barnhardt

Prerequisite: an A or B in ENG 330 or permission of the instructor

This is an advanced screenwriting course that aims toward the production of an competent professional full-length movie script (100 pages). It continues where the Introductory Screenwriting left off though the same issues of craft--cinematic thinking, structure, dialogue, plot and character development--are still vital to the project.  As important as one's own script, will be your helpfulness to your colleagues and the discussions in workshop.

ENG 448 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 449 - 16th-Century English Literature (3 credits)

Margaret Fyfe

Forms of Feeling in the English Renaissance

 

From the mix-tape to the mashup, cardboard picket signs to social media revolutions, we are accustomed to expressing our sentiments through a variety of mediated forms. As these forms respond to our needs to communicate, so too do they structure how our feelings can be expressed. This dynamic pervades today’s rapidly changing media climate, but it has deep roots in textual and literary culture. This course investigates the relations between forms and feeling in an earlier historical context, the English Renaissance, during which literary authors and essayists reckoned with the expressive possibilities and limitations of a variety of emerging generic and textual conditions. Attention to these dynamics can offer us a critical platform for thinking about the relations of form and content, whether in historical or contemporary contexts.

The development and adaptation of new literary forms hit a fever pitch in sixteenth-century England. At the same time, the period saw an intensification of theorizing about how and why we feel the ways that we do. Theories of emotion were everywhere and were constantly in flux, particularly with the publication in 1543 of Vasalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica which challenged a purely humoral model for understanding the body. We’ll come to grips with humoral theory, neo-platonic and Aristotelian views on the emotions, the skepticism of a thinker like Montaigne, the public functions of affect through Castiglione’s wildly popular Book of the Courtier, and will use these contexts to inform our reading of the period’s signal works of poetry and prose. Along the way, we will consider the implications of the differing formats and editions in which these texts appeared, from the poetic miscellany, to the coterie manuscript, to the single-authored collection.

ENG 455 - Literacy in the U.S. (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

ENG 455 Literacy in the United States

At this moment, astonishingly complex processes are at work as you read, interpret, and reflect on these words. For most of us, these processes are unconscious: we read because we have been reading for most of our lives. It's something that, from our perspective as educated people, we take mostly for granted, yet almost every aspect of our lives—including our social and familial relationships, our further education, our jobs, our ambitions, even, on some level, our survival—depends on it.

In this course, we'll examine the nature of literacy, including its history, purposes, acquisition, institutionalization, and present status in the United States, with special focus on cultural diversity and social equity. We'll learn about where written literacy came from, what actually happens (moment by moment) when we read, what's required to learn to read, and why some adults in the U.S. are illiterate. We'll explore controversies about the best approaches for reading instruction, the relationship of reading and writing, the relationship of speaking and reading (including the role of spoken dialects), and how new technologies are affecting literacy. We'll also consider some of the social, political, and ethical issues of literacy in the U.S.—for example, how literacy is related to power, or how written texts can exploit, deceive, or exclude. As part of the service-learning requirements for the course, you will tutor a child or young adult for two hours per week in a local school- or community-based literacy program that serves members of disadvantaged communities. Tutoring opportunities will be provided in class. Course requirements include frequent low-stakes writing, papers, and quizzes. The course is participatory: limited lecturing and lots of interaction.

ENG 476 - Southern Literature (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

Literary traditions of the Southeastern United States from colonization through the present, including study of such major writers as Byrd, Jefferson, Simms, Poe, Douglass, Twain, Chesnutt, Glasgow, Hurston, Tate, Wolfe, Faulkner, Warren, Wright, Welty, Williams, O'Conner, Percy, and Smith.

ENG 486 - Shakespeare, The Earlier Plays (3 credits)

Marvin W Hunt

Shakespeare's major works before 1600 with emphasis on his development as a playwright.

ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will give special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems. Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision. The course continues to explore the themes, techniques and elements of poetry writing. We will read single collections of contemporary poems by a number of recommended authors. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and will create a handmade broadside. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works will be reviewed. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet and participate in a class poetry reading. The course stresses reading as a writer and provides a foundation from which students can pursue further studies in poetry writing.

ENG 490 - Studies in Medieval Literature (3 credits)

Matthew Evan Davis

Often, when we think of the earliest English drama Shakespeare is the first name that comes to mind. But this ignores the wealth of dramatic works that were performed in the centuries leading up to Shakespeare's time. Shakespeare did not come from nothing, after all, and this class will explore the drama of the middle ages.

