Fall 2021 Courses

Explore our course offerings for the Fall 2021 semester. 

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH (4 CREDITS)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

200-level Courses


ENG 202 - DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES IN WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 207 - STUDIES IN POETRY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 208 - STUDIES IN FICTION (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 209 - INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE (3 CREDITS)

William P Shaw PhD
Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS (3 CREDITS)

Erik Thomas
ENG 210 provides an overview of how language works and how it is studied.  The course begins with a review of the history of linguistics.  Then it moves into structural properties of language, including morphology, phonetics, phonology, syntax, and semantics.  In each area, students will see the basics of how the topic is analyzed.  After that, the class delves into communication issues, with illustrations of pragmatic concepts relating to conversation and discussion of dialects and language variation.

ENG 214 - INTRODUCTION TO EDITING (3 CREDITS)

Paul Isom
The purpose of the course is to teach editing skills that will help the student understand the concepts and the culture of editing for print and digital publications. The course will also help the student be a more effective editor in a number of contexts, including editing his or her own work, the work of others, professionally and non-professionally.

Christa Williams Gala
A nuts-and-bolts class for editing different kinds of writing in the workplace--and your own. Master the mechanics of grammar, punctuation and AP Style and implement those skills to make copy more concise and interesting. We'll also cover headline writing and the telltale signs of biased writing, libel and fake news. Learn how to fact-check, edit and rework copy with a discerning eye.

ENG 219 - STUDIES IN GREAT WORKS OF NON-WESTERN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Meredith G. Fosque
Traditional Non-Western Literature
Readings in traditional literature, in translation, from Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas.  Students will be introduced to the origins and flourishing of these oldest cultures through the oral and written stories, poems, essays and plays that have become the defining works of these societies.  At the same time we will look at the geographical, historical, and philosophical contexts from which these texts arise. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 223 - CONTEMPORARY WORLD LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 224 - CONTEMPORARY WORLD LITERATURE II (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 232 - LITERATURE AND MEDICINE (3 CREDITS)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD
This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 246 - LITERATURE OF THE HOLOCAUST (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 248 - SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 251 - MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 252 - MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 260 - READING LITERATURE AND EXPLORING TEXTUALITY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 261 - ENGLISH LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

Paul Broyles
This course traverses the first thousand years of English literature (from the mid-7th century to 1667), taking in a wide variety of genres and charting major authors and key literary developments. From Beowulf’s reanimation of a fading heroic past to Margaret Cavendish’s dazzling sci-fi vision of another world, we will see how literature makes and remakes the world with its changing needs and dreams as it responds to upheavals like invasion, pandemic, and social transformation. We will examine the formal, aesthetic aspects that allow literary texts to resonate across time and move us even today; we will also place the works in their historical contexts, exploring how literary texts respond to their environments, and how they might help reshape society. As the semester progresses, we will develop vocabulary and technical skills that allow us to describe very precisely how literature does the things it does.

William P Shaw PhD
A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

James Robert Knowles
This course is an introduction to English literature of the medieval and early modern periods, covering a 500-year period from the late twelfth century to the late seventeenth century. We will read a selection of major writers and texts from the Anglo-Norman period (Marie de France), the Middle English period (the Gawain poet, Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe), the English Renaissance (Shakespeare), and the seventeenth century (Donne, Herbert, Milton). Our approach to reading and discussing these texts will be twofold. First, the aesthetic approach to reading asks us to recognize these poems and plays as works of art with transhistorical value and enduring appeal. Secondly, the historical approach to reading literature asks us to understand the same texts as cultural objects which are deeply embedded in the times, places, and circumstances of their creation. Part of our task will be to recognize how and when our own twenty-first-century moral and aesthetic impulses (what we find beautiful or moving or offensive) diverge from (or converge with) those of the writers we are studying. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts on their own terms and to situate texts within their original cultural contexts. For CHASS majors, fulfills Literature I requirement. Fulfills GEP Humanities credit (3 hours).

ENG 265 - AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 266 - AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3 CREDITS)

Rebecca Ann Walsh
This course focuses on American literature from the Civil War to the present, with particular attention to the construction of, and contests around, race, class, gender, sexuality, and aspects of national identity. Surveying this field in a comprehensive way in one semester is an impossible task, of course, given the rich range of literatures written in the United States in the last century and a half. So this course makes this difficulty its subject matter by interrogating the contested ways that ideas of “American-ness” or categories of “American” have been constructed by various writers working and living in the United States. In particular, we will focus on several dominant, and sometimes paradoxical, ways of understanding what makes American literature distinctly “American.” American literature seems to reproduce an American culture that has a particular identity distinct from other global cultures. But, at the same time, the purportedly democratic nature of our culture means that American literature produces multiple, heterogeneous cultures that tug at the notion of an identifiable shared, singular “Americanness.” Our time during the semester will focus on the literary movements of late Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism with these challenges in mind, with attention to the role that race, class, gender, and national identity play.

