CORE FACULTY

Franklin Cason

 
​Assistant Professor, English
Office: 248 Tompkins 

Dr. Franklin Cason Jr. is a filmmaker and film scholar, who has taught courses in film theory, history, aesthetics, criticism, and analysis. His research interests have been primarily concerned with film, modern visual culture, and media studies. As such, his writing and artistic practice reaches across the disciplines of art history, film studies, digital multimedia, graphic novels, philosophy, sociology, literature, musicology, aesthetic theory, visual studies, and historical poetics. His most recent essay, “Symbiopsychotaxiplasticity: Some Takes on William Greaves,” co-authored with Tsitsi Jaji, was recently published in Cultural Studies (28:4, 2014), in a special issue on Theorizing Production, edited by John Jackson. Currently, he is at work on an intellectual biographical documentary on African American Philosopher Alain Locke, and completing a book on the institutional context of the politics and aesthetics of African American films. 

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Susan Emshwiller

 
Lecturer, English
Office: 305 Tompkins

Susan Emshwiller is a writer and director for both screen and stage and has worked in the Hollywood film industry for many years. Ms. Emshwiller has written many screenplays including for the Academy-Award winning film “Pollock” for actor/director Ed Harris. As a set decorator she worked with directors such as David Mamet and Robert Altman. In“The Player” she was also a featured actress. Having worked as a writer, director, producer, actor, editor, and set decorator, she brings real world experience to her screenwriting classes and practical knowledge of the process of getting words from the page to the screen. Before moving to North Carolina, Ms. Emshwiller taught screenwriting for several years at The Met Theatre in Los Angeles. She has won awards for her scripts, short films, PSAs, music videos, commercials, and feature film “In the Land of Milk and Money.” Her published works include the plays "Dominoes" and “Defrosting Popsicles.”

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Ora Gelley

 
Associate Professor, English
Office: 225 Tompkins

Dr. Ora Gelley joined the NCSU Film Studies faculty in the fall of 2008. Dr. Gelley holds a Ph.D. in English (cinema and media studies emphasis) from the University of Chicago. Before coming to NCSU she taught at the University of California-Irvine, Dartmouth College, Tulane University, and Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey. Her book, Stardom and the Aesthetics of Neorealism: Ingrid Bergman in Rossellini's Italy was published in 2012 by Routledge. Her current research project is focused on Violence and "Counterviolence" in New European Cinema.  Her essays have appeared and/or are forthcoming  in  Camera ObscuraFilm StudiesCritical InquiryFilm CriticismCinema Journal, and Films for the Feminist Classroom.

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Marsha Gordon

 
Professor, English
Office: 257 Tompkins; 515-4164

Since joining the film studies faculty in 2002, Marsha Gordon has taught courses in Women & Film, 1950s American Film, Studio Era Hollywood, Warner Bros. in the Golden Age, Cinema Stylists: Nicholas Ray, Douglas Sirk, Sam Fuller, The Musical, History of Film to 1940, African American Film, International Crime Film, Introduction to Film, Film & Literature, War Documentaries, and The American War Film. Her research interests include stardom and movie fan culture through the studio era; the birth and decline of the Hollywood studio system; Sam Fuller, Ida Lupino, and other independent filmmakers of the 1940s and 1950s; orphan films, especially of the educational variety; and the intersections between film and other art forms, such as literature.

Dr. Gordon’s new book, Film is Like a Battleground: Sam Fuller’s War Movies, was published in February 2017 by Oxford University Press. She is also the co-editor, with Dr. Allyson Nadia Field (University of Chicago), of Screening Race in American Nontheatrical Film, a collection of essays that is under contract to Duke University Press. She is the author of Hollywood Ambitions: Celebrity in the Movie Age (2008) and numerous articles in such journals as The Velvet Light Trap, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, Film Quarterly, Cinema Journal, and The Moving Image. She is the co-editor of Learning With the Lights Off: Educational Film in the United States, (Oxford University Press, 2012). Dr. Gordon is a former co-editor The Moving Image (University of Minnesota Press), the Journal of the Association of Moving Image Archivists. Dr. Gordon has a monthly show, "Movies on the Radio," with Laura Boyes & Frank Stasio, on 91.5/WUNC's The State of Things.

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Dr. Gordon's webpage: http://marshagordon99.wix.com/filmprof

Adam Hart

 
​Lecturer, English
Office: G116  Tompkins

   
Adam Hart holds a PhD in Cinema and Media Studies from the University
of Chicago. From 2014-2016, he was a postdoctoral College Fellow in
the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies at Harvard. He is
currently working on two manuscripts, one about the form of horror
films and video games, and a history and theory of handheld
cinematography. At NCSU, he will be teaching Intro to Film Studies and
a course on Horror Cinema.

Send email to Dr. Adam Hart

Andrew R. Johnston

Assistant Professor, English
Office: 278 Tompkins; 919-515-4148

   
I am an Assistant Professor in the Department of English and teach in the Film Studies Program as well as the PhD program in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media. Previously, I taught in the Film and Media Studies Program and English Department at Amherst College. My research and teaching areas include film history and theory, animation, avant-garde film, color aesthetics, media archaeology, and areas of the digital humanities such as the history of computational technologies and digital archives. My forthcoming book, Pulses of Abstraction: Episodes from a History of Animation (University of Minnesota Press), is a theoretical and historical investigation of abstract animation in cinema and computational media from the 1950s through the 1970s. Highlighting a rich array of graphic techniques, such as etching directly onto the filmstrip, generating rapid, discontinuous montage sequences, or using digital vector displays and programming technologies, I argue that this aesthetic explores the parameters and contours of an expanded media landscape while offering the material out of which a more inclusive, flexible, and dynamic account of cinema can be built. I am also currently writing a series of articles about the historical development of Computer-Generated Imagery from the 1960s through the 1980s and methods of archiving and transcoding these works on contemporary platforms.
  
