Spring 2021 Courses

Explore our course offerings for the Spring 2021 semester. 

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - ACADEMIC WRITING AND RESEARCH (4 CREDITS)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

200-level Courses


ENG 202 - DISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES IN WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 207 - STUDIES IN POETRY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 208 - STUDIES IN FICTION (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 209 - INTRODUCTION TO SHAKESPEARE (3 CREDITS)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 214 - INTRODUCTION TO EDITING (3 CREDITS)

Paul Rodman Cockshutt Jr

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Paul Isom

The purpose of the course is to teach editing skills that will help the student understand the concepts and the culture of editing for print and digital publications. The course will also help the student be a more effective editor in a number of contexts, including editing his or her own work, the work of others, professionally and non-professionally.

Christa Williams Gala

A nuts-and-bolts class for editing different kinds of writing in the workplace--and your own. Master the mechanics of grammar, punctuation and AP Style and implement those skills to make copy more concise and interesting. We'll also cover headline writing and the telltale signs of biased writing, libel and fake news. Learn how to fact-check, edit and rework copy with a discerning eye.

ENG 219 - STUDIES IN GREAT WORKS OF NON-WESTERN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Meredith G. Fosque

“Traditional Non-Western Literature”

Readings in traditional literature, in translation, from Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas.  Students will be introduced to the origins and flourishing of these oldest cultures through the oral and written stories, poems, essays and plays that have become the defining works of these societies.  At the same time we will look at the geographical, historical, and philosophical contexts from which these texts arise. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 221 - LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD I (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 222 - LITERATURE OF THE WESTERN WORLD II (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 223 - CONTEMPORARY WORLD LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 232 - LITERATURE AND MEDICINE (3 CREDITS)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD

This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 248 - SURVEY OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 251 - MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 252 - MAJOR AMERICAN WRITERS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 255 - BEYOND BRITAIN: LITERATURE COLONIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 260 - READING LITERATURE AND EXPLORING TEXTUALITY (3 CREDITS)

Antony Harrison

Fully online and synchronous, this course introduces approaches to reading understanding, and writing about literary texts of all genres (drama, fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose). Students will study critical and theoretical methodologies to help them develop analytical skills that are basic to success in the English major.

ENG 261 - ENGLISH LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

Paul Broyles

This course traverses the first thousand years of English literature (from the mid-7th century to 1667), taking in a wide variety of genres and charting major authors and key literary developments. From Beowulf’s reanimation of a fading heroic past to Margaret Cavendish’s dazzling sci-fi vision of another world, we will see how literature makes and remakes the world with its changing needs and dreams as it responds to upheavals like invasion, pandemic, and social transformation. We will examine the formal, aesthetic aspects that allow literary texts to resonate across time and move us even today; we will also place the works in their historical contexts, exploring how literary texts respond to their environments, and how they might help reshape society. As the semester progresses, we will develop vocabulary and technical skills that allow us to describe very precisely how literature does the things it does.

William P Shaw PhD

A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

James Robert Knowles

This course is an introduction to English literature of the medieval and early modern periods, covering a 500-year period from the late twelfth century to the late seventeenth century. We will read a selection of major writers and texts from the Anglo-Norman period (Marie de France), the Middle English period (the Gawain poet, Chaucer, Julian of Norwich, and Margery Kempe), the English Renaissance (Shakespeare), and the seventeenth century (Donne, Herbert, Milton). Our approach to reading and discussing these texts will be twofold. First, the aesthetic approach to reading asks us to recognize these poems and plays as works of art with transhistorical value and enduring appeal. Secondly, the historical approach to reading literature asks us to understand the same texts as cultural objects which are deeply embedded in the times, places, and circumstances of their creation. Part of our task will be to recognize how and when our own twenty-first-century moral and aesthetic impulses (what we find beautiful or moving or offensive) diverge from (or converge with) those of the writers we are studying. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts on their own terms and to situate texts within their original cultural contexts. For CHASS majors, fulfills Literature I requirement. Fulfills GEP Humanities credit (3 hours).

ENG 262 - ENGLISH LITERATURE II (3 CREDITS)

Anna Gibson

This survey of English literature begins in the late 1700s and brings us to the mid-20th century, taking us on a journey through the poetry, fiction, drama, and prose of major British writers. Along the way we will focus our attention on three literary movements/periods: Romanticism, the Victorian era, and Modernism. Studying works of literature in the context of these movements will allow us to listen to the writers’ conversations and disagreements across and within these literary categories and to situate these conversations within the changing landscape of British cultural history. How did literary texts respond to massive social changes such as industrialization, a growing population, the rise of cities, shifting gender roles and social classes, and two world wars? And how did these texts shape people’s experiences of such changes? How did writers across this time period offer new ways of thinking about the relationship between self and world? We will ask these questions as we read works by such central writers as Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Austen, Brontë, Rossetti, Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Rhys. This class will be online asynchronous with lessons posted and work due twice a week in the form of short quizzes, annotations, reading responses, and virtual discussion. Assignments include unit tests, two short papers, and two small creative or reflective projects.