Medieval drama will seem odd even if you have read a lot of plays in the past. However, it is also fascinating, bawdy, often humorous, and shows interesting insights into the issues and culture of the period. This course is an upper-division introduction to the three main types of medieval English drama: the pageant play, the hall play, and the place and scaffold (or locus and platea) play.  In addition to reading about the plays, this course will also consider how these works might be performed, using locations around the NC State campus.  The conversation with these plays both on the page and on the stage will provide you with improved analytical ability, an expanded repertoire of thoughts about literature and the world, and a finer understanding of literary and dramatic history.

More information about the class can be found at http://www.matthewedavis.net/pageandstage/

ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

Anne Baker

Literature and the Environment

 

Course Description:

This course will examine writing about the natural environment from the classical era to the present.  We will consider how changing cultural values have shaped competing definitions of nature and how writers have stretched generic boundaries in order to convey the relationship between human and the natural world in nuanced ways.  Related issues to be addressed include: the pastoral ideal, Romantic and Transcendentalist views of nature, the tension between scientific and religious understandings of the natural world, the rise of the conservation movement, gendered views of nature, and the relationship between nature writing and environmental activism.  We will also look at landscape painting and photography in order to explore the similarities and dissimilarities between visual and verbal representations of nature. 

 

ENG 492 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Devin A. Orgeron PhD

Cinema and the 1990s

One of the most exciting decades in cinematic history, the 1990s saw a monumental rise in independent film production in the U.S.  It was also a decade of highly influential international cinematic production (Hong Kong, Iran, Denmark, Hungary, Belgium, etc.).  And, while it is unlikely that we will view either TITANIC or JURASSIC PARK in this course (stranger things have happened), it is also a decade of MASSIVE (titanic?) technological change as advancements in CGI and digitial technology more broadly changed the movie-making/going experiences in ways we are still trying to comprehend.  

This course will examine major film from the decade and their critical/cultural context.  We will, among other things, begin a conversation about how even recent history affects our production of culture.  To this end, other aspects of 1990s popular culture will be explored as well.  

Students will write a critical paper, complete a research project, and take a cumulative final examination. 


Films explored might include:

pulp fiction – bottle rocket – fargo - dazed and confused - the silence of the lambs – the usual suspects – the matrix – fight club – goodfellas – the big lebowski – boogie nights – trainspotting – chungking express

Major topics include:                                                                                                                     The rise of American independent cinema - Dogme 95 – Hong Kong Second Wave – CGI - The Home Theater Movement

 

 


Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

ENG 492/IDS 496, The Musical [special topics in film]

Dr.  Marsha Gordon

Gotta sing? Gotta dance? This class will explore film musicals in all of their splendor and variety, from gritty, Depression-era black-and-white stories about tough times; to fanciful Technicolor wonders celebrating the romance and joy of life; to post-modern meditations on contemporary life.  Our goal will be to better understand the genre’s history, its international variations, and its current status.  The musical film has experienced a number of distinct cycles and transformations, with which students will become familiar as we look at films from the United States, France, Australia, China, India, and England.  Far from being an exclusively romantic, nostalgic, or uplifting genre (although it can be all of these things), the musical film has also addressed politics (personal, national, and global), tested the boundaries of morality (from its earliest years on), and pushed the limits of film style and form.  Directors will likely include Mervyn LeRoy/Busby Berkeley, Stanley Donen/Gene Kelly, Jean Luc Godard, Jacques Demy, Lars von Trier, Tsai Ming Liang, Bob Fosse, and Baz Luhrmann.  Students will do in-class presentations and research papers, and take a final oral examination.

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (3-6 credits)

Brian Blackley

This special topic class examines Shakespearean literature through comparison of the possibilities of meaning in the source materials, Shakespeare’s adaptations of those texts, and the meanings achieved in various film presentations of the plays.  Play selections represent comedy, tragedy, and romance, ranging from his early years in the theater to his later works. There will be one formal essay, an in-class presentation, and 2 exams. This class is restricted to students with at least six hours of English credit above the 100-level.