ENG 281 - INTRO TO CREATIVE NONFICTION (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 282 - INTRODUCTION TO FILM (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 287 - EXPLORATIONS IN CREATIVE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 288 - FICTION WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 289 - POETRY WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - WRITING ABOUT FILM (3 CREDITS)

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300-level Courses


ENG 305 - WOMEN AND LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 314 - TECHNICAL DOCUMENT DESIGN AND EDITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 315 - PHONETICS (3 CREDITS)

Jeffrey Ingle Mielke
This course is an introduction to phonetics: how spoken language is produced and perceived, and the physical properties of speech. An understanding of phonetics is fundamental to scientific and clinical approaches to speech and language.

ENG 316 - INTRODUCTION TO NEWS AND ARTICLE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Christa Williams Gala
Learn how to write concise stories about events and people with a special focus on the tenets of media writing, including writing leads, establishing story angles, interviewing and research, quote gathering, editing and fact-checking. Students will learn the difference between writing for print and digital platforms and practice through writing their own stories, including articles and profiles. Regular quizzes on AP Style and current events will be given.

Paul Isom
This course is designed to develop and hone skills in fact gathering and writing. The student must demonstrate competence in collecting information and interpreting and communicating that information in news style. Special emphasis is given to news judgment and collecting information from primary and secondary sources; story structure, writing quality, proper grammar and spelling, editing and revising, speed with accuracy and clarity; and responsibility in reporting.

ENG 320 - ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF SPEECH (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 321 - SURVEY OF RHETORICAL THEORY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 323 - WRITING IN THE RHETORICAL TRADITIONS

Ronisha Browdy
This course uses ancient African and Greco-Roman rhetorical concepts, theories, principles and practices to offer students opportunities to analyze and compose rhetorical texts. It provides an overview of western cultural rhetorical concepts like rhetorical situation, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical devices, and rhetorical canons. It also provides an introduction to rhetorical traditions from African cultural traditions, like the canons of ancient Egyptian rhetoric and African philosophies, principles, and practices (e.g., nommo and Maat). Through this multi-cultural rhetorical lens, students are tasked to: 1) conduct analyses of written, oral, and visual texts from a variety of contexts, genres, and mediums, 2) compose their own persuasive texts for a variety of audiences and purposes, and 3) interrogate culture and identity as significant parts of rhetoric and communication.

ENG 324 - MODERN ENGLISH SYNTAX (3 CREDITS)

Erik Thomas
ENG 324 covers the general features of sentence structures in English.  The semester begins with what the term grammar means, including prescriptive vs. descriptive notions and what sorts of structural features it covers.  It then goes into the notion of “parts of speech,” showing how the ways they are taught in secondary education are inadequate for linguistic description of language.  Much of the semester involves learning how to diagram sentences in the method used in linguistics, but each grammatical construction is presented individually so that the topic is readily digestible to students.  Near the end of the semester, the course covers how syntax interacts with semantics and what, precisely, terms such as subject and direct object mean.

ENG 325 - SPOKEN AND WRITTEN TRADITIONS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH DIALECTS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 327 - LANGUAGE AND GENDER (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 328 - LANGUAGE AND WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 330 - SCREENWRITING (3 CREDITS)

Susan Jenny Emshwiller
Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, in-class written explorations of specific concepts, and sharing of students’ work we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. Students will learn about structure, characterization, creating dynamic dialogue, subtext, subplots, theme, exposition, etc. utilizing established screenplay formats. The course will involve studying great films and scripts, participating in critiques, and the writing and revising of original material. Over the course, students will write scenes focusing on specific screenwriting elements, and share and critique these pieces. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and will have a work-in-progress screenplay.

ENG 331 - COMMUNICATION FOR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - COMMUNICATION FOR SCIENCE AND RESEARCH (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 339 - LITERATURE AND TECHNOLOGY  (3 CREDITS)

Paul Fyfe
How does literature represent emerging technologies? What does literature reveal about the "socio-technical imaginary" of different moments in history? And how might literature itself change with the very technologies used to write, publish, and read it? In this course, we dive into the relationships between literature and technology from the nineteenth-century telegraph to the Internet. Using a variety of novels, short stories, poetry, and criticism, we will identify how literary representations of technology change over time, then analyze the social and cultural commentary these representations make possible. Authors may include Mark Twain, E.M. Forster, Emily St John Mandel, Colson Whitehead, China Mieville, Patricia Lockwood.