ENG 265 - AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 266 - AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 267 - LGBTQI LITERATURE IN THE U.S. (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 275 - LITERATURE AND WAR (3 CREDITS)

Meredith G. Fosque

We will explore how people speak of, reflect on, and tell stories about war in the context of history and the evolving technology of conflict. This course looks at writings about the experience of war both historically and thematically and does so from multiple perspectives: literary, historical and technological. Issues will include the nature and purpose of war, the role of weaponry in dictating battle, the question of a just war, the theory of deterrence, and an examination of the soldier. Texts include Sun Tzu, The Iliad, Tales of the Heike, Patrick O'Brien’s The Ionian Mission, American, British, Russian, and Japanese views of World Wars I and II, Spycraft, Holmstedt's Band of Sisters, and Shepherd’s R&R. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 282 - INTRODUCTION TO FILM (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 287 - EXPLORATIONS IN CREATIVE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 288 - FICTION WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 289 - POETRY WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - WRITING ABOUT FILM (3 CREDITS)

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300-level Courses


ENG 305 - WOMEN AND LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Anna Gibson

In this class we will explore women’s literature, and women in literature, from the nineteenth century to the present by using as our thematic focus the idea of home. Our broad theme will allow us to explore how texts from a variety of cultural contexts address what it means to be at home (or not at home) in a space, a body, a community, a nation, a social category, a mind. We will consider how our chosen literary texts explore questions about domesticity, entrapment, and marginalization; about belonging, identity, and citizenship; about femininity, privacy, and secrecy; about safety, comfort, and stability. We will explore the topic of gender as it intersects with sex, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, class, citizenship, and mental health. Authors may be selected from the following: Charlotte Brontë, Virginia Woolf, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Kate Chopin, Alice Walker, Audre Lorde, Lucille Clifton, Octavia Butler, Margaret Atwood, Maxine Hong Kingston, Sandra Cisneros, Nalo Hopkinson, Jesymn Ward, Chimamanda Adichie, Bernardine Evaristo, Yaa Ngasi, Vivek Shraya, and Beyoncé. The course will meet synchronously over Zoom.

ENG 316 - INTRODUCTION TO NEWS AND ARTICLE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Christa Williams Gala

Learn how to write concise stories about events and people with a special focus on the tenets of media writing, including writing leads, establishing story angles, interviewing and research, quote gathering, editing and fact-checking. Students will learn the difference between writing for print and digital platforms and practice through writing their own stories, including articles and profiles. Regular quizzes on AP Style and current events will be given.

Paul Isom

This course is designed to develop and hone skills in fact gathering and writing. The student must demonstrate competence in collecting information and interpreting and communicating that information in news style. Special emphasis is given to news judgment and collecting information from primary and secondary sources; story structure, writing quality, proper grammar and spelling, editing and revising, speed with accuracy and clarity; and responsibility in reporting.

ENG 317 - DESIGNING NETWORKED COMMUNICATIONS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 323 - WRITING IN THE RHETORICAL TRADITIONS

Ronisha Browdy

This course uses western rhetorical concepts, theories, and practices to offer students opportunities to analyze persuasive texts, and compose rhetorical texts of their own. It provides an overview of rhetorical concepts like rhetorical situation, rhetorical appeals, rhetorical devices, and rhetorical canon. It also tasks students to conduct analyses of written, oral, and visual texts from a variety of contexts, genres, and mediums, and compose their own persuasive texts for a variety of audiences and purposes.

ENG 325 - SPOKEN AND WRITTEN TRADITIONS OF AMERICAN ENGLISH DIALECTS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 326 - HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3 CREDITS)

Erik Thomas

ENG 326 will cover the known history that lies behind the English language, from Indo-European to the present day. After an introduction to linguistic terminology and writing systems, the course explores Indo-European, some of the controversies surrounding it, and structures of it that are important to understanding later developments. It then discusses Proto-Germanic and Ingvaeonic Germanic, how they relate to Indo-European and Old English, and the cultural setting associated with them. Next, the coverage of Old English includes its linguistic structure, the Anglo-Saxon and Viking invasions, and an introduction to Old English literature. With Middle English, the course examines the impact of the Norman invasion and other factors on the language and how English ultimately prevailed over French, accompanied by a glimpse at Middle English literature. The Modern English period begins with the Great Vowel Shift and covers various innovations in linguistic structure, as well as the standardization of English and the development of American English. Students also analyze a period play from late Middle or early Modern English, affording them a view of both linguistic and literary developments.

ENG 327 - LANGUAGE AND GENDER (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 330 - SCREENWRITING (3 CREDITS)

Susan Emshwiller

Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, and writing we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. As each week’s specific elements are presented—structure, characterization, dialogue, subtext, theme, exposition, etc. —participants will write short scenes focusing on that topic and share these for non-judgmental feedback. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and, with the in-class and assignment writings, will have created an original work-in-progress screenplay.