Jason Swarts PhD

Help in a Networked Age

 

The nature of computer-supported work has changed substantially over the decades, from a model focused on individuals working alone, at simple tasks, within singular software applications to a networked model in which people work collaboratively, on complex tasks, across sprawling infrastructures of hardware and software. Never before have users needed more support but done less to seek it out, at least in traditional sources. Computer documentation, as we know it, softbound volumes that delineate tasks and steps, has become antiquated. It addresses tasks and problems that are too simple, delivers help in forms that are too limiting, and updates at speeds that are too glacial. Recognizing these shortcomings, users are turning more toward crowd-based solutions like wikis, forums, and video clearinghouses, effectively elevating the importance of emergent, need-driven amateur help documentation. In light of these developments, technical communicators rightly wonder what has happened to their professional roles. They aren't vanishing but they are changing. This course will examine those changes and help students develop skills that are better suited to producing and managing new forms of documentation that include video, wiki knowledge bases, and community forums. Students will learn to produce the kind of living documentation that users are turning to and come to understand the technical communicator's new role as a curator or manager of that information

James Stephen Mulholland

 

Slaves, Pirates, and Revolutionaries: Money, Power, and Politics in the Atlantic World

 

In 1781, the Zong, a British-owned slave ship, encountered a hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean. To prevent it from sinking, the crew tossed overboard its cargo of 142 African slaves. After returning home safely to Britain, the Zong’s owners filed an insurance claim for their lost property of slaves.

The ensuing legal case was nasty and raised notorious questions about the eighteenth-century Atlantic world: were the Africans on the Zong murdered? Were they human beings, or property, or both? What does it mean to collect insurance payments for dead African slaves?

This seminar will use this historical event—and others like it—to capture the tumultuous period between 1600 and 1800 in the Atlantic world. We will examine slavery, the slave trade, and the abolitionist movement, and then “build out” from there to discuss how escaped slaves became an important part of Atlantic piracy, and how that piracy functioned as a centuries-long protest against the subjugation of monarchy, and how the mixed-race crews of pirate ships formed a laboratory for democracy and an inspiration for the American Revolution. Our reading will draw not only from literature—reading authors such as Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, William Cowper, William Blake, and Thomas Jefferson—but also the period’s discussion of history, law, and economics.

I intend this class to function both as a seminar and as a “humanities lab.” In addition to intensive discussion, we will also pursue research projects that seek to turn the humanities classroom into a lab-like experience, allowing students to conduct archival research and to discover new primary sources for our consideration during class time. Although students need not have more than basic computer skills, we will use electronic resources not only to discover new documents, but also to add these documents to the more traditional archive of transatlantic eighteenth-century sources. I want this course to discover new items as much as it discusses what we already know about this period.

Paul CAmm Fyfe

Victorian Media Studies

Courses in “media studies” usually begin with the twentieth century. But the century previous—and the Victorian era in particular—may have seen the emergence of concepts of media, information, and communication which we still use today. This course invites graduate students and advanced undergraduates to consider the emergence of a modern mass media in literature's encounters with changing technologies in the nineteenth century, from the railway and the steam press to the telegraph and telephone. It places Victorian writers (including Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, Twain, and Corelli) in context of their century’s changing “media ecology,” and also explores how, more recently, steampunk and neo-Victorian fiction (including The Difference Engine and The League of Extraordinary Gentleman) refract the Victorian era through more contemporary technological contexts. In a similar way, students will be invited to experiment with contemporary digital tools as they allow us to interrogate the textual past. Thus, “Victorian Media Studies” represents the meeting point of 1) historical studies of Victorian literature and communications technologies, and 2) ways of studying Victorian texts using modern media and computational methods.

500-level Courses


ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

This seminar introduces the discipline of composition: the field of scholarship devoted to the teaching, practice, and study of writing. The course is designed to help new members of this field to (1) familiarize themselves with the range of voices and theoretical assumptions underlying current composition teaching; (2) understand the recent history of composition and its development as a research field; (3) become acquainted with major journals and resources in the field of composition, sufficient for conducting independent explorations of the literature on topics of interest; (4) develop a reading knowledge of research methods in composition, sufficient for interpreting and evaluating the results of published research in the field; and (5) apply their knowledge of the field’s history, theory, and research in analyzing new contexts, developing new pedagogical insights, and raising new questions for research.

ENG 512 - Theory and Research In Professional Writing (3 credits)

Jason Swarts PhD

This course will acquaint you with the theories and methods of research in the fields of professional and technical communication. The course begins with an overview of classic research on the genre of academic research articles and is followed by an overview of qualitative and quantitative research methods, including consideration of study design and data analysis techniques. The course then moves on to a broad consideration of historical, rhetorical, and philosophical issues in the field. We use this background to orient our discussion on a variety of topics, including ethics, multimodal composition, networks, workplace issues, and training. The concepts, theories, and methods discussed in this class will be useful to you throughout the Masters in Technical Communication program.