ENG 364 - HISTORY OF FILM TO 1940 (3 CREDITS)

Josie Barth
How did film evolve from an experimental technology—30-second-long flickering pictures—to a major industry and the most influential cultural form in the world? This course will trace the early history of global film, including developments in production and exhibition technology, film form, and how audiences made meaning of this new medium. Our discussion will be animated by questions like the following: How did new forms of perception change viewers’ experience of the world and their relationship to others? How did early filmmakers and viewers establish a shared visual and narrative language? What technical, industrial, and cultural factors encouraged films to start telling stories? Who participated in this new public sphere, and who was excluded from it? Where did the concept of the “movie star” come from? How did these developments intersect with major world-historical events, such as war, revolution, decolonization, and the Great Depression? Through lectures, screenings, discussion, and a hands-on creative project, we will see how early film history sheds light on our own moment of industrial, technological, and social change.   

ENG 370 - AMERICAN FICTION, TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 375 - AFRICAN AMERICAN CINEMA (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 376 - SCIENCE FICTION (3 CREDITS)

Thomas P. Phillips
This section of Eng 376 examines the science fiction genre from the general standpoint of its aesthetic and thematic development as aligned with historical contexts, the latter being invariably connected to technological advances. Specifically, it will follow the genre’s ongoing fascination for and insights into the category of the human.

Assessment: class participation, two formal essays, and two exams.

ENG 382 - FILM AND LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 388 - INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 389 - INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 392 - MAJOR WORLD AUTHOR (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 393 - STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE (3 CREDITS)

Sujata S. Mody
Modern Hindi-Urdu Short Story
This course provides a focused treatment of the modern short story in Hindi/Urdu. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre from the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern genre in the colonial and nationalist periods in South Asian literary history; students will also be introduced to some writing from India and Pakistan in the post-Independence era. All readings are available in English translation.

ENG 394 - STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 395 - STUDIES IN RHETORIC AND DIGITAL MEDIA (3 CREDITS)

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400-level Courses


ENG 400 - APPLIED CRITICISM (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 406 - MODERNISM (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 416 - ADVANCED NEWS AND ARTICLE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 422 - WRITING THEORY AND THE WRITING PROCESS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 426 - ANALYZING STYLE (3 CREDITS)

David M Rieder
Introduction to the analysis of style in print-based texts, hypertexts, and visual culture. The semester will be divided among three analytical approaches. First, we begin with Richard Lanham's textbook, Analyzing Prose, which introduces you to the important roles that style plays in prose writing. This first section will offer you a grounding in the rhetorical canon of style. Next, we'll study the changing role of style in the electronic form of hypertext writing. We'll focus our attention on Shelley Jackson's hypertext novel, Patchwork Girl. Finally, we'll look up and off the page/screen to analyze (postmodern) American culture, which is heavily influenced by communicational issues related to style.

In addition to two 6-7 page essays (and other shorter writing assignments), you will learn how to write a hypertextual essay in StorySpace, the same software program that Jackson used to write her hypertext novel.

ENG 439 - STUDIES IN ENGLISH RENAISSANCE LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Margaret Simon
The English Renaissance Remixed
You've probably read some Shakespeare, and might have learned about the European Renaissance in history class. But what do the term and period really signify, especially for literature written in English? This course introduces you to the poets, politicians, historians, and cultural figures of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. We'll read the work of well-known writers like William Shakespeare and John Donne, but we'll also spend a lot of time encountering authors you've likely never heard of, particularly women writers and non-elite individuals writing for a growing print market. We'll consider the production of English literature within a global context. How, for example, can we speak of an English cultural Renaissance ("rebirth"), with all of its positive connotations, during a period that saw the brutal establishment of England's settler plantations and the slave trade? We'll consider how we can best interpret the signal works of an era and culture that often suppressed the voices of anyone outside of a male English elite. With trips to the library's Special Collections and work with texts in their original print and manuscript forms, we will consider what we can learn about both well-known and marginalized voices through archival research and non-canonical literature.