ENG 331 - COMMUNICATION FOR ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - COMMUNICATION FOR BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing

This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - COMMUNICATION FOR SCIENCE AND RESEARCH (3 CREDITS)

Prerequisite: Junior standing

This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 338 - SPEECH SCIENCE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 340 - LITERATURE, ART, AND SOCIETY (3 CREDITS)

Jennifer Anne Nolan

This course will examine intersections between the literary and visual arts in the first half of the twentieth century in popular magazines, such as the Saturday Evening Post and The Crisis, in artistic movements, such as Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, and in William Faulkner’s literature and the cinematic adaptation of one of his most commercially successful novels, Intruder in the Dust (1948).

As the twentieth century began, literary and visual artists found themselves with unprecedented opportunities for their work to be seen and their voices to be heard. Advances in printing technologies brought popular magazines into the homes of millions, where poetry, short stories, illustrations, photographs, investigative journalism, and criticism intermingled in what was the mass culture of the day. Modernist experimentation in literature found inspiration in the visual arts, and illustrations and other visual materials framed and interpreted fiction and poetry in spaces like the Saturday Evening Post, whose popularity and reach finds its modern-day equivalent in streaming services like Netflix, and The Crisis, the official magazine of the newly-formed NAACP (edited by W.E.B. Du Bois). Many of these strands are brought together in the work of Nobel laureate William Faulkner, who was immersed in this landscape. Though notorious now for his lengthy sentences, he gained notoriety as a young man for shirking his duties at the post office to read magazines like the Post, and his work combines elements of popular and modernist literature with incisive social critique. Throughout, we will consider how each artist comments upon, represents, challenges, and critiques prevailing social issues of their day.

Due to the size of our class, for most of the semester each student will participate in one synchronous session and complete one set of asynchronous activities per week. Students will be placed into groups the first week of class and will be asked to attend their synchronous sessions on the same day each week.

ENG 350 - PROFESSIONAL INTERNSHIPS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 372 - AMERICAN POETRY, TWENTIETH CENTURY AND BEYOND (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 374 - HISTORY OF FILM FROM 1940 (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 375 - AFRICAN AMERICAN CINEMA (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 376 - SCIENCE FICTION (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 377 - FANTASY (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Brian Blackley

A survey of representative works in the genre of fantasy examining characters from Beowulf to Bilbo Baggins. Primary focus on the heroic quest, including the search for revelation/transformation, the demands and types of leadership, the value of supporting figures (the wise old man, the good mother/goddess, the helper), and the supernatural/magical as key to success in the supreme ordeal. Prior reading of works by J. R. R. Tolkien and J. K. Rowling recommended (due to reading load) but not required. There will be two tests, multiple quizzes, and an essay.

ENG 381 - CREATIVE NONFICTION WRITING WORKSHOP - (3 CREDITS)

Cat Warren and Misha Lazzara

Prerequisite: ENG 215, 287, 288, or 289. 

A workshop in creative nonfiction (literary or magazine journalism) for the student with demonstrated understanding of the basic techniques of creative writing and journalism.

This course is an advanced introduction and a practicum for writing creative nonfiction, long-form journalism, or, more familiarly, magazine-style journalism. These are pieces that you might find in Harper’s, The New Yorker, Texas Monthly, Slate, Wired, Rolling Stone, Orion, Outdoor, Longreads, California Sunday magazine, Atlantic, Smithsonian magazine, Wired, Grist, Atlas Obscura, The New York Times magazine. Creative nonfiction is a broad category: the thought-piece, the big idea piece, the extended profile, the travel story, the memoir.

Creative nonfiction should emerge from deeply researched reporting, but also entertain and enlighten in a literary fashion: the best of both worlds, ideally. As Lee Gutkind said, “True stories, well told.” We will—through extensive reading, in-class assignments, two longish exercises, guest lecturers, and a final project—explore, conceive, research, hone, and produce creative nonfiction. Note that while we’ve included memoir in this category, and while many pieces of wonderful creative nonfiction include a personal voice, and more than a touch of memoir, this class is not devoted to memoir, but to telling other kinds of stories.

ENG 382 - FILM AND LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 388 - INTERMEDIATE FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 389 - INTERMEDIATE POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 390 - CLASSICAL BACKGROUNDS OF ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Paul Broyles

“It’s an old song,” the 2019 Tony-winning musical tells us in the opening lines, and it’s true: Hadestown, a love story set in the Depression-era South, is just the latest in a chain of retellings of the classical myth of Orpheus and Eurydice that stretches back for millennia. In this course, we will explore how English literature absorbs, adapts, and responds to Greek and Latin classics. We will take up influential works of classical literature by authors like Homer and Ovid (read, of course, in translation), and will trace their transformation as later authors react to them in a wide variety of forms and genres as varied as medieval romance, lyric poetry, novels, computerized interactive fiction, and musical theatre. We’ll consider how old literary works transform under the pressures of new eras, how authors repurpose classical writing for their own ends, and what sorts of things the classics meant to later authors who stole from, referenced, and reworked them. “It’s an old song,” Hadestown declares, “and we’re going to sing it again.” Why have authors continued to sing the old songs of classical literature over so many centuries, and how have they made them new? That’s the question we’ll take up together in this class as we trace stories, techniques, and ideas through time.

