Fall 2018 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

200-level Courses


ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

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ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

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ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

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ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 222 - Literature of the Western World II (3 credits)

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ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

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ENG 246 - Literature of the Holocaust (3 credits)

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ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 260 - Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality (3 credits)

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ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

American culture has always been shaped by voices not fully embraced by the mainstream, whether those voices come from an environment defined by racial or ethnic difference, gender difference, class difference or differences having to do with sexual orientation. This course will explore the nexus between American literature and its rich traditions of diversity. For our purposes we will focus on diversity in literature as exemplified by women writers (Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Willa Cather, Elizabeth Bishop and Gertrude Stein) African-American writers (W.E.B. Dubois, Yusef Komunyakaa, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin Gwendolyn Brooks, James Wright, Langston Hughes, Tony Morrison and August Wilson) Native American writers (Zitkala-Sa, Simon Ortiz), writers who address class (William Faulkner and Cormac McCarthy), writers who make sexual orientation central to their work (Frank O’Hara, Annie Proulx, Allen Ginsberg) and Jewish writers (Allen Ginsberg, George Oppen, Art Spiegelman). Key issues: freedom (individual as well as collective), the struggle for democracy, equality and inequality, and identity—what it means to be American.

The course will explore literature in the period following the Civil War up to the present moment as evaluating important social and cultural conflicts in the American experience, but equally, it will examine the ways in which American writers have used a sense of difference—a different sense of language, different traditions of oratory and address, different idioms, different literary traditions and ultimately, different ways of seeing--to transform American literature and to extend our sense of what it can do.

 

Rebecca Ann Walsh

This course focuses on American literature from the Civil War to the present, with particular attention to the construction of, and contests around, race, class, gender, sexuality, and aspects of national identity. Surveying this field in a comprehensive way in one semester is an impossible task, of course, given the rich range of literatures written in the United States in the last century and a half. So this course makes this difficulty its subject matter by interrogating the contested ways that ideas of “American-ness” or categories of “American” have been constructed by various writers working and living in the United States. In particular, we will focus on several dominant, and sometimes paradoxical, ways of understanding what makes American literature distinctly “American.” American literature seems to reproduce an American culture that has a particular identity distinct from other global cultures. But, at the same time, the purportedly democratic nature of our culture means that American literature produces multiple, heterogeneous cultures that tug at the notion of an identifiable shared, singular “Americanness.” Our time during the semester will focus on the literary movements of late Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism with these challenges in mind, with attention to the role that race, class, gender, and national identity play.

ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

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ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

Devin A. Orgeron PhD

Comprehensive study of various approaches to writing about film. Primary focus is on the critical and evaluative practice involved in writing film criticism for non-academic audiences. Film screenings, discussion of assigned readings, and in-class writing workshops aid students in preparing a portfolio of film writing that includes film reviews of various lengths.

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

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300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 316 - Introduction to News and Article Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 317 - Designing Web Communication (3 credits)

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ENG 321 - Survey of Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

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ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

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ENG 324 - Modern English Syntax (3 credits)

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ENG 328 - Language and Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

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ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 342 - Literature of Space and Place (3 credits)

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ENG 362 - Studies in the British Novel (3 credits)

Leila S May

In this course we will explore the nineteenth-century British novel from a variety of interrelated vantage points. We will examine the conditions of production--the historical and cultural contexts--which generate these works and which they in turn participate in generating. Of particular concern will be the ways in which representations of gender, sexuality, work, class relations, and the family function in these texts, as well as the effect of narrative form and technique on these representations. The literary genres on which we will most closely focus this semester will include gothic, sensation, and fin-de-siecle ("end of the century") fiction. Novelists will include Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, M. E. Braddon, and Bram Stoker. Grades will be based on informal writings, two papers (or a paper and a project), a group presentation, weekly contributions to an online discussion forum, quizzes, a midterm and a final exam.

