Skip To Main Content
Content

Summer 2015 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 100 - Introduction to Academic Writing (4 credits)

Intensive introduction to critical writing and reading in academic contexts. Exploration of writing processes and academic literacy skills: interpreting assignments; comprehending, analyzing, and evaluating college-level texts;  inventing, drafting, and revising; seeking, providing, and responding to constructive feedback; collaborating effectively under varied learning models. Extensive writing practice and individualized coaching. Attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Intended as preparation for ENG 101. All sections meet in computer classrooms.

ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms.

For further information about the First-Year Writing Requirement, see http://social.chass.ncsu.edu/fwp/NewFrWrReq.htm.

200-level Courses


ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

Representative examples of novels and short stories from different periods, emphasizing understanding and appreciation of fiction as a genre, a knowledge of the features and techniques of fiction, and a sense of the development of the genre.

ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

Basic editorial skills with a wide range of publications. Stylistic editing (conventions of written English, consistency, effectiveness of syntax, appropriateness of diction), substantive editing (accuracy, legal issues, ethics), and production editing (layout, typography, electronic publication processing). Introduction to resources such as standard reference works and professional organizations.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War, including such central authors as Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Thoreau, and Whitman. Credit will not be given for both ENG 265 and ENG 252.

ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

Introduction to the basic elements and principles of three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction and drama. Reading and class discussion of student work. Recommended for students with no prior experience in creative writing.

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

300-level Courses


ENG 321 - Survey of Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Staff

Preq: Junior standing

This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

400-level Courses


ENG 411 - Rhetorical Criticism (3 credits)

ENG 448 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (1-6 credits)

500-level Courses


ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study the African American literary tradition and experience from the perspective of African American writers. Designed to familiarize students with the study of literature at a progressive level, this course is a reading intense exercise in “close,” critical reading. During the course of the semester, we will explore the development of our country’s literature over the last half century, from the black perspective.  

With the help of several seminal texts, including short stories and novels, we will conduct a survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture as we understand it, with an emphasis on fiction (drama and poetry) from, roughly, World War II to the present. As literary critics and social historians, we will attempt to show how these texts in turn define America as we see it, think it, and/or hope it to be. Sometimes this conception is in correlation with that of the dominant culture; often, however, we will see, it is at odds with it.  This duality becomes, very much, the basis for African American consciousness in the twentieth century, something Du Bois labels a pervasive sense of “two-ness.” In addition, we will see how our chosen artists negotiate history, and how the past is ever-present in the African American text. 

600-level Courses


ENG 636 - Directed Readings (1-6 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

ENG 636 provides directed study in areas of special interest that are not addressed in the department's regular course offerings.  See the grad programs website for information about proposing an independent study: http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/graduate/current_students/directed_readings.php.

ENG 695 - Master's Thesis Research (1-9 credits)

ENG 699 - Master's Thesis Preparation (1-3 credits)

CRD

800-level Courses


CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

CRD 895 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9 credits)

CRD 899 - Doctoral Dissertation Preparation (1-3 credits)