ENG 393 - STUDIES IN LITERARY GENRE (3 CREDITS)

Sujata S. Mody

MODERN HINDI-URDU SHORT STORY

This course provides a focused treatment of the modern short story in Hindi/Urdu. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre from the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern genre in the colonial and nationalist periods in South Asian literary history; students will also be introduced to some writing from India and Pakistan in the post-Independence era. All readings are available in English translation.

ENG 394 - STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 395 - STUDIES IN RHETORIC AND DIGITAL MEDIA (3 CREDITS)

David Reider

ENG 395:001 Interactive Stories

The focus of 395 this spring is learning how to design and publish visual or graphic stories using Ren'Py. Ren'Py (https://www.renpy.org/) is a visual story engine that works across platforms (Windows, HTML5, Mac OS, Android, IOS, etc). Since 2004, it has been used to create over 1000 downloadable stories. It has a devoted, international following and is well supported. It is a great platform for learning how to develop interactive content in a digital environment. It is well-suited to beginners and beyond. You do not need to have a technical background to enroll in this course - just a willingness to learn. You will be provided with both the technical training in Ren’Py’s Python-based API, and you will read/study some hypertext and multimodal theory in order to understand how to design ‘branch-based,’ interactive narratives and stories. Ren’Py can be used to create and/or curate a wide range of 'stories' including the following: journalistic/news stories, histories, non-fiction essays, ‘choose your own adventure’ stories, and even interactive user manuals, like an instructable. By the end of the semester, you will have written/published two stories. This course could satisfy the digital technology req in LWR.

Matthew Schmalzer

ENG 395:002 Media Materiality

Media is often characterized as virtual and intangible. However, all media, even the virtual worlds, platforms, and images of digital media, are decidedly physical. The materiality of media has real impacts on lived experiences from how we move through space, to our perceptions of time, to environmental preservation, and even presentations of gender and sexuality. In this class we will consider the multitude of ways media interfaces and hardware come to rhetorically and physically affect users and producers of media through close examinations of embodied relationships to media. We will also dive into issues surrounding the design, production, and labor that goes into creating media technologies. There are hands-on making components to this course, however no prior technical skills are required.

400-level Courses


ENG 416 - ADVANCED NEWS AND ARTICLE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

Paul Christopher Isom

The purpose of the course is to prepare the student for advanced reporting in print/broadcast media. Topics can include in-depth coverage of local, state, and national government; criminal justice and the courts; business and economics; science and health matters; coverage of education, science, religion and sports. This course will seek to enhance both the student’s knowledge of these topics and the student’s ability to successfully report on them.

ENG 417 - EDITORIAL AND OPINION WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 422 - WRITING THEORY AND THE WRITING PROCESS

Zachary Beare

This course is designed to introduce students to the interdisciplinary scholarship that has examined “writing” and the “writing process.” We will consider the roles that writing plays in the formation and maintenance of identity and community, and we will explore the ways that writing functions in our personal, professional, and academic lives. Along the way, we will trouble our definitions of just what counts as “writing,” and we will explore theorizations of related terms like “text,” “discourse,” “composition,” “genre,” and “rhetoric.”  The scholarship we read will showcase varied methods scholars use to study writing in various forms and locales, and as a class, we will discuss the affordances and constraints of these different methodological approaches. Major projects will include an autoethnography in which students examine their own writing practices and/or writing processes, a research report detailing the writing or communication practices of an online community, and a study design and rationale imagining a larger project for investigating writing practices or processes.  Students will not be required to purchase any texts for this class; all readings will be open access or available via Moodle. Students will need regular access to technologies for word processing and internet access for retrieving and submitting course materials and for participating in online synchronous and asynchronous discussions.

ENG 425 - ANALYSIS OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 426 - ANALYZING STYLE (3 CREDITS)

David M Rieder

Introduction to the analysis of style in print-based texts, hypertexts, and visual culture. The semester will be divided among three analytical approaches. First, we begin with Richard Lanham's textbook, Analyzing Prose, which introduces you to the important roles that style plays in prose writing. This first section will offer you a grounding in the rhetorical canon of style. Next, we'll study the changing role of style in the electronic form of hypertext writing. We'll focus our attention on Shelley Jackson's hypertext novel, Patchwork Girl. Finally, we'll look up and off the page/screen to analyze (postmodern) American culture, which is heavily influenced by communicational issues related to style.

In addition to two 6-7 page essays (and other shorter writing assignments), you will learn how to write a hypertextual essay in StorySpace, the same software program that Jackson used to write her hypertext novel.