ENG 364 - History of Film to 1940 (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

Film History to 1940

This course begins with the international origins of motion pictures and traces the medium's fascinating evolution from experimental novelty to economic big business. We will study the development of form, style, narrative, and industry practices through several national cinemas, including French, German, Italian, British, Soviet, and American. Along with an understanding of major and minor cinematic movements, this course seeks to give students a sense of the cultural and historical context of cinematic production. We will screen narrative and experimental film, as well as nontheatrical film (such as home movies and educational film). The course includes readings and screenings, a creative video assignment, weekly quizzes, a series of examinations, and written assignments.

ENG 376 - Science Fiction (3 credits)

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ENG 378 - Women & Film (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

This course introduces students to the analysis of gender in film and media history, theory, and criticism. The course teaches students to look at the ways film and other audiovisual media has (and has not been) by, for, and about women–on and offscreen. Accordingly, the course looks at a range of issues, including: debates about the male vs the female gaze in the cinema; the cinematic techniques and strategies by which gender is constructed onscreen; the depiction of sexuality and sexual violence in film; film form and genre; national vs. transnational cinema; spectatorship; race; and class. The course is structured as a seminar, with an emphasis on developing students' ability to analyze films/visual media and critical readings and develop and articulate arguments. Filmmakers, television shows, and authors to be considered include Lena Dunham (of HBO's Girls), Alfred Hitchcock (Rebecca and Shadow of a Doubt), Vera Chytilová (Daisies), Niels Oplev/David Fincher (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo), Thomas Vinterberg (The Celebration) Cristian Mungiu (Graduation), Catherine Breillat, Lina Wertmüller (Seven Beauties), Paul Verhoeven (Black Book and Elle), Park Chan-wook (The Handmaiden), Agnès Varda (Faces Places), Kendrick Lamar, and Beyoncé (Lemonade), among others.

ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

Crime and Punishment: Criminality in 20th - 21st century Film and Literature

This course examines the figure of the criminal as well as the concepts of criminality, justice, and punishment in 20th - 21st century film and literature. Topics to be explored include the following: why has crime been such a compelling subject for filmmakers since the invention of the medium? What are the conventions and limits of the genre? How have various national cinemas and works of literature depicted crime in ways that comment on and reflect particular historical moments and contexts (e.g., "crimes against humanity" committed during wartime)? How do films and works of literature about criminals and criminality represent distinctions not only between male and female positions of control and aggression, but also between the differences in male and female experiences of, or responses to violent crime, either as victims or as witnesses? This course will also use the detective story (films and literary works that explore the process of solving crimes) to introduce theories of analyzing films and works of literature. In other words, just as there are methods that investigators follow in reconstructing a crime, or the scene of a crime, film and literary analysis itself involves certain modes of identifying, collecting, analyzing, and interpreting evidence. Students should be aware that some of the films and literary works included in the course contain graphic, potentially disturbing depictions of violence. The course includes works by Luchino Visconti (Obsession); François Truffaut (The 400 Blows); Martin Scorsese (Goodfellas); Fritz Lang (M); Stanley Kubrick (The Killing); Alfred Hitchcock (The Shadow of A Doubt and Vertigo), Thomas Narcejac and Pierre Boileau (The Living and the Dead); Orson Welles (The Lady From Shanghai); Lina Wertmüller (Seven Beauties); Jessica Blank and Eric Jensen (The Exonerated: A Play); Josh and Ben Safdie (Good Time); Hannah Arendt (Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil); Paul Verhoeven (Elle), David Cronenberg (A History of Violence) Jonathan Glazer, and Joel and Ethan Cohen, among others.