In addition, you will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of writing projects that will help you become more adept at talking about theory and using data to make scholarly arguments. These activities will include writing a proposal, and a research article.

ENG 513 - Empirical Research In Composition (3 credits)

Susan Miller-Cochran

This course provides students with a foundation for designing research studies in composition that involve the collection of qualitative and quantitative data. The class walks students through the process of designing a research study to include drafting research questions, identifying an appropriate site of study, applying for IRB approval, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions to respond to the research questions. We will look at published research in the field to understand the expectations and trends in empirical research in composition studies, and students will design a research study of their own as a final project in the course. The course can fulfill either the qualitative or quantitative methods requirement for the CRDM doctoral program.

ENG 514 - History Of Rhetoric (3 credits)

Cross-listed with COM 514. Prof. Ken Zagacki

ENG 515 - Rhetoric Of Science and Technology (3 credits)

Carolyn Rae Miller

This course explores science and technology as rhetorical systems (as systems of meaning and belief that require symbolic representation and persuasion), and the theoretical and practical reasons for studying them. Simply put, we will examine why science and technology can be understood both as enterprises that are free of rhetoric and, conversely, as the most successful domains of contemporary rhetoric. In doing so, we will discover assumptions governing scientific and technical communication and introduce several approaches to critical analysis.

The course will cover traditional and contemporary views of science and of rhetoric, the differences between science and technology, internal communication among specialists, and public communication and controversy. The course format is primarily discussion-seminar, with some background lectures. Final grades will be based on informal written responses to the reading, seminar presentations, and two or three formal papers.

 ENG 515 is a required course for the M.S. in Technical Communication and an elective for other students. Doctoral students should enroll in the associated ENG 798 section and will have additional assignments and expectations.

ENG 517 - Advanced Technical Writing, Editing and Docum (3 credits)

Robert S Dicks

ENG 517 Advanced Technical Writing and Editing invites students to explore the writing, editing, and designing skills employed by professional technical writers in their work. The course offers students study in the theory and practice of information design -- that is, in the production of documents that are persuasive, informative, and easy to comprehend. For Fall 2014, we will focus on web design. Assignments include one major website project and shorter assignments in web page design and site navigation (HTML/CSS; Dreamweaver/Fireworks), the use of contentent management systems (Wordpress), and the use of photographs, graphics, audio, and video. Much of the class time will be devoted to computer activities. The course is aimed particularly at those who wish to pursue careers as technical communicators.

ENG 520 - Science Writing for the Media (3 credits)

Catherine A Warren

This three-credit hour course, which is an elective for the master's in technical communication, is also open to students from across campus, including graduate students in the sciences and engineering. It is designed to do three things: teach you how to write a variety of science articles for a variety of mass media and web sites; teach you how to think critically about how the mass media covers science; and teach you how to think critically about science. There are no prerequisites for this course.

The first of the three goals is clearly the raison d'être of the course: that is, a hands-on, pragmatic, "how-to-do-it" approach to science writing. This course is designed to teach you how to communicate through a variety of media, both digital and print: newspapers, magazines, electronic and broadcast outlets. Throughout the term, you will create a science blog and write news articles of varying lengths and complexity.

Good science writing, however, cannot occur without context. The second goal of the course is to learn how to critically analyze science coverage -- by learning the history of science journalism, by studying a variety of approaches to covering science, and by learning how to critically analyze your own work. Part of this means understanding the nature of journalistic constraints.

The final goal of the course is to teach "scientific literacy." Obviously, this means providing you with the tools to understand and translate complex scientific problems and controversies. But this section will also critique science, by providing an introduction to the sociology of science, the politics of science, and the organization of science.

ENG 524 - Introduction to Linguistics (3 credits)

Jeffrey Ingle Mielke

Linguistics is the study of language as a cognitive, biological, and social system. This course is an introduction to the interrelated elements and processes that constitute language, including speech sounds and their mental representations, words, sentence structures, the meanings of words and relationships between words, contextual meanings, and language variation and change. After discussing the fundamental questions that drive inguistic inquiry, we will adopt a "bottom-up" approach, beginning with the smallest units of language -- speech sounds -- and working up to units as large as conversations. We will use naturally occurring language data to analyze linguistic structure. Our central conclusions will include the following:

  • Every aspect of language -- phonetics, phonology, syntax, etc. -- is a system that can be studied from a scientific perspective.
  • Language complexity still far outpaces linguists' understanding of it.
  • All language varieties are equal in structural complexity and communicative potential.
  • Language is unique to humans, and, as such, it a biological phenomenon. But it is also a social phenomenon; therefore, languages change over time.