ENG 448 - AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 451 - CHAUCER (3 CREDITS)

Paul Broyles

Introduction to the study of Chaucer through an intensive reading of his most famous work, The Canterbury Tales. We’ll explore medieval literature and society as we work our way through Chaucer’s great fourteenth-century literary collection, encountering dirty jokes, shocking violence, and fierce social debates along the way. At the same time, we’ll question the nature of authorship, literary value, and artistic creativity as we dip into early Chaucerian "fan fiction" and examine how the Tales were constructed. And we’ll look at both Chaucer’s source use and modern creative retellings of the Canterbury Tales in order to consider how adaptation can be an act of interpretation as well as remaking. We’ll do all this through close engagement with the texts in their original Middle English, reading aloud frequently and working together through the details that give the poetry its meaning—and its pleasure. By encountering the literature and language of another time, we’ll raise questions about community, gender, race, class, ethics, and more that will help us confront both Chaucer’s past and our present.

ENG 485 - SHAKESPEARE: REVISIONS AND RESOURCES (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 488 - ADVANCED FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 489 - ADVANCED POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 491H - HONORS IN ENGLISH (3 CREDITS)

Ronisha Browdy
Cultural Rhetorics
This course is about interrogating the relationship between rhetoric and culture within rhetorical and composition studies. The objectives of this course are: 1) to offer an overview of cultural rhetorics as a subfield and methodological practice (i.e., what is it and how can we use it?); 2 engage the rhetorical legacies, literacies, and meaning-making practices of under-represented cultural communities; and 3) provide space and opportunities for students to critically-engage the cultural relevance of rhetorical sites of interest and inquiry of their own choosing. At the conclusion of this course students will better understand how to engage rhetoric as an embodied practice that considers the ways culture, identity, point-of-view, experience, background, history, etc. inform all rhetorical situations, as well as some practice in interpreting and using rhetorics and meaning-making practices rooted in specific cultural communities. 

ENG 492 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM STYLES AND GENRES (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Marsha Gordon
ENG 492:001  - "21st Century Documentaries" 
The documentary genre, in long and short form, has flourished and proliferated in ways that nobody could have anticipated fifty years ago. But what happens to the idea of documentary during an age in which the very idea of truth is often called into question? Who gets to tell stories that reach audiences on screens large and small? And what impacts do documentaries actually have? This course will consider these questions through the close study of documentaries made since the turn of the 21 st century, many of them from the last few years. Focused on a range of topics—personal and political, global and local, uplifting and tragic—we will explore how documentary filmmakers make their guiding presence known, as well as how they disguise it. We will read about the stakes of truth telling and the exposé in the modern age and discuss stylistic, narrative, and formal devices used to tell stories grounded in the real world. In addition to writing analytical papers, students will also produce a documentary short on a subject they deem relevant to their lives and our times with the assistance of NC State’s library media-making resources. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with an expectation that all students will actively contribute to our weekly conversations and debates.

Jorge Marí
ENG 492:002  - "Filming in a Time of Emergency: Socio-Environmental Crisis and Alternative Futures Through Film"
This course proposes a conversation on world cinemas and TV in the context of the ongoing socio-environmental emergency and the global systemic collapse. We will discuss whether and how films, filmmakers, critics, and scholars worldwide have responded to, reflected on, or represented the socio-environmental emergency; how they have envisioned the future of their regions, of human civilization and of the planet; how they have (or have not) used the medium to teach the public and to promote social-environmental-political change. Above all, we will consider how futuristic films may serve as agents of subversion, resistance, and enlightenment. A variety of film & TV genres will be considered, including fiction and non-fiction, from sci-fi to horror, action-adventure, disaster, fantasy, and comedy. Students taking the course as FL 495 will have ample opportunities to explore films from the Iberian and Latin American regions. (Crosslisted with FL 495)

ENG 494 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS (3 CREDITS)

Walt Wolfram
ENG 494:001  - "Variety in Language"

Jeffrey Reaser
ENG 494:002  - "Sociolinguistics and Public Science"
This course will examine projects aimed at formal and informal public education about sociolinguistics, including video documentaries, curricula, museum exhibits, podcasts, etc. We will examine the choices academics make in translating their specialized knowledge for the public. All students will then apply their knowledge of sociolinguistics and public science in creating some artifact for the public. Topics may include first language acquisition and teaching, second language learning, bilingualism, clinical assessment and treatment of communication disorders, literacy, language policy, language awareness, etc.


500-level Courses


ENG 505 - WRITING PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION: THEORY, PRACTICE, AND RESEARCH (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Chris Anson
Almost everyone who earns a post-graduate degree in writing or communication studies and pursues a career in higher education will at some point be involved in the administration of a writing program, writing center, or writing-across-the-curriculum effort, and many will become its director. Yet graduate curricula seldom focus on the complex theoretical, pedagogical, political, and managerial dimensions of such work, leaving the new WPA or future writing department chair at the mercy of inherited practice—and much trial and error.