Crime and Punishment: Criminality in 20th - 21st century Film and Literature
This course examines the figure of the criminal as well as the concepts of criminality, justice, and punishment in 20th - 21st century film and literature. Topics to be explored include the following: why has crime been such  a  compelling  subject  for  filmmakers since  the  invention  of  the  medium?  What  are  the conventions and limits of the genre? How have various national cinemas and works of literature depicted crime in ways that comment on and reflect particular historical moments and contexts (e.g., "crimes against humanity" committed during wartime)? How do films and works of literature about criminals and criminality represent distinctions not only between male and female positions of control and aggression, but also between the differences in male and female experiences of, or responses to violent crime, either as victims or as witnesses? This course will also use the detective story (films and literary works that explore the process of solving crimes) to introduce theories of analyzing films and works of literature. In other words, just as there are methods that investigators follow in reconstructing a crime, or the scene of a crime, film and literary analysis itself involves certain modes of identifying, collecting, analyzing, and interpreting evidence. Students should be aware that some of the films and literary works included in the course contain graphic, potentially disturbing depictions of violence. The course includes works by Luchino Visconti (Obsession); François Truffaut (The 400 Blows);  Martin Scorsese (Goodfellas); Fritz Lang (M); Stanley Kubrick (The Killing); Alfred Hitchcock (The Shadow of A Doubt and Vertigo), Thomas Narcejac and Pierre Boileau (The Living and the Dead); Orson Welles (The Lady From Shanghai);  Lina Wertmüller (Seven Beauties);  Jessica Blank and Eric Jensen (The Exonerated: A Play); Josh and Ben Safdie (Good Time); Hannah Arendt (Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil); Paul Verhoeven (Elle), David Cronenberg (A History of Violence) Jonathan Glazer, and Joel and Ethan Cohen, among others.

ENG 385 - Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 393 - Studies in Literary Genre (3 credits)

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ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

The human imagination has been obsessed with disaster since it could first imagine it—one only has to think of BEOWULF and the INFERNO for two famous literary examples of “the imagination of disaster”. Because disaster is not localized to one or two individuals and tends to be widespread, disaster itself is spectacular and inherently dramatic. Individuals have, of course, always had trials and tribulations, but disaster speaks to something larger—a cataclysm that befalls society in general. This course will examine a variety of texts—essays, poems, short stories and novels—that focus on catastrophe. In HEART OF DARKNESS, Conrad sees colonialism itself in the late nineteenth-century as a massive killing machine, but one that enriches the mother country of Belgium. In “The Waste Land” T.S. Eliot envisions Western civilization broken by WWI and the rise of an empty commercialism. Some like Miguel Hernandez’s PRISON POEMS critique the fascism that terrorized Europe in the run-up to WWII by refusing its narrow terms; others, like Elie Wiesel’s NIGHT seek to give a sense of the nightmare that was Nazism as it brutalized and killed entire populations. Peter Riley’s collection of poems, MAP OF FARING, seeks to come to grips with the after effects of totalitarianism in our own time. Franz Kafka and Claudia Rankine analyze our fatal attraction to punishment and racism respectively as defects that disfigure society itself. Ali Smith’s AUTUMN explores ecological catastrophe while Mohsin Hamid’s novel EXIT WEST examines the convulsive force of immigration as it destabilizes established borders and conventions. Lastly Miyuki Miyube’s CROSSFIRE is a speculative novel that analyzes the force of social discontent itself. Key questions: What techniques does the literature of disaster employ? What is its value? What are the dramatic advantages and limitations of generalizing disaster in literature? No previous knowledge of the subject is assumed. Formal requirements: two out-of-class essays and a midterm and a final.

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

Erin Lynne O'Quinn

What does a Google Drive folder share in common with the Library of Congress’ Digital
Collection or a website that stores oral histories of Latin American migrants in North Carolina? Answer: all three examples digitally archive material for a specific purpose. However, in the age of storing everything from personal to public records via new media technologies, how do we ultimately define the “digital archive”? What are ways in which we can rhetorically analyze its affordances and limitations to become both critical users (and producers) of Archive 4.0?

Our class will examine the ways in which digital archives are constructed and produced for public audiences, particularly public history and sites of cultural heritage. Topics will involve exploring the rhetorical properties of select archives, including archival selection and exigence, narrative, collaboration and constitution. We will also explore the impact of digital storage upon individual and cultural memory. In addition to analyzing select archives, we will gain applied knowledge and experience throughout the semester. You will learn how to use the open source web-publishing platform, Omeka, to create your own digital archive projects, working to practically develop your own archival literacy while better understanding digital archives as 'dynamic site[s] of rhetorical power' (Morris, 'The Archival Turn in Rhetorical Studies,' p. 115).