ENG 525 - Variety In Language (3 credits)

Walter A Wolfram

The course offers an overview of English language variation in the United States from a current sociolinguistic perspective. Social, regional, ethnic, gender, and stylistic variation are examined, along with models for describing, explaining, and applying sociolinguistic knowledge. Students are exposed to a wide range of data on language variation focused on vernacular varieties of American English in general and prominent exemplars from North Carolina in particular. Open to all graduate students and upper-level English majors. 

ENG 527 - Discourse Analysis (3 credits)

Agnes Bolonyai PhD

This course focuses on how language functions in maintaining social actions, relations, and identities and how the way people communicate both shapes and is shaped by social structure, culture, and the choices they make as individuals. You will be acquainted with the major theories, concepts and approaches in the field of discourse analysis: pragmatics, ethnography of speaking, interactional sociolinguistics, conversation analysis, critical discourse analysis, narrative analysis, positioning theory, and politeness theory. For each approach, we will learn its assumptions and distinctive characteristics, methods of analysis, and the important questions for investigation.  In specific, we will examine, in theory and in practice, how the tools of discourse analysis can be put to use to investigate fundamental questions about identity: how we communicate to each other who we are in and through discourse. We will also explore a wide range of issues including how speakers use language to create meaning and negotiate interpersonal relations in everyday talk; what are the linguistic structures and strategies social agents deploy in discourse to achieve their communicative and social goals; how speakers draw inferences about one another’s intended meanings; what is the relationship between the ‘orderliness’ of interactions and ‘naturalized’ social beliefs; how relations of power and conflict are enacted in face-to-face interactions, cross-cultural conversations, and public discourses; how ideologies are acquired, expressed, and reproduced through talk and text; what role language use plays in struggles to impose or resist the new world order of globalization. 

 

ENG 528 - Sociophonetics (3 credits)

Erik R Thomas

The course is designed to introduce students to sociophonetics.  Sociophonetics involves application of modern phonetic techniques to the investigation of language variation and change, including acoustic analysis, perception experiments, and phonetic theories.  Study of English development and English dialects; processes of language change; historical linguistic methodology; field research; language variation and change.  The course structure consists of lectures and discussion, with some laboratory activities.

ENG 529 - 16th-Century Non-Dramatic English Literature (3 credits)

Margaret Fyfe

Forms of Feeling in the English Renaissance

 

From the mix-tape to the mashup, cardboard picket signs to social media revolutions, we are accustomed to expressing our sentiments through a variety of mediated forms. As these forms respond to our needs to communicate, so too do they structure how our feelings can be expressed. This dynamic pervades today’s rapidly changing media climate, but it has deep roots in textual and literary culture. This course investigates the relations between forms and feeling in an earlier historical context, the English Renaissance, during which literary authors and essayists reckoned with the expressive possibilities and limitations of a variety of emerging generic and textual conditions. Attention to these dynamics can offer us a critical platform for thinking about the relations of form and content, whether in historical or contemporary contexts.

The development and adaptation of new literary forms hit a fever pitch in sixteenth-century England. At the same time, the period saw an intensification of theorizing about how and why we feel the ways that we do. Theories of emotion were everywhere and were constantly in flux, particularly with the publication in 1543 of Vasalius’s De Humani Corporis Fabrica which challenged a purely humoral model for understanding the body. We’ll come to grips with humoral theory, neo-platonic and Aristotelian views on the emotions, the skepticism of a thinker like Montaigne, the public functions of affect through Castiglione’s wildly popular Book of the Courtier, and will use these contexts to inform our reading of the period’s signal works of poetry and prose. Along the way, we will consider the implications of the differing formats and editions in which these texts appeared, from the poetic miscellany, to the coterie manuscript, to the single-authored collection.

ENG 539 - Seminar In World Literature (3 credits)

Cross-listed with FL 539. Prof. Nathaniel Isaacson. 

ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

ENG 549 - Modern African Literature (3 credits)

Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi PhD

Mondays—3-5:45pm

This course will focus on twentieth and twenty first century African narratives by male and female authors such as Chinua Achebe, Ama Ata Aidoo, Assia Djebar, Buchi Emecheta, Phaswane Mpe, Flora Mwapa, Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani, Ferdinand Oyono, Tayeb Salih, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, et cetera. We will examine the concept, “the empire writes back,” paying close attention to discourses of empire (colonialism, nationalism, and postcolonialism); to issues of language, subjectivity, hybridity; to questions of gender and sexual politics. We will further examine how (Third World) feminisms, postcolonial theory, transnationalism and globalization are imbricated in critical readings of modern African literature and contemporary postcolonial cultural studies. 

This course fulfils the needs of students in American/British Lit and in World Lit. It also fulfils the need in any concentration as an elective.

Required fiction texts: Assia Djebar, Children of the New World, Buchi Emecheta, The Joys of Motherhood, Phaswane Mpe, Welcome to Our HillbrowAdaobi Tricia Nwaubani, I Do Not Come to You by Chance, Ferdinand Oyono, Houseboy,  Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North,  

ENG 550 - English Romantic Period (3 credits)

Sharon M. Setzer

The course will focus on various ways in which the imaginative literature of the Romantic period responds to the realities of industrialization, war, political turmoil, the exploration of far-away places, the exploitation of other cultures, and competition in the literary marketplace.  While considering historical contexts for literary works, we also will examine how literary works of the Romantic period advocated change, how they were received by the reading public, and how they have provoked spirited interpretative debates in recent years.  Authors studied include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, as well as some of their influential contemporaries. 

ENG 551 - Chaucer (3 credits)

James Robert Knowles

This course is an introduction to one of the great literary works of the English Middle Ages, Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. We will read a broad selection of the tales in their original language. We now call this language “Middle English,” but to Chaucer and his contemporaries it was just plain English, the language of everyday speech -- as opposed to the official French and Latin used by the government and the church. As such, our first task (an ongoing one) will be to learn to read and pronounce and understand Chaucer’s English. We will do this slowly, as a group, pausing as often as necessary to learn unfamiliar words and the historical and cultural contexts from which they derive their meanings. If you have never read Middle English before, do not fear. After a few weeks of practice you will be very comfortable with Chaucer’s language. We can then get on with the fun stuff: to read the poetry with a critical eye and ear; to be amazed at the sheer scope and audacity of Chaucer’s poetic project; to be awestruck by his mastery of multiple forms and genres; to get his dirty jokes (there are lots of these); and finally to try to grasp what made Chaucer an important writer in his own time and why he remains a crucial figure for the study of English literature in the twenty-first century. The graduate version of the course will also spend significant time exploring Chaucer’s many contexts (historical, social, political, literary, linguistic, codicological, etc.) and will introduce students to the long and diverse tradition of scholarship on the Tales

ENG 558 - Studies In Shakespeare (3 credits)

Christopher James Crosbie

Shakespeare Among the Philosophers

The most renowned philosophers – classical, medieval, and early modern alike – emerge in multiple guises throughout Shakespeare’s works.  This course will investigate how Shakespearean drama engages with philosophical traditions of various stripes even as the dramatist presents his works as popular entertainment in the commercial theater.  What strands of intellectual history appear in his plays and to what purpose?  How does the theater translate abstract philosophy into material performance?  This seminar will examine the relation of Shakespearean drama to key philosophical categories (such as ethics, metaphysics, and aesthetics) as well as to particular traditions (such as Aristotelianism, Platonism, Lucretian atomism, and Epicureanism).  Our intent always will be to illuminate the plays themselves.  What, after all, did it meant to perform them for a popular audience in the commercial theaters of early modern London?  For this seminar, we'll read six plays by Shakespeare, each paired with readings from some of philosophy's greatest luminaries; in order to provide greater context, we'll also frequently examine the source materials Shakespeare used for his plots.  Course grades will be determined by a mix of a brief midsemester writing assignment, a final seminar paper, and class participation.

ENG 565 - American Realism and Naturalism (3 credits)

Allen Frederick Stein

We will explore fiction by Mark Twain, Henry James, William Dean Howells, Kate Chopin, Harold Frederic, Frank Norris, Stephen Crane, Edith Wharton, and Theodore Dreiser. In doing this, we’ll also explore the relationship of this fiction to the late-nineteenth-century and early-twentieth-century movements known as Literary Realism and Literary Naturalism. There will be a paper of seven to nine pages and one of twelve to fifteen. There will also be a midterm exam and a final exam.