ENG 448 - AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 452 - MEDIEVAL BRITISH LITERATURE

Jim Knowles

This course is an introduction to literature in Middle English, excluding Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. We will read a selection of major texts contemporary with Chaucer’s literary career, beginning with his other masterpiece, the historical romance of Troilus and Criseyde. From here we will move on to the works of the anonymous Pearl-poet, including the chivalric tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,and the dream-elegy called Pearl. The second half of the course will focus on religious writing in late medieval England, beginning with the allegorical dream-vision of William Langland’s Piers Plowman, then selections from the so-called “Middle English Mystics” (especially Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe), and concluding with the civic spectacle of the York Mystery plays (some of which we will perform in class at the end of term.) No prior knowledge of Middle English is required. Instruction (and practice) in how to read and interpret Middle English poetry and prose will be a major component of the course, but for some of the texts we will enlist the help of facing-page modern translations. For English majors, this course can fulfill the British Lit requirement and/or Pre-1800 requirement. Consult your advisor for specifics. For CHASS majors, fulfills Literature II requirement.

ENG 476 - SOUTHERN LITERACY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 487 - SHAKESPEARE: THE LATER PLAYS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 488 - ADVANCED FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 489 - ADVANCED POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 491 - HONORS IN ENGLISH (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 492 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM STYLES AND GENRES (3 CREDITS)

John Stadler

ENG 492:001 - Queer Cinema

Films that depict homosexuality are no longer a rarity, but what led to their relative mainstream success, and is there a difference between LGBT cinema and queer cinema? This course will examine precisely this question. In the process, we will track the cinematic representation of “queerness,” or, otherness, from the early 20th century to the present moment. We will ask how such depictions have shifted over time from the figure of the invert to the unspoken other, the sissy, villain, deviant, revolutionary, outcast, camp icon, and superstar, etc. Furthermore, we will disentangle the relationship of queer authorship, textuality, reception, and politics. This study into queer cinema will track the representation not just of minority sexualities and genders, but also their intersectional articulations through the categories of race, ethnicity, class, and nation. Course requirements include weekly screenings and readings, regular class participation, blog, group presentation, and two papers.

ENG 494 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS (3 CREDITS)

Robin Dodsworth

Language in Raleigh has been changing. A few decades ago, most people who grew up in Raleigh sounded Southern, and their only native language was English. Then IBM and other research- and technology-focused companies in Research Triangle Park began to attract people to Raleigh from both inside and outside the South, creating a richly heterogeneous dialect contact setting that has (so far) led to the gradual loss of the traditional Southern dialect and the emergence of a new dialect with just a few regionally distinctive features. Yet the loss of the Southern dialect has happened unevenly across Raleigh; as we will see, social class, gender, geography, and ethnicity have all played a role in determining who talks Southern and who doesn’t. At the same time, migration of Spanish speakers to the area has intensified, and one result is that more and more children growing up here natively speak both English and Spanish. In this course, we look closely at the ways in which language has changed in Raleigh and the surrounding region, including phonetic, phonological, lexical, and syntactic features of both English and Spanish. We centrally ask how Raleigh’s economic, cultural, and geographic landscape have both promoted linguistic change and maintained linguistic diversity within the community, and whether Raleigh can be viewed as a typical case of urban dialect contact.

Most of the course will be data-intensive, meaning that we will use a lot of linguistic data and consider various ways of analyzing it to gain a picture of language variation and change. Some of our data will be drawn from the Raleigh corpus, a large set of conversational interviews recorded with Raleigh natives. We will also read about language variation and change in Durham, Chapel Hill, and other North Carolina communities as well as a few other communities in the South.

ENG 495 - LITERATURE AND/AS DATA

Paul Fyfe

We are living in the era of big data. At the same time, big data is shaping how we live, how we define the boundaries of public and private selves, how humans and machines make decisions, and how we are governed and manipulated. In other words, “data” no longer refers to electronic information alone, but to broad reconfigurations of culture. This seminar invites students to explore these changes in contexts of literature, publishing, and literary studies. How does literature represent and respond to a data-saturated world? How might data shape the writing and publishing of literature? And what happens when we approach literature itself as data, subject to measurement, statistical analysis, and visualization? We will read a range of materials from science fiction to journalism to cultural studies. Additionally, with the help of hands-on workshops, we will try some entry-level experiments with data, from text analysis to electronic poems to using AI to “write” literary texts and papers. The course rewards curiosity, and no previous experience or special technical skills are required beyond basic familiarity with a computer.

500-level Courses


ENG 509 - OLD ENGLISH LITERATURE

Erik R. Thomas

This course introduces students to the language and literature of Old English. It begins with an overview of the Old English language, its structure, and its origin so that students can translate writings. Translation of excerpts from Old English literary works begins while the grammatical overview is progressing and continues after the grammatical overview is completed, with discussions and student presentations on motifs in Old English literature. During the latter part of the semester, the class covers a Modern English translation of Beowulf. Students write a course paper on an Old English-related topic of their choosing.