ENG 399 - Contemporary Literature (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

This course will read and study great novels of the world written in the past 25 years.

400-level Courses


ENG 400 - Applied Criticism (3 credits)

W J Miller

Types and methods of literary criticism designed specifically for students intending to teach English in high school.

ENG 411 - Rhetorical Criticism (3 credits)

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ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 422 - Writing Theory and the Writing Process (3 credits)

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ENG 449 - 16th-Century English Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 455 - Literacy in the U.S. (3 credits)

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ENG 470 - American Literature, Twentieth Century and Beyond (3 credits)

James M. Grimwood

Literature of the United States between the Age of Edison and the Age of iPod—from America’s acquisition of a colonial empire, through three world wars and an economic depression, to the temporary global triumph (and tragedy?) of U.S. consumer capitalism. Large themes: reactions against Victorianism; germination and multiple fruition of Modernism; various adaptations, rejections, and transformations of Modernism. Writing assignments emphasize placement of short stories in contemporary cultural contexts. Cast of thousands includes Cather, Stein, Eliot, Frost, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Wright, Hurston, Welty, O’Connor, Kerouac, Baldwin, Ginsberg, Lowell, Pynchon, Barth, Le Guin, Carver, McCarthy, De Lillo, etc. Average velocity of course (21.5 minutes per year) not uniformly maintained. A shorter research paper and a longer research paper, a midterm exam and a final exam.

ENG 483 - Literature and Media (3 credits)

Jennifer Anne Nolan

This course will focus on print media of the first half of the twentieth century, including magazines, books, and newspapers, and the way they shaped, circulated, and complicated the works of three major literary figures: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Virginia Woolf, and William Faulkner. Topics we will explore include the influence of periodicals on Fitzgerald’s reputation and short story career, modernism in the magazines, Woolf and the literary marketplace, and Faulkner and popular genre fiction. Students will be introduced to current methods and tools facilitating scholarly research on Modernism and print culture and will conduct their own research into a topic related to this field.

ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 490 - Studies in Medieval Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

Anne Baker

This course will examine writing about the natural environment from the nineteenth century to the present.  We will consider how changing cultural values have shaped competing definitions of nature and how writers have stretched generic boundaries in order to convey the relationship between human and the natural world in nuanced ways.  Related issues to be addressed include: the pastoral ideal, Romantic and Transcendentalist views of nature, the tension between scientific and religious understandings of the natural world, the rise of the conservation movement, gendered views of nature, and the relationship between nature writing and environmental activism.  We will also look at landscape painting and photography in order to explore the similarities and dissimilarities between visual and verbal representations of nature.  Authors may include: Henry David Thoreau, Willa Cather, Edward Abbey, Wendell Berry, Mary Oliver, and Margaret Atwood, among others.

ENG 492 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Devin A. Orgeron PhD

Science Fiction Film and Media (ENG 492/IDS 496)

One of the cinema’s most enduring and popular genres, Science Fiction might also be the most curious. Along with the social, political, technological, and scientific concerns of the films we’ll view in class, we will consider the cinema’s particular fascination with and ability to imagine “the future.” Focused on international films from the 1950s- present, requirements include weekly readings, two term papers, and a cumulative final.

I don't try to describe the future. I try to prevent it. –Ray Bradbury

500-level Courses


ENG 508 - Usability Studies for Technical Communication (3 credits)

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ENG 510 - Middle English Literature (3 credits)

James Robert Knowles

Mystics, Prophets, and Dreamers. This course explores the fascinating range of visionary literature, both religious and secular, that emerged in the late middle ages in Europe, with particular focus on England in the late fourteenth century. Writers and texts may include Bonaventure's Journey of the Mind to God, Chaucer's dream visions, Langland's Piers Plowman, the Cloud of Unknowing, Julian of Norwich's Revelations of Divine Love, the Book of Margery Kempe, and Pearl, among others. Most texts in Middle English will be read in the original language. No prior knowledge of Middle English is required. Requirements include weekly blogging assignments, a presentation on a critical article, a substantial research paper, and active, dedicated participation in the seminar.

ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

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ENG 512 - Theory and Research In Professional Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 515 - Rhetoric Of Science and Technology (3 credits)

Stacey L Pigg

ENG 515 introduces rhetorical theory and analysis as lenses for understanding how scientific and technical language and artifacts are invented, circulated, and transformed. Rhetorical theory and analysis are useful for understanding and producing technical and scientific communication directed to expert audiences, such as what you might encounter in journal articles or patents. However, it is also useful for understanding how scientific and technical discourse reaches and engages (or fails to engage) publics. The course will examine and apply vocabulary, analytical processes, and conventions of argument from rhetorical theory to scientific and technological issues and workplaces. The goal of learning about these rhetorical theories and practices is to provide frameworks for making purposeful decisions for how to take action with science and technology in public, professional, and personal life.

ENG 517 - Advanced Technical Writing, Editing and Document Design (3 credits)

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ENG 520 - Science Writing for the Media (3 credits)

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ENG 525 - Variety In Language (3 credits)

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ENG 527 - Discourse Analysis (3 credits)

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ENG 528 - Sociophonetics (3 credits)

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ENG 539 - Seminar In World Literature (3 credits)

Miriam E Orr

Seminar in World Literature: Achebe and Adichie

In this seminar, we will read major works by two of Nigeria’s best known writers, Chinua Achebe, the father of African literature, and the New York Times best-seller, Chimamanda Adichie, who grew up in Achebe’s shadow in her home town of Nsukka, also home to the University of Nigeria. She began writing at an early age but it wasn’t until she read Achebe that she realized her characters could look and act as she did. Since Achebe began publishing in the 1950s, Nigeria has been a powerhouse for published African literature: fiction, poetry, and drama. The links and divergences between Achebe and Adichie provide a window for studying the development of Nigerian as well as African literature in the period from 1957 (when Things Fall Apart was first published) to the present. Achebe’s writing focuses on Nigerian lives in the country of Nigeria while Adichie’s writing is often trans-Atlantic, her characters taking up residence in both the U.S. and Nigeria. We will read all of Adichie’s major works (Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, The Thing Around Your Neck, Americana) while we will likely read Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, No Longer at Ease, Anthills of the Savannah, and Home and Exile. We will read some of Achebe’s critical work in postcolonialism as well as Adichie’s essay, “We Should All Be Feminists.” In addition to reading Achebe and Adichie, students will be asked to explore another Nigerian writer of the period. In addition, we will examine the material realities of publishing in Nigeria and necessarily delve into Nigeria’s postcolonial history. While the primary objective of the class is gaining a deep acquaintance with these two writers whose cumulative work spans the past sixty years, another over-arching issue is this: How does Nigerian literature critique and expand our understanding of the postmodern era?

ENG 558 - Studies In Shakespeare (3 credits)

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ENG 581 - Visual Rhetoric: Theory and Criticism (3 credits)

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ENG 582 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

John D Morillo

Animal Studies: from 1660 to 1930 in Britain

This Studies in Literature special topics course will use the interdisciplinary lens of animal studies, work on the relationship between humans and other animal species, to explore the contribution of important texts in British literature between the 17th and 20th centuries to this growing area of academic interest. Students will read literary works that engage with animals and help us define our humanity, but also further representations of animal issues within natural philosophy/science and theology. Literary genres will include prose and poetry. Authors and types of texts will include works from the Restoration, 18th-Century, Romantic, Victorian and Modern periods. For example, from the Restoration, Margaret Cavendish’s brilliantly weird Blazing World (science fiction and natural philosophy); from the 18th century, Alexander Pope’s Guardian essay’s forecast of animal rights (prose), Jonathan Swift’s iconic human: animal encounters in Gulliver’s Travels (fiction), William Cowper’s lyric verses about his pets (poetry), and Humphrey Primatt’s impassioned stance against animal cruelty in Duty of Mercy and Sin of Cruelty to Brute Animals (theology). From the Romantic period, Erasmus Darwin’s monumental exposition of evolution as the Great Secret of Life in The Temple of Nature (poetry, prose), Dorothy Kilner’s Life and Perambulations of a Mouse (children’s literature), and Samuel Coleridge’s famous albatross (poetry). From the Victorian period Charles Darwin’s revolutionary Origin of Species (zoology), Rudyard Kipling’s Indian animals as issues of empire in Jungle Book (children’s literature). And from the early 20th-century John Collier’s inimitable social satire in His Monkey Wife, or Married to a Chimp. These historical readings will be supplemented with select current criticism in animal studies.