ENG 505 focuses on current theories, research, and practices of writing program administration, including curricular design and assessment, faculty development, assessment of student achievement, budget oversight, the politics of administration in higher education, and historical studies of writing program administration and related administrative work such as the directing of writing centers. The course is designed for all interested MA and PhD students, but will be particularly valuable for those considering any kind of administrative work or curricular oversight in first-year writing programs, writing centers, or WAC/CAC programs at a range of institutions (community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and large research universities). Those with other higher-education interests may also find the administrative focus useful for career enhancement and job preparation.

Students choose a writing program to study based on a list of volunteers and communicate weekly with the director or other administrative personnel in the program, matching their inquiries to the course focus for that week. Each week students give a brief report to the class, which exposes us to a range of practices and local issues. Assignments include a final overview of the program and an exploratory “design your own” project focusing on some aspect of writing program administration in a genre or medium of the student’s choice (website, article, etc.).

ENG 508  - USABILITY STUDIES FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3 CREDITS)

Douglas M. Walls
Our class examines the usability testing of design and web sites as well as a brief introduction to user experience (UX) studies. We will discuss the nature of design and usability especially how they interact to make solutions easy or difficult to use for particular audiences. We will examine a variety of testing including inquiry based, qualitative, and quantitative testing methods. We will discuss the trade-offs among these various types of tests and will analyze which ones are most appropriate for various rhetorical and developmental situations. You will engage in multiple methods for conducting tests when time and funding preclude lab-based testing.

You will conduct several tests and studies on real world websites. Essential parts of the testing process, including planning, getting test subjects, preparing test materials, conducting the test, analyzing the data you collect, and reporting on results and recommendations will all be part of the class. The texts you will read extensively will concern the theories and concepts behind usability testing, the pragmatic practices that inform it, and the place of usability in larger discussions of user experience.

ENG 510 - MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Jim Knowles
This course is a master’s-level introduction to literature in English in the late medieval period, excluding Chaucer. Rather than taking a survey approach, however, we will do a deep dive into the works of three extraordinary writers from the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries: William Langland (pseudonymous author of Piers Plowman); the anonymous Gawain-poet (author of the Arthurian romance Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the dream-elegy called Pearl); and Julian of Norwich (whose book the Revelations of Divine Love is sometimes called the earliest known text by a woman in English; it is much more than that). By limiting our syllabus to these three writers, we will have the opportunity to learn a great deal about the contexts relevant to the critical interpretation of medieval literature. These will include the historical, social, cultural, linguistic, and theological contexts of the late middle ages; modern critical reception and trends in scholarship; and an introduction to the study of manuscript books including paleography, codicology, editorial theory and critical bibliography. All texts in Middle English will be read in the original language. Reading knowledge of Middle English is not a prerequisite. We will work on this skill together. Requirements will include weekly blogging assignments, a presentation on a critical article, a hands-on textual editing project, a final research paper, and active participation in the seminar.

ENG 511 - THEORY AND RESEARCH IN COMPOSITION (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Casie Fedukovich
ENG 511 provides an introduction to foundational theories and research in the field of composition studies. We will focus on the dynamic, and sometimes competing, nature of these theories, keeping in mind the historical and political contexts in which they emerged. The goal of the course is to examine assumptions underlying theory and research and to explore implications for the teaching and practice of writing.

ENG 512 - THEORY AND RESEARCH IN PROFESSIONAL WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 513 - EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN COMPOSITION (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Chris Anson
ENG 513 offers an introduction to basic principles of research design and to a range of qualitative and quantitative methods used to study writing processes, products, and contexts. Recommended for students who have had at least one prior graduate course in composition or technical communication, the course examines the empirical methods cited in the professional literatures of these fields. The course is intended to help students (1) develop a basic understanding of research design needed for reading and evaluating published research in composition and related fields; and (2) assess the goals and limitations of various methods in order to select methods and designs appropriate to their own research questions. 

Coursework includes data analysis projects and design critiques, a brief presentation of a specific method, and a research proposal, including a review of relevant prior research. Requirements will differ for master’s and doctoral students. Doctoral students should register for the affiliated ENG 798 section.