ENG 511 - THEORY AND RESEARCH IN COMPOSITION

Chris Anson

This course provides an introduction to foundational theories and research in the field of composition studies, and is a prerequisite for graduate students who are assigned to teach ENG 101 in the First-Year Writing Program. During the semester, we focus on the dynamic and sometimes competing nature of theories and research, keeping in mind the historical and political contexts in which they emerged. The goal of the course is to examine assumptions underlying current theory and research and to explore implications for the teaching and practice of writing. Conducted as a seminar, the course is designed to help new members of the field to:

  •  familiarize themselves with the range of voices and theoretical assumptions underlying the teaching of writing;
  •  understand various histories of the field of composition studies;
  •  become acquainted with major journals and resources in the field of composition, sufficient for conducting independent explorations of research and theory on topics of interest;
  •  develop a reading knowledge of research methods in composition, sufficient for interpreting and evaluating the results of published research in the field;
  •  apply knowledge of the field’s history, theory, and research in analyzing new contexts, developing new pedagogical insights, and raising new questions for research.

ENG 515 - RHETORIC OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 518 - PUBLICATION MANAGEMENT FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATORS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 519 - ONLINE INFORMATION DESIGN AND EVALUATION (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 522: WRITING IN NONACADEMIC SETTINGS (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 523 - LANGUAGE VARIATION RESEARCH SEMINAR (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 530 - SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE AND ITS GLOBAL NETWORKS (3 CREDITS)

Margaret Simon

This course introduces you to the poets, politicians, historians, and cultural figures of seventeenth-century England. We'll read the work of well-known writers like Ben Jonson and John Donne, but we'll also spend a lot of time encountering authors you've likely never heard of, particularly women writers and non-elite individuals writing for a growing print market. We'll especially consider the production of English literature within a global context. How, for example, can we think of the many English advancements in the seventeenth (more women writers, scientific advancement, travel and exploration, and social legislation), with all of their positive connotations, during a period that saw the brutal establishment of England's settler plantations and the trade in enslaved peoples? How were English scientific advancements, and other intellectual developments, often informed by unacknowledged non-Western scholarship? We'll consider how we can best interpret the signal works of an era and culture that often suppressed the voices of anyone outside of a male English elite. With trips to the library's Special Collections and work with texts in their original print and manuscript forms, we will consider what we can learn about both well-known and marginalized voices through archival research and non-canonical literature. This class will include traditional research papers, as well as a multi-modal final project.

ENG 533 - BILINGUALISM AND LANGUAGE CONTACT (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 536 - RESEARCH METHODS IN PHONOLOGY (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 539 - SEMINAR IN WORLD LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

Elaine Orr

This course will focus on literary narratives (fiction and nonfiction) from a number of global locations to help us understand human rights, justice, and ethics. What does it mean not to have access to education, health care, free speech, reproductive freedom, freedom from violence, for example? Students will have an opportunity to help shape the course by making presentations on the historical and cultural contexts for and critical responses to the books we read.

There isn’t a theoretical framework for the course though we may refer to some contemporary theories in our discussion. If and as we employ them, we’ll define terms for general use. The framework is The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Clapman’s Introduction, the cultural/historical/biographical presentations you make, and the what we define as arising from the texts themselves.

Authors/books include Jenny Erpenbeck, Louise Erdrich, Ken Saro-Wiwa. Jose Saramago, Ta-Nahisi Coates, Refuge Tales, Great Britain: Comma Press, Andrew Clapham, Human Rights: A Very Short Introduction, among others.

ENG 555 - AMERICAN ROMANTICISM (3 CREDITS)

Anne Baker

This course will examine major literary works and movements in the United States from 1820 to 1860. We will focus on the relationship between cultural contexts (Romanticism, nationalism, Westward expansion, Transcendentalism, industrialization, debates over slavery, etc.) and the remarkable formal and stylistic innovation that characterized this period in American literary history. Authors will include Melville, Hawthorne, Douglass, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, and Whitman. We will meet in-person on Monday evenings and online on Wednesday evenings. 

ENG 562 - 18TH-CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE (3 CREDITS)

John Morillo

We will approach the rich field of eighteenth-century texts from the literary-historical perspective of genre, by studying a variety of literary forms in poetry and prose in Britain from 1660 to 1790. These include satire in verse and prose; letters in verse and prose; odes; elegies and epitaphs; sermons and devotional writing; and weird works with no definite or agreed upon genre. Eighteenth-century writers were constantly reevaluating what should count as literature, so will explore the way forms for writing poetry and prose allowed authors to innovate carefully while remaining anchored in tradition; how men and women writers handled the same genres; which genres were popular and why, and why some have survived better than others. Throughout the readings we will learn the importance of the rhetorical principle of decorum, of choosing a fit style for different subjects and audiences. Though we will not include the novel or drama, we will consider other kinds of shorter prose  fiction and nonfiction. We will study the works of writers from a century of great intellectual range from which we have inherited some abiding interests. You will work with older and recent criticism of genres and texts and pursue independent research.