I have a PhD in Cinema and Media Studies from the University of Chicago. In addition to my book, my research on film history, aesthetic theory, media archaeology, and avant-garde film has appeared in books and journals such as Animating Film Theory, Color and the Moving ImageAnimation: Behind the Silver Screen, and Discourse: Journal for Theoretical Studies in Media and Culture.
   
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Devin Orgeron

 
​Associate Professor, English
Office: 226 Tompkins; 515-0262

Professor Devin Orgeron teaches Film Theory, Film History Since 1940, The New American Director, International Film and Realism, Documentary, and a series of courses focused on specific decades in international film and media history (70s, 80s, 90s). He also teaches a range of director-focused courses covering filmmakers such as Alfred Hitchcock, François Truffaut, Howard Hawks, and the Coen Brothers. Dr. Orgeron researches and writes about cinema and mechanical mobility; cinematic masculinity; contemporary American cinema; film authorship; realism; advertising and commercial images; educational films; and postmodernity. He also collects, shows, and writes about home movies from the 1940s-1960s.

Dr. Orgeron is the author of Road Movies: From Muybridge and Melies to Lynch and Kiarostami (2008). His articles have appeared in Cinema Journal, The Velvet Light Trap, The Moving Image, The Journal of Film and Video, CineAction, College Literature, Post Script, and Film Quarterly. He is the co-editor of Learning With the Lights Off: Educational Film in the United States, (Oxford University Press, 2012). Dr. Orgeron is the former co-editor of The Moving Image (University of Minnesota Press), the Journal of the Association of Moving Image Archivists -- currently co-chairs that organization's publication committee.
Sample Syllabi & Dr. Orgeron's CV
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Website


AFFILIATED FACULTY

Jim Alchediak

Senior Lecturer, Communication
Office: 101-A Winston Hall; (919) 515-9740

Professor Alchediak has taught a variety of media courses since joining the Communication Department in 1979. An active educational video producer, his geography series Living in Our World has been distributed internationally. Professor Alchediak regularly teaches Digital Video Production (Com 357) and Advanced Video Production (Com 437).
Send email to Professor Alchediak

Wilton Barnhardt

Director of Creative Writing and Associate Professor, English
Office: 276 Tompkins; (919) 515-4129

Dr. Barnhardt is the author of three novels (Show World, Gospel, and Emma Who Saved My Life) and numerous short stories and essays. He teaches screenwriting (Eng 433) and advanced screenwriting (Eng 492).
Send email to Dr. Barnhardt

Patrick FitzGerald

Associate Professor, Art & Design
Office: 276 Tompkins; (919) 515-4129

Professor FitzGerald's multimedia work has been exhibited across the United States and Japan. As director of the IntelliMedia Initiative for the College of Design at NCSU, FitzGerald's research and teaching span the full range of multimedia production, from digital video to interactive 3D animation.  Professor FitzGerald has received national and international awards for his digital illustrations. He teaches Digital Imaging (ADN 219) and an Animation Seminar (ADN 289).
Send email to Professor FitzGerald

Nathaniel Isaacson

Assistant Professor,
Foreign Languages and Literatures

Nathaniel Isaacson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature, where he teaches courses in Chinese language, Chinese cultural studies, literature and cinema. His research interests include Chinese science fiction, intellectual history, and visual culture. Nathaniel's current research focuses on science fiction cinema and cultural production in the post-Mao era. His forthcoming article, "Media and Messages: Blurred Visions of Nation and Science in 'Death Ray on a Coral Island,'" which examines the many media incarnations of Tong Enzheng's post-socialist Sci-Fi thriller, will appear in Simultaneous Worlds: Global Science Fiction Cinema.
Send e-mail to Professor Isaacson

Jorge Mari

Associate Professor,
Foreign Languages and Literatures
Office: Withers 217

Dr. Marí's research has focused mostly on 20th & 21st-centuries Spanish cultural studies and Spanish cinema, as well as intermedial studies (film-lit interactions) and Spain-U.S. relations. He is the author of Lecturas espectaculares (2003), a book on the manifestations of cinema in the contemporary Spanish novel, and has recently co-edited Ventanas sobre el Atlántico (2011), a volume of essays on the political, artistic, and cultural relations of Spain and the U.S.A. Dr. Marí has taught at Duke University and at the Université de Lyon (France) and has lectured internationally on Spanish culture, literature, and Trans- Atlantic cinemas (Spanish, Latin American, and U.S.). He has been a member of the organizing committee of the Latin American Film & Video festival of North Carolina since 1997. He is currently working on a volume on contemporary Spanish Thriller & Horror films.
Visit Dr. Mari's website
Send email to Dr. Mari

Sarah Stein

Associate Professor, Communication
Office: 201 Winston ; (919) 515-2450

Prior to joining the faculty at NCSU in 1995, Dr. Stein worked in documentary filmmaking for 25 years and has edited a number of award winning films, including two that won Academy Awards and one that won an Emmy. She has taught film production at NYU's film school and at the University of Iowa.  Dr. Stein regularly teaches Introduction to Film Production (Com 344), which is a requirement for Film Studies majors.
Send email to Dr. Stein.