ENG 515 - RHETORIC OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 517 - ADVANCED TECHNICAL WRITING, EDITING AND DOCUMENT DESIGN (3 CREDITS)

Jason Swarts PhD
The purpose of ENG 517 is to introduce students to the rhetorical practices of technical communication, how technical communicators move their readers to beliefs or actions through the skilled use of verbal, visual, and interactive discourse. This course is primarily practice oriented. We will be writing and designing in media and forms that are common to technical communication, including traditional print-based documents (like descriptions and procedures) but also contemporary and technically-challenging formats like images, video, and structured content (DITA). I will also ask you to work on the finer points of your technical style by learning how to write clearly, cohesively, concisely, and concretely. At the end of the semester, you will have the start of a portfolio of writing and design that you can take to an interview.

ENG 520 - SCIENCE WRITING FOR THE MEDIA (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 525 - VARIETY IN LANGUAGE (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 527 - DISCOURSE ANALYSIS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 539 - SEMINAR IN WORLD LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Elaine Orr
This course will focus on literary narratives (fiction and nonfiction) from a number of global locations to help us understand human rights, justice, and ethics. What does it mean not to have access to education, health care, free speech, reproductive freedom, freedom from violence, for example? Students will have an opportunity to help shape the course by making presentations on the historical and cultural contexts for and critical responses to the books we read.

There isn’t a theoretical framework for the course though we may refer to some contemporary theories in our discussion. If and as we employ them, we’ll define terms for general use. The framework is The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Clapman’s Introduction, the cultural/historical/biographical presentations you make, and the what we define as arising from the texts themselves.

Authors/books include Jenny Erpenbeck, Louise Erdrich, Ken Saro-Wiwa. Jose Saramago, Ta-Nahisi Coates, Refuge Tales, Great Britain: Comma Press, Andrew Clapham, Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction, among others.

ENG 558 - STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE (3 CREDITS)

Christopher Crosbie
Shakespeare and His Contemporaries
Shakespeare has become such a cultural icon – arguably, a global cultural icon – that the performance and study of his works risks obscuring the original environment from which they emerged.  To understand that environment – specifically, the theater scene of late sixteenth and early seventeenth-century London – it is helpful to get a working sense of the other playwrights who wrote for the theaters alongside Shakespeare.  Who were they?  What did their plays look like?  How is Shakespeare’s work distinct from theirs, and to what extent is his drama very much of-a-piece with other plays from that era?  In this course, we will read Shakespeare’s work alongside a few representative examples from some of his most notable contemporaries: Thomas Kyd, Ben Jonson, and Christopher Marlowe.  While we will focus predominantly on Shakespeare’s plays, this contextualization will aid our efforts to understand Shakespeare, the production of drama in his time, and the development of the cultural legacies of Renaissance playwrights to our own era.  In addition to robust class discussion, a substantial annotated bibliography, and engaged online conversation, this course will require a final seminar paper.

ENG 565 - AMERICAN REALISM AND NATURALISM (3 CREDITS)

Anne Baker
In this course on fiction of the “Gilded Age,” we will examine major literary works and movements in the United States from 1865 to about 1900.  We will focus on the relationship between cultural contexts (industrialization, urbanization, immigration, the color line, the rise of the “New Woman”) and changing ideas about fiction and its relationship to society.  Authors will include: Twain, Chesnutt, Howells, Chopin, Wharton, Dreiser, Norris, Crane, and James.  Seminar format.  Requirements: active participation, two oral presentations, and a research paper.

ENG 582 - STUDIES IN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Anna Gibson
ENG 582:001 - Subjectivity and Selfhood: Women in Nineteenth-Century British Literature
In this class we will explore how British novelists and other writers shaped what it meant to be a self in the nineteenth century, and to what extent gender shaped representations of that selfhood for women. Our reading will include some familiar names (e.g., Jane Austen, Charlotte Brontë, George Eliot, Bram Stoker) and some who are perhaps less familiar (e.g. Amy Levy, Olive Schreiner, the anonymous author of The Woman of Colour). We will explore our literary texts in light of nineteenth-century theories of selfhood, the mind, mental health, domestic ideology, and legal personhood in order to understand how these novels contributed to modern theories of identity and individual agency, and we will ask how gender, class, race, ethnicity, and sexuality shaped the Victorians’ representations of selfhood and subjectivity.

Barbara A Bennett
ENG 582:002  - Cormac McCarthy
This seminar-style course will study the life and works of Cormac McCarthy from his earliest novel to his most recent work. Students will write a seminar paper and complete a presentation to the class, as well as a series of smaller papers.