ENG 564 - VICTORIAN NOVEL (3 CREDITS)

Leila May

This seminar is designed to introduce you to the study of the Victorian novel at the graduate level through reading novels by such authors as the Brontë sisters, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, M.E. Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Thomas Hardy, and Bram Stoker. One of the principal areas of focus will be on what was commonly termed "The Woman Question"—something that was, in fact, a series of probes, reactions and heated debates concerning the status of women that transfixed the era. We will look not only at the figure of the Victorian Angel in the House but, in particular, at various "odd" and "other" women, those who go beyond the straightforward models set out for them by the social, legal, medical and domestic ideologies of their day.

ENG 581 - VISUAL RHETORIC: THEORY AND CRITICISM (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 582 - Studies in Literature: Race, Gender, and Transnationalism in American Literature

Rebecca Walsh

This course responds in part to the urgency of current anti-racist protest movements by taking as its focus constructions of race and gender in post-1900 American literature in the context of nation/transnationalism. We will attend to some of the foundational concepts in critical race theory (with roots in legal scholarship), and current directions in discussions of race, gender, comparative ethnic studies, and nation/transnation. We will consider these concepts in relation to the literature on tap, and explore the potential for the literature of the course to extend our understanding of systems of race, gender, nation, and power, and the intersectional nature of identity. Readings will include critical race theory, theories of intersectionality, feminist locational theory, and theories of nation and transnationalism. Literature under consideration will include work by some of the following: Charles Chesnutt, Sarah Orne Jewett, Edith Maude Eaton (Sui Sin Far), Langston Hughes, W.E.B. DuBois, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Audre Lorde, June Jordan, Jamaica Kincaid, Percival Everett, Karen Tei Yamashita, Claudia Rankine.

ENG 583 - Special Topics: Cultural Rhetorics

Ronisha Browdy

This course is about interrogating the relationship between rhetoric and culture within rhetorical and composition studies. The objectives of this course includes: 1) to offer an overview of cultural rhetorics as a subfield and methodological practice (i.e., what is it and how can we use it?); 2) engage the rhetorical legacies, literacies, and meaning-making practices of under-represented cultural communities; and 3) provide space and opportunities for students to critically-engage the cultural relevance of rhetorical sites of interest and inquiry of their own choosing. Cultural rhetorics topics that may be engaged in this course include: African/African American rhetorics, Latinx rhetorics, queer rhetorics, embodied rhetorics, feminist rhetorics, hip-hop rhetorics, and the cultural rhetorical perspectives of interest to students.

ENG 585 - STUDIES IN FILM (3 CREDITS)

Andrew Johnston

Media and Machine Aesthetics

This seminar will explore ways of studying aesthetic and social relations that emerge through technical media and objects. Questions of perception, sensation, and political affect have long been central concerns of critics and practitioners for various art practices, but how do contemporary media landscapes and cultures affect these areas of inquiry? How do technical and aesthetic forms move across media boundaries and shape contemporary cultures through networked practices? To answer these questions this seminar will focus on the relationships created through various encounters with media and machines—such as films, self-propelled art objects, optical toys, rendering engines, video games, gifs, AI—and artists and movements—like constructivism, Buster Keaton, Carolee Schneemann, Bridget Riley, glitch, Takeshi Murata—in order to foreground ways of studying the saturation of media within contemporary experience. Not leaving history behind, the class will show how current media practices build from or incorporate past modes of engagement, such as nineteenth century ideas of the operational aesthetic, and also work through how to triangulate approaches to aesthetic theory with phenomenology, affect theory, feminism, materialism, and critical race theory. By working comparatively, we will examine the seemingly ordinary formal and material media practices that shape not just technical structures of communication but also perception and feeling.

ENG 588 - FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

Belle Boggs

Advanced work in techniques of writing fiction for students in the MFA program. Workshop sessions with students commenting on each other's work as well as close reading of novels and short stories.

ENG 589 - POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (3 CREDITS)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 590 - STUDIES IN CREATIVE WRITING (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 592 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM STYLES AND GENRES

John Stadler

ENG 592:001 - Queer Cinema

Only open to MA film concentration students.

Films that depict homosexuality are no longer a rarity, but what led to their relative mainstream success, and is there a difference between LGBT cinema and queer cinema? This course will examine precisely this question. In the process, we will track the cinematic representation of “queerness,” or, otherness, from the early 20th century to the present moment. We will ask how such depictions have shifted over time from the figure of the invert to the unspoken other, the sissy, villain, deviant, revolutionary, outcast, camp icon, and superstar, etc. Furthermore, we will disentangle the relationship of queer authorship, textuality, reception, and politics. This study into queer cinema will track the representation not just of minority sexualities and genders, but also their intersectional articulations through the categories of race, ethnicity, class, and nation. Course requirements include weekly screenings and readings, regular class participation, blog, group presentation, and two papers.

600-level Courses


ENG 636 - DIRECTED READINGS

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ENG 675 - PROJECTS IN TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3 CREDITS)

Huiling Ding

Students working on a capstone project will be guided through a review of research and design methodologies, data gathering and analysis, and processes of drafting and reviewing research- and design-based projects. It runs as student-centered seminars, with discussion focusing on the progress and problems of researching, designing, developing, and defending a larger project, and on helping each other work within established deadlines and different fields. A typical capstone project is expected to provide students with an opportunity to gain deeper insight into the field and to acquire greater ability to work in the profession of technical communication.