 

W J Miller

Langston Hughes: From Popular Culture to the Civil Rights Movement

Langston Hughes both lived through and shaped the late Civil Rights Movement in America. As such, this seminar is designed to first understand and then explore his impact beyond the Harlem Renaissance.

Using primary sources, as well as works from Hughes’s seventeen-volume oeuvre, this course examines Hughes’s use of popular blues and jazz music to shape the rhythms and cadence of his poetry. Despite (or perhaps because of?) their blues influence, many of Hughes’s poems read like rehearsals for social change.

We will then continue on through his dramatic works, track his influence on Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun, and move into his weekly newspaper columns in the Chicago Defender from 1942-65. Of special note, this seminar begins and ends with extended exploration into the previously unidentified role Hughes’s poetry played in the Civil Rights Movement as a key influence on Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Rebecca Ann Walsh

Theoretical Perspectives on American Literature: This course examines a range of American literary and filmic texts of the twentieth-century and beyond through recent theoretical and methodological developments important to the fields of literary and cultural studies. Theories/methods will likely include feminist and queer theory, critical race theory, transnationalism/postcoloniality, spatial theory, new materialisms, and ecocriticism/the anthropocene. The reading list of literary texts will likely include the following: imagist poetry by H.D. and Amy Lowell; fiction by W.E.B. Du Bois (the newly discovered story "The Princess Steel" and possibly his novel Dark Princess); Djuna Barnes’ Nightwood (which T.S. Eliot raved about); assorted poetry and journalism by Langston Hughes; African American fiction of expatriation (Claude McKay, Jessie Redmon Fauset, and/or William Gardner Smith); contemporary multicultural/anti-empire poetry; and contemporary climate fiction. We will also examine the 1930 film Borderline, possibly one or two others time permitting.

ENG 585 - Studies In Film (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

Laboring Ladies: How Pre-1960s Hollywood Imagined Working Women

American women have been hard at work in the movies since the medium’s earliest years, from undercover spies and nurses in the teens, to department store clerks and secretaries in the 1920s, journalists and showgirls in the 1930s, restaurant entrepreneurs and factory workers in the 1940s, and advertising executives and fashion designers in the 1950s. Whether in comedies, dramas, romances, or crime films, laboring ladies on the silver screen have a lot to teach us about the history of women’s participation in the workplace and in the home as it was imagined by an industry that was deeply engaged with how women navigated the world.

This class will focus on a selective history of working women in movies made before the 1960s. Although we will use films as the spine of the course, we will also read primary materials, especially contemporary women’s fiction, reviews and commentary in women’s magazines, and writing by experts ranging from psychologists to suffragists. We will consider some films whose source material derived from women’s writing, as well as films by female directors. Secondary sources will help guide us through the historical contexts in which these films were produced as we encounter recurrent themes such as women’s inability to balance careers with marriage or the skills needed to fend off powerful male sexual predators.

Students will be expected to write a series of short reflection and archival research papers, participate regularly in class discussions, and produce a final project that is suited to their disciplinary and scholarly interests. This final project can range from a traditional academic research paper, to a work of fiction, to a video essay, to a multi-media installation, to a web-based project (the nature of the project will be decided between each student and the professor). At the final exam each student will present their final projects to the class in the form of an abbreviated reading/performance, conference-style paper, or screening, depending upon the nature of the final project.