ENG 584 - STUDIES IN LINGUISTICS (3 CREDITS)

Jeffrey Reaser
Sociolinguistics and Public Science
This course will examine projects aimed at formal and informal public education about sociolinguistics, including video documentaries, curricula, museum exhibits, podcasts, etc. We will examine the choices academics make in translating their specialized knowledge for the public. All students will then apply their knowledge of sociolinguistics and public science in creating some artifact for the public. Topics may include first language acquisition and teaching, second language learning, bilingualism, clinical assessment and treatment of communication disorders, literacy, language policy, language awareness, etc.

ENG 585 - STUDIES IN FILM (3 CREDITS)

John Stadler
Screen Bodies
Film has from the beginning captured bodies in celluloid, but another mediation of bodies takes place when spectators are hailed into somatic experience. Linda Williams writes of these as body genres--horror, melodrama, hard core--all of which this course will examine with special emphasis on spectatorial mirroring. But there is yet another body to be explored, too, which is the screen body. Turning to the question of the materiality of film, its development through various celluloid gauges, its attunement to a range of goals from realism to spectacle, and its eventual “abandonment” of a body with the arrival of digital technologies (often termed “post-cinema”), this course will also ask what the (im)materiality of screen technologies means for the capacity to represent corporeality. Drawing from affect theory, phenomenology, historical materialism, queer theory, critical race theory, and feminist film theory, this course explores how screen bodies gain legibility, negotiate mimesis, and challenge the experience of experience.

ENG 587 - INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES IN ENGLISH (3 CREDITS)

Andrew Johnston
Methods and Theories in Media Studies
This seminar will explore key theoretical and methodological issues in media studies. We will discuss approaches, paradigms, as well as discourses about media landscapes and objects in order to prepare students to engage in various forms of research. Topics will include historiography, media archaeology, ethnographic approaches to media, cultural hierarchy and taste, formalism and aesthetics, feminist theory, and analyses of political economy and media institutions. We will engage with a variety of media, from broadcast television and cinema to mobile technologies and social networks. By the end of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the approaches covered during the semester with an ability to engage with new approaches encountered later in their scholarship and research. Approaches to various texts and social institutions will be discussed in classes and will be used by students in a research project completed by the end of the semester.

ENG 588 - FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 589 - POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

Eduardo C Corral
An intensive practicum in the writing of poetry: students will write and revise their own poetry, participate in a weekly workshop of evaluation and criticism, and read extensively the work of contemporary poets. This course is designed to give students extensive practice in the writing of poetry – from drafting to revision—and to demonstrate the close relationship between reading and writing through the evaluation of creative work by contemporary poets, as well as original student poetry.

ENG 590 - STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Elaine Orr
Memoir Workshop
This is a course for those who wish to expand their writing repertoire by spending a semester immersed in memoir and related autobiographical forms.  Workshop members will submit work in progress within the genre for in-class criticism and commentary.  The coursework will include deriving lessons from exemplary classical and contemporary memoirs. Early in the semester, we will read a lot. Memoir writing can be an excellent way for fiction and poetry writers to unlock and explore subterranean material that will bring greater richness to their primary genre.  For M.A. students, memoir may be an avenue to greater self-awareness in relation to scholarly writing, and for any writer, memoir is an avenue to hybrid forms.  The course invites experimentation with structure and style. 

ENG 592 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM STYLES AND GENRES

Dr. Marsha Gordon 
21st Century Documentaries
The documentary genre, in long and short form, has flourished and proliferated in ways that nobody could have anticipated fifty years ago. But what happens to the idea of documentary during an age in which the very idea of truth is often called into question? Who gets to tell stories that reach audiences on screens large and small? And what impacts do documentaries actually have? This course will consider these questions through the close study of documentaries made since the turn of the 21 st century, many of them from the last few years. Focused on a range of topics—personal and political, global and local, uplifting and tragic—we will explore how documentary filmmakers make their guiding presence known, as well as how they disguise it. We will read about the stakes of truth telling and the exposé in the modern age and discuss stylistic, narrative, and formal devices used to tell stories grounded in the real world. In addition to writing analytical papers, students will also produce a documentary short on a subject they deem relevant to their lives and our times with the assistance of NC State’s library media-making resources. This course will be conducted as a seminar, with an expectation that all students will actively contribute to our weekly conversations and debates. Only open to English MA students in the Film Concentration.