ENG 676 - MASTER'S PROJECT IN ENGLISH (3 CREDITS)

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ENG 685 - MASTER'S SUPERVISED TEACHING

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ENG 695 - MASTER'S THESIS RESEARCH

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - SPECIAL TOPICS IN ENGLISH STUDIES

Ronisha Browdy

ENG 798:001 Cultural Rhetorics

This course is about interrogating the relationship between rhetoric and culture within rhetorical and composition studies. The objectives of this course includes: 1) to offer an overview of cultural rhetorics as a subfield and methodological practice (i.e., what is it and how can we use it?); 2) engage the rhetorical legacies, literacies, and meaning-making practices of under-represented cultural communities; and 3) provide space and opportunities for students to critically-engage the cultural relevance of rhetorical sites of interest and inquiry of their own choosing. Cultural rhetorics topics that may be engaged in this course include: African/African American rhetorics, Latinx rhetorics, queer rhetorics, embodied rhetorics, feminist rhetorics, hip-hop rhetorics, and the cultural rhetorical perspectives of interest to students.

Andrew Johnston

ENG 798:005 Media and Machine Aesthetics

This seminar will explore ways of studying aesthetic and social relations that emerge through technical media and objects. Questions of perception, sensation, and political affect have long been central concerns of critics and practitioners for various art practices, but how do contemporary media landscapes and cultures affect these areas of inquiry? How do technical and aesthetic forms move across media boundaries and shape contemporary cultures through networked practices? To answer these questions this seminar will focus on the relationships created through various encounters with media and machines—such as films, self-propelled art objects, optical toys, rendering engines, video games, gifs, AI—and artists and movements—like constructivism, Buster Keaton, Carolee Schneemann, Bridget Riley, glitch, Takeshi Murata—in order to foreground ways of studying the saturation of media within contemporary experience. Not leaving history behind, the class will show how current media practices build from or incorporate past modes of engagement, such as nineteenth century ideas of the operational aesthetic, and also work through how to triangulate approaches to aesthetic theory with phenomenology, affect theory, feminism, materialism, and critical race theory. By working comparatively, we will examine the seemingly ordinary formal and material media practices that shape not just technical structures of communication but also perception and feeling.

800-level Courses


ENG 810 - DIRECTED READINGS IN ENGLISH STUDIES

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HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 -  DISCOVERING LITERATURE: UTOPIAS AND DYSTOPIAS

John Morillo

Thomas More literally wrote the book on utopia in 1516, and in 1868 John Stuart Mill coined ‘dystopia’ as the antithesis of More's beautiful nowhere-land.  These authors together represent just two of the many contributions of literature, the arts, political science, and philosophy to our current range of possibilities about what might make the world an ideal place, or an utterly horrible one. How have ideas of the good life changed? Where might it be found, or how created? Is a straight, non-satiric utopian vision still possible? Why are some works classified as both utopian and dystopian? This course will explore some dimensions of utopian and dystopian thinking, including treatments of the topic in art, film, and new online media --the last notable example of a portal to either an utopian or dystopian future, depending on whom you ask! Readings will range from the classical period to the present, and can include: Plato’s Republic, Moore’s Utopia, Thoreau’s Walden, Marx’s Communist Manifesto, Orwell’s 1984, and Dick’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, paired with Ridley Scott’s movie treatment of it, Blade Runner.  We will also compare male and female visions of the ideal and horrific via works from the 17th and 20th centuries by Margaret Cavendish and Charlotte Gillman.

400-level Courses


HON 491H - POPULAR MAGAZINES & LITERATURE IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICA

Jennifer Nolan

While often overlooked today, popular magazines played a fundamental role in the publication, circulation, reception, and interpretation of twentieth-century American literature. Advances in printing technologies brought these magazines into the homes of millions, where poetry, short stories, illustrations, photographs, investigative journalism, advertising, and criticism intermingled in one of the primary vehicles for mass culture through mid-century. This course will explore several elements of this relationship including

  •  The influence of publishing in popular magazines on the careers and reputations of authors such as F. Scott Fitzgerald, who was virtually employed by the Saturday Evening Post (the Netflix of his era) at the height of his career, and Shirley Jackson, whose work often challenged generic boundaries, as is evidenced by the breath of magazines in which she published.
  •  W.E.B. Du Bois and Jessie Faucet’s editorial styles at The Crisis and the magazine’s role in challenging racial inequality and promoting Harlem Renaissance artists, such as Langston Hughes.
  •  The rise of Black Mask, Dashiell Hammett, and detective fiction.

Throughout, we will also consider how each writer uses these spaces to comment upon, represent, challenge, and critique prevailing social issues of their day. Students will be introduced to current methods and tools facilitating scholarly research in the rapidly expanding field of periodical studies, including the Modernist Journals Project, and will conduct their own research into a topic in this field.