Summer 2021 Courses

Explore our course offerings for Summer 2021.



ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH (4 CREDITS)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.


200-level Courses


ENG 202 - DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES IN WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 208 - STUDIES IN FICTION (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 209 - INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE (3 CREDITS)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 214 - INTRODUCTION TO EDITING (3 CREDITS)

Paul Isom

The purpose of the course is to teach editing skills that will help the student understand the concepts and the culture of editing for print and digital publications. The course will also help the student be a more effective editor in a number of contexts, including editing his or her own work, the work of others, professionally and non-professionally.

ENG 220 - STUDIES IN GREAT WORKS OF NON-WESTERN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Meredith G. Fosque

“Studies in Great Works of Western Literature”

Readings, in English translation, of Western literary masterpieces from the beginnings of literacy in the Middle East and Europe towards the present, including such authors as Homer, Sophocles, Aristotle, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, Shakespeare, Rousseau, Blake, Dickinson, Tolstoy, Rilke, Proust, Kafka, and Borges.

ENG 232 - LITERATURE AND MEDICINE (3 CREDITS)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD

This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 248 - SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 251 - MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 261 - ENGLISH LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

James Robert Knowles

This course is an introduction to English literature of the medieval and early modern periods, covering a 500-year period from the late twelfth century to the late seventeenth century. We will read a selection of major writers and texts from the Anglo-Norman period (Marie de France), the Middle English period (the Gawain poet, Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe), the English Renaissance (Shakespeare), and the seventeenth century (Donne, Herbert, Milton). Our approach to reading and discussing these texts will be twofold. First, the aesthetic approach to reading asks us to recognize these poems and plays as works of art with transhistorical value and enduring appeal. Secondly, the historical approach to reading literature asks us to understand the same texts as cultural objects which are deeply embedded in the times, places, and circumstances of their creation. Part of our task will be to recognize how and when our own twenty-first-century moral and aesthetic impulses (what we find beautiful or moving or offensive) diverge from (or converge with) those of the writers we are studying. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts on their own terms and to situate texts within their original cultural contexts. For CHASS majors, fulfills Literature I requirement. Fulfills GEP Humanities credit (3 hours).

Timothy Stinson


This course is an introduction to English literature from the earliest surviving records through the year 1660, with a focus on major writers and works. Texts and authors will be situated in their respective cultural and historical contexts, with an emphasis on how literature both responded to and participated in important historical and social developments in England. We will also focus on becoming familiar with a number of literary terms, techniques, genres, and forms, including prose, verse forms, and drama.

ENG 262 - ENGLISH LITERATURE II (3 CREDITS)

Anna Gibson

This survey of English literature begins in the late 1700s and brings us to the mid-20th century taking us on a journey through the poetry, fiction, drama, and prose of major British writers. Along the way we will focus our attention on three literary movements/periods: Romanticism, the Victorian era, and Modernism. Studying works of literature in the context of these movements will allow us to listen to the writers’ conversations and disagreements across and within these literary categories and to situate these conversations within the changing landscape of British cultural history. How did literary texts respond to massive social changes such as industrialization, a growing population, the rise of cities, shifting gender roles and social classes, and two world wars? And how did these texts shape people’s experiences of such changes? How did writers across this time period offer new ways of thinking about the relationship between self and world? We will ask these questions as we read works by such central writers as Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Austen, Brontë, Rossetti, Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Rhys. This class will be online asynchronous with lessons posted and work due twice a week in the form of short quizzes, annotations, reading responses, and virtual discussion. Assignments include unit tests, two short papers, and two small creative or reflective projects.

ENG 266 - AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 282 - INTRODUCTION TO FILM (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 288 - FICTION WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 292 - WRITING ABOUT FILM (3 CREDITS)

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300-level Courses



ENG 305 - WOMEN AND LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Margaret Simon 

"Women and Gender in Comics"

Wonder Woman. She’s the first woman superhero most people think of. And her history is pretty incredible. But she is not the first, nor is she the only, powerful female superhero or comics lead. Across the course of the twentieth century women, especially, and to a lesser extent LGBTQIA+ characters and comics creators took a more prominent role in the industry. Since the turn of the millennium, the presence particularly of LGBTQIA+ and cis-gendered women has increased and diversified at the level of character, creator, editors, and readership. How has this shift shaped (or reshaped) how individuals along a complex gender spectrum are written and visually represented in such texts? How are comics and graphic novels being defined by a more broadly diverse creative community, including a variety of minority voices? What perspectives on gender and sexuality are put forth in comics? What affordances and constraints do comics provide in presenting complex body narratives? How do we evaluate comics and graphic literature in a literature class? In order to help us delve into the big ideas these texts raise, we’ll read a variety of mainstream and experimental graphic fiction, gender theory, and media theory, in addition to undertaking hands-on drawing activities, archival research, and hearing from several guest speakers.

ENG 323 - WRITING IN THE RHETORICAL TRADITIONS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 331 - COMMUNICATION FOR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing

This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - COMMUNICATION FOR SCIENCE AND RESEARCH (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 340 - LITERATURE, ART, AND SOCIETY (3 CREDITS)

Timothy Stinson

"Heaven, Hell, and the Afterlife"

This course surveys some of the great works of literature focused on heaven, hell, and the afterlife, including classical works such as Homer’s Odyssey and Virgil’s Aeneid, European works from the medieval through modern eras, including Dante’s Divine Comedy, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Blake’s Marriage of Heaven and Hell, and diverse accounts of the afterlife from world literature, such as “The Descent of Inanna from the Great Above to the Great Below" (Sumer) and “The Feather of Maat” (Egypt). These will be paired with visual depictions of the afterlife, such as renderings of The Last Judgment (showing both heaven and hell) by Giotto, Bosch, and Michelangelo and Egyptian and classical funerary art.


ENG 376 - SCIENCE FICTION (3 CREDITS)

Paul Fyfe

“Science Fiction and Steampunk”

"Science Fiction and Steampunk" explores the provocations of science and technology to the literary imagination. This seminar analyzes responses to historical shifts in technology, from nineteenth-century reactions to steam engines and telegraphy to more contemporary “steampunk” reworkings of the past. Students will gain an understanding of the genealogy of science fiction, investigate its creative adaptation in “punk” subcultures, and assess how they reveal perspectives on communication, ethics, gender, and race. The course also considers how the genre of science fiction evolves through different mediums, from historical texts to graphic novels to films to video games to fan conventions to fabricated objects. Across all of our materials, students will use a critical thinking toolkit for literary study and media analysis, producing daily writing assignments, a class presentation, a prototype steampunk object in collaboration with the NC State University Libraries Makerspace, and a final paper.

ENG 377 - FANTASY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 382 - FILM AND LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 395 - STUDIES IN RHETORIC AND DIGITAL MEDIA (3 CREDITS)

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400-level Courses



ENG 448 - AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 487 - SHAKESPEARE, THE LATER PLAYS (3 CREDITS)

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500-level Courses


ENG 548 - AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 558 - STUDIES IN SHAKESPEARE (3 CREDITS)

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600-level Courses


ENG 636 - DIRECTED READINGS

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