ENG 575 - Southern Writers (3 credits)

James M. Grimwood

The origins, boundaries, achievements, and failings of the literary culture of the Southeastern United States.  Emphasis on connections between literary expression and other manifestations of Southern culture, with particular attention to attitudes towards language, literacy, eloquence, and authority.  Race, class, gender.  The plantation, slavery, secession, the Old South, various New Souths, the Civil Rights Movement, the Sun Belt.  Relationships between regional identity and local, national,and global markets of meaning.  Mosaic of mostly short readings from many authors, including “major” figures (Jefferson, Poe, Douglass, Twain, Faulkner, Wright, Welty, Warren, O’Connor) and “minor” figures (Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Irwin Russell, Thomas Dixon).  A short paper, a long paper, a midterm exam, and a final exam.

ENG 582 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

Paul CAmm Fyfe

Victorian Media Studies

Courses in “media studies” usually begin with the twentieth century. But the century previous—and the Victorian era in particular—may have seen the emergence of concepts of media, information, and communication which we still use today. This course invites graduate students and advanced undergraduates to consider the emergence of a modern mass media in literature's encounters with changing technologies in the nineteenth century, from the railway and the steam press to the telegraph and telephone. It places Victorian writers (including Dickens, Gaskell, Eliot, Twain, and Corelli) in context of their century’s changing “media ecology,” and also explores how, more recently, steampunk and neo-Victorian fiction (including The Difference Engine and The League of Extraordinary Gentleman) refract the Victorian era through more contemporary technological contexts. In a similar way, students will be invited to experiment with contemporary digital tools as they allow us to interrogate the textual past. Thus, “Victorian Media Studies” represents the meeting point of 1) historical studies of Victorian literature and communications technologies, and 2) ways of studying Victorian texts using modern media and computational methods.

ENG 584 - Studies In Linguistics (3 credits)

ENG 585 - Studies In Film (3 credits)

Course: Moving Image and Media Archaeology
Instructor: Dr. Andrew Johnston
Meets Wednesdays from 6-10 pm
 
How can we write histories of media? How do media emerge out of social and cultural fabrics and then circulate through them before being preserved or discarded? Where are the relics of past media stored and what do the alternative paths not taken and the now forgotten futures of media say about historic moments and the present? Furthermore, what effect do these technologies having on moving image cultures and aesthetic practices? 
 
This seminar will explore media archaeology in the context of film and media studies as well as the digital humanities by examining different scholarly responses to the above questions. We will move through different historical periods, from magic lantern performances and phantasmagoria of the 18th century through film and the phonograph, and then on to recent digital media and magnetic storage technologies like the floppy disk, hard drive, and IP network. Throughout the seminar we will explore these heterogeneous media landscapes of the past in order to better understand contemporary engagements with technologies as well as the aesthetic and cultural practices tied to them. We will read theories of history and other scholarship by Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Jonathan Crary, Michel Foucault, Lisa Gitelman, Alison Griffiths, Katherine Hayles, Erkki Huhtamo, Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Friedrich Kittler, and Siegfried Zielinski.

ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

William Wilton Barnhardt

Enrollment is for MFA Fiction students only.

A writing workshop, exclusively, for the graduate students in the Master of Fine Arts program. Expect to produce (at least) three fiction submissions over the course of term.

ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will focus on works in progress, giving special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems.  Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision.  We will read single collections of contemporary poems, mostly early books or books that established the poet, as a way to begin thinking about the compilation of a manuscript. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and write at least one imitation. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works may be reviewed as well. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet. The course stresses reading as a writer.  For graduate students or advanced students with instructor’s permission. 

ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

Belle McQuaide Boggs

This graduate-level class will read and discuss work by a wide variety of essayists, from originators of the form to innovative contemporary writers. We'll consider craft issues the personal essay shares with fiction and poetry, as well as the way the practice of writing essays can uncover, clarify, and enhance issues and emotions in our other genres. In addition to writerly discussion of form and technique, in-class work will include generative exercises inspired by our readings. For a final project, students will have several choices, including the possibility of creative work.

ENG 592 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

See Eng 592, The Musical, for description. Eng 592 is only open to MA English students enrolled in the film concentraiton. Email marsha_gordon@ncsu.edu for permission to add only if you are an MA film concentration student.

600-level Courses


ENG 624 - Teaching College Composition (3 credits)

Casie J Fedukovich

Preparation for Graduate Teaching Assistants teaching college composition. Introduction to pedagogical principles and practices. Practice in setting course goals, designing writing assignments to meet those goals, developing instructional activities to support assignments, and evaluating student writing. The course is scheduled as a 5-day workshop before classes begin, followed by weekly meetings and mentoring during the fall semester.

