Dr Antony H Harrison

Picture of Dr Antony H Harrison

Distinguished Professor

Biography

Antony Harrison's interests include British 19th century studies, women's studies, literary theory, art theory, and digital humanities. Since receiving his Ph. D. from the University of Chicago in 1974, he has taught at North Carolina State, where he currently is Distinguished Professor of English and serves as Head of his department. In 1992 he received the NCSU Alumni Distinguished Research Professor award, one of only three annual awardees in a large, diverse research institution. He has held fellowships from the National Humanities Center, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and the American Council of Learned Societies. He graduated with a bachelor of arts degree from Stanford University in 1970.

Harrison is perhaps best known for his five authored books on Victorian and Romantic poetry and his four-volume edition of the letters of Christina Rossetti.  

He enjoys working with students toward publication of their work. When not managing the complex and diverse activities of the NCSU English Department or choking on the dust of nineteenth-century archives.  

 

Teaching and Research Interests

Harrison´s research interests include textual editing, gender studies, critical theory (especially historicist), nineteenth-century English poetry, the digital humanities, and the history of the book. His most recent singly authored book is The Cultural Production of Matthew Arnold (2009). More recently, he has co-authored Victoria's Lost Pavilion: From Nineteenth-Century Aesthetics to Digital Humanities (2017, with Paul Fyfe, David Hill, Sharon Joffe, and Sharon Setzer). He has also edited The Letters of Christina Rossetti (4 volumes) and served as a Completing Editor for The Correspondence of Dante Gabriel Rossetti. His earlier publications include two theorized studies of Victorian poetry: Victorian Poets and the Politics of Culture: Discourse and Ideology, and Victorian Poets and Romantic Poems: Intertextuality and Ideology; books on Christina Rossetti and A.C. Swinburne; and edited collections of essays on Christina Rossetti and on gender issues in Victorian poetry. He has also co-edited the Blackwell Companion to Victorian Poetry and serves on the editorial boards of Victorian Poetry, Victorian Institute Journal,The Journal of Pre-Raphaelite Studies, the Dante Rossetti Archive, Nineteenth-Century Studies, RaVoN, Review 19, and NINES. He has held grants from the National Endowment for the humanities (three times) as well as the ACLS, and he has been a fellow at the National Humanities Center and the Folger Shakespeare Library.