ENG 587 - Interdisciplinary Studies in English (3 credits)

Andrew Robert Johnston

Methods and Theories in Media Studies

This seminar will explore key theoretical and methodological issues in media studies. We will discuss approaches, paradigms, as well as discourses about media landscapes and objects in order to prepare students to engage in various forms of research. Topics will include historiography, media archaeology, ethnographic approaches to media, cultural hierarchy and taste, formalism and aesthetics, feminist theory, and analyses of political economy and media institutions. We will engage with a variety of media, from broadcast television and cinema to mobile technologies and social networks.

ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 592 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (1-6 credits)

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600-level Courses


ENG 624 - Teaching College Composition (3 credits)

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ENG 669 - Bibliography and Methodology (3 credits)

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ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

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ENG 685 - Master's Supervised Teaching (3 credits)

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

Laboring Ladies: How Pre-1960s Hollywood Imagined Working Women

American women have been hard at work in the movies since the medium’s earliest years, from undercover spies and nurses in the teens, to department store clerks and secretaries in the 1920s, journalists and showgirls in the 1930s, restaurant entrepreneurs and factory workers in the 1940s, and advertising executives and fashion designers in the 1950s. Whether in comedies, dramas, romances, or crime films, laboring ladies on the silver screen have a lot to teach us about the history of women’s participation in the workplace and in the home as it was imagined by an industry that was deeply engaged with how women navigated the world.

This class will focus on a selective history of working women in movies made before the 1960s. Although we will use films as the spine of the course, we will also read primary materials, especially contemporary women’s fiction, reviews and commentary in women’s magazines, and writing by experts ranging from psychologists to suffragists. We will consider some films whose source material derived from women’s writing, as well as films by female directors. Secondary sources will help guide us through the historical contexts in which these films were produced as we encounter recurrent themes such as women’s inability to balance careers with marriage or the skills needed to fend off powerful male sexual predators.

Students will be expected to write a series of short reflection and archival research papers, participate regularly in class discussions, and produce a final project that is suited to their disciplinary and scholarly interests. This final project can range from a traditional academic research paper, to a work of fiction, to a video essay, to a multi-media installation, to a web-based project (the nature of the project will be decided between each student and the professor). At the final exam each student will present their final projects to the class in the form of an abbreviated reading/performance, conference-style paper, or screening, depending upon the nature of the final project.

CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 701 - ( credits)

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CRD 702 - Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

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CRD 704 - ( credits)

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CRD 791 - ( credits)

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800-level Courses


CRD 809 - Colloquium in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media (1 credit)

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CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

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CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

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CRD 895 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9 credits)

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HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

Leila S May

What does it mean to label someone monstrous or mad? All cultures have some means of identifying those who transgress accepted boundaries and standards of established behavior.  Looking at the ways in which these loosely related concepts are rendered in a given historical moment is a useful way of assessing the most strongly defended values of a particular culture and era.  This course will examine how these categories of exclusion have been represented across a broad spectrum of British and American literary, anthropological, medical, sociological, and cinematic works of the last two centuries. In the process, students will develop their critical and interpretive skills as readers, and their analytical and rhetorical strategies as writers.

Catherine Mary Mainland

HON 202: The Art of War

Whether nations win or lose, war has always left its mark on the arts. This course will take a comparative look at artistic responses to the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and modern military campaigns. Through our examination of the history and social psychology of war, we will pay constant attention to the infinitely human urge to use art to deal with the inhumane, comedy to combat tragedy, and story-telling to work through feelings of guilt, loss, inadequacy, or doubt. With readings of poetry, drama, and prose from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and works ranging from cinema and television to video games, we will explore the ways in which humans deal with wars and their aftermath by placing them (safely?) in the artistic realm.

We will study works such as: Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Bierce, “Chickamauga”; Howells, “Editha”; British poetry of WWI; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Camus, The Plague; M*A*S*H* selected episodes; The Producers (1968); O'Brien, The Things They Carried; and paintings and posters related to the wars we will discuss.

HON 290 - Honors Special Topics - Humanities/US Diversity (3 credits)

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HON 293 - ( credits)

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HON 296 - ( credits)

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