600-level Courses


ENG 624 - TEACHING COLLEGE COMPOSITION (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 636 - DIRECTED READINGS

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 669 - LITERATURE, METHODS, AND THE PROFESSION (3 CREDITS)

John D Morillo
Methods and the Profession
This course introduces you to the world of research; the current profession; your department and our research and writing expectations for you. Class lectures and discussions will include expanding domains of current research materials available in both print and electronic media; the variety of methods in current English studies. You will become familiar with some of the intellectual endeavors that make up modern research in the humanities, begin your own research, and refine the formal, professional oral and written presentation of your information.

ENG 676 - MASTER'S PROJECT IN ENGLISH (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 695 - MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH 

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Chris Anson
ENG 798:004  - Empirical Research in Composition
ENG 798 offers an introduction to basic principles of research design and to a range of qualitative and quantitative methods used to study writing processes, products, and contexts. Recommended for students who have had at least one prior graduate course in composition or technical communication, the course examines the empirical methods cited in the professional literatures of these fields.

The course is intended to help students (1) develop a basic understanding of research design needed for reading and evaluating published research in composition and related fields; and (2) assess the goals and limitations of various methods in order to select methods and designs appropriate to their own research questions.

Coursework includes data analysis projects and design critiques, a brief presentation of a specific method, and a research proposal, including a review of relevant prior research. Requirements will differ for master’s and doctoral students.

Andrew Johnston
ENG 798:010  - Methods and Theories in Media Studies
This seminar will explore key theoretical and methodological issues in media studies. We will discuss approaches, paradigms, as well as discourses about media landscapes and objects in order to prepare students to engage in various forms of research. Topics will include historiography, media archaeology, ethnographic approaches to media, cultural hierarchy and taste, formalism and aesthetics, feminist theory, and analyses of political economy and media institutions. We will engage with a variety of media, from broadcast television and cinema to mobile technologies and social networks. By the end of this course, students will have a thorough understanding of the approaches covered during the semester with an ability to engage with new approaches encountered later in their scholarship and research. Approaches to various texts and social institutions will be discussed in classes and will be used by students in a research project completed by the end of the semester.


800-level Courses


ENG 810 - DIRECTED READINGS IN ENGLISH STUDIES 

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course


HON


200-level Courses


HON 202: Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature

Paul Fyfe
Data and the Human
We are living in the era of big data. At the same time, big data is shaping how we live, how we define the boundaries of private and public selves, how we make decisions, and how we are governed and manipulated. In other words, “data” no longer refers to electronic information alone, but to the emerging conditions that are redefining our humanity. This seminar invites students to identify and understand these changes across contexts including democracy and surveillance, identity and algorithms, education, artificial intelligence, and the environment. We will read a range of materials from science fiction to tech journalism to cultural studies. Additionally, with the help of hands-on workshops, we will try several entry-level experiments with data, from trying to acquire and control our own personal data, to visualizing and researching open data sets, to writing papers with the help of text-generating AI. No previous experience or special technical skills are required beyond basic familiarity with a computer. Ultimately, the course aims to develop students' critical data literacy for a data-driven age.

HON 293: Honors Special Topics - Interdisciplinary Perspectives/Global Knowledge

John Morillo
Ludmilla Jordanova noted that “virtually everything in our culture conspires to reinforce a separation between the study of science and the pursuit of the humanities, both of which are needed to understand the social and cultural history of science” (Science and Literature 1986). This course tracks the imaginative potentials, social repercussions, and interdisciplinary mixing of literature and science from the seventeenth to the twenty-first century. Well before literature and science divided into "two cultures" they supplied a fruitful crossover for ideas about how and why the world works and how we gain new knowledge. Even with the development of modern disciplines, literature plays an important role in cultural assessments of scientific discovery and education. Students will read a selection of works from literary as well as scientific writers, analyzing texts and historical contexts and producing written arguments within an interdisciplinary framework. Authors may include Margaret Cavendish from the 17th century, Gilbert White (18th century); Mary Shelley, Charles Darwin, T. H. Huxley, and H. G. Wells (19th century); Francis Galton, Aldous Huxley, Jerome Lawrence and Robert Lee (20th-century), and Verlyn Klikenborg (21st century). This HON 293 will present primary historical sources from scientific writers as well as more traditionally literary texts, including fiction, poems, and plays from all genres together, letting students realize connections while the instructor provides additional context necessary to understand the emergence and development of scientific ideas and literary culture. Science writing will draw from biology and natural history; however, no prior technical scientific knowledge is assumed. Unifying themes include the development of and responses to the theory of evolution, and women writing about science. Classroom exercises and discussions will be structured to help students develop and implement skills in analysis of scientific and literary texts, including analysis of writing, interpretation, critical thinking, and contextual argument.