ENG 626 - Advanced Writing for Empirical Research (3 credits)

ENG 636 - Directed Readings (1-6 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

ENG 636 provides directed study in areas of special interest that are not addressed in the department's regular course offerings.  See the grad programs website for information about proposing an independent study: http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/graduate/current_students/directed_readings.php.

ENG 669 - Bibliography and Methodology (2 credits)

John D Morillo

ENG 669 Bibliography and Methods of Research

This course introduces you to the world of research; the current profession; your department and our research and writing expectations for you. Class lectures and discussions will include expanding domains of current research materials available in both print and electronic media; the variety of methods in current English studies. You will become familiar with some of the intellectual endeavors that make up modern research in the humanities, begin your own research, and refine the formal, professional oral and written presentation of your information.

ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

ENG 695 - Master's Thesis Research (1-9 credits)

700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3 credits)

Carolyn Rae Miller

See description for ENG 515.

Susan Miller-Cochran

Empirical Methods in Composition

This course provides students with a foundation for designing research studies in composition that involve the collection of qualitative and quantitative data. The class walks students through the process of designing a research study to include drafting research questions, identifying an appropriate site of study, applying for IRB approval, collecting and analyzing data, and drawing conclusions to respond to the research questions. We will look at published research in the field to understand the expectations and trends in empirical research in composition studies, and students will design a research study of their own as a final project in the course. The course can fulfill either the qualitative or quantitative methods requirement for the CRDM doctoral program.

CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 702 - Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

800-level Courses


CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

CRD 895 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9 credits)

HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

James M. Grimwood

Metamorphosis and Metaphor     

          As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.

          Traditions of metamorphosis from Homer and Ovid to the Incredible Hulk and Spider Man, with examples from non-Western as well as—primarily—Western cultures.  Treatment of the history of literary representations of change.  Attention to metamorphic operations generally, including especially metaphor and other figures, translation, and cross-media adaptation.  Readings in Homer's Odyssey, Ovid’s Metamorphoses , Dante’s The Divine Comedy, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chesnutt’s The Conjure Woman, Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis,” etc.  Three papers; a midterm exam and a final exam.

Leila S May

What does it mean to label someone monstrous or mad? All cultures have some means of identifying those who transgress accepted boundaries and standards of established behavior.  Looking at the ways in which these loosely related concepts are rendered in a given historical moment is a useful way of assessing the most strongly defended values of a particular culture and era.  This course will examine how these categories of exclusion have been represented across a broad spectrum of British and American literary, anthropological, medical, sociological, and cinematic works of the last two centuries. In the process, students will develop their critical and interpretive skills as readers, and their analytical and rhetorical strategies as writers.

Catherine Mary Mainland

HON 202: The Art of War

Whether nations win or lose, war has always left its mark on the arts. This course will take a comparative look at artistic responses to the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and modern military campaigns. Through our examination of the history and social psychology of war, we will pay constant attention to the infinitely human urge to use art to deal with the inhumane, comedy to combat tragedy, and story-telling to work through feelings of guilt, loss, inadequacy, or doubt. With readings of poetry, drama, and prose from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and works ranging from cinema and television to video games, we will explore the ways in which humans deal with wars and their aftermath by placing them (safely?) in the artistic realm.

We will study works such as: Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Bierce, “Chickamauga”; Howells, “Editha”; British poetry of WWI; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Camus, The Plague; M*A*S*H* selected episodes; The Producers (1968); O'Brien, The Things They Carried; and paintings and posters related to the wars we will discuss.

Paul CAmm Fyfe

Reading Literature in the Digital Age

What happens when books become screens? When narrative turns into an interactive multimedia experience on a tablet? When reading becomes augmented by statistical analysis and data visualization? This class invites students to ask these and more questions about how our texts, reading, and interpretive practices are changing in a digital age. We will examine electronic texts as well as experimental books and apps; read literature while exploring how computers can analyze and visualize language; and collaboratively document ou­r experiences across a variety of social media platforms. Our works include classic as well as more contemporary texts (from Frankenstein, David Copperfield, and Alice in Wonderland to electronic literature and post-print poetry). This course requires no special technological skills beyond a basic familiarity with file management and the web. It welcomes students of any disciplinary persuasion, especially those curious to experiment in the classroom.