Summer 2017 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 100 - Reading and Writing Rhetorically (4 credits)

Intensive practice in reading and writing critically and rhetorically, with attention to how those change according to purpose and situation. Introduction to rhetorical concepts and elements with application to a variety of academic, professional, or civic texts. Exploration of principles of argument and organization. Guidance in developing flexible, self-aware reading and composing processes. Practice in seeking, providing, and responding to constructive feedback. Practice with making choices about grammar, mechanics, and style appropriate to specific rhetorical situations. Extensive writing practice and individualized coaching to support ongoing development as a writer. Intended as preparation for ENG 101.

ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

200-level Courses


ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

Significant British authors chosen from among such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens, Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, and Yeats.Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 andeither ENG 261 or 262.

ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

300-level Courses


ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

400-level Courses


ENG 448 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (1 credit)

500-level Courses


ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study the African American literary tradition and experience from the perspective of African American writers. Designed to familiarize students with the study of literature at a progressive level, this course is a reading intense exercise in “close,” critical reading. During the course of the semester, we will explore the development of our country’s literature over the last half century, from the black perspective.  

With the help of several seminal texts, including short stories and novels, we will conduct a survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture as we understand it, with an emphasis on fiction (drama and poetry) from, roughly, World War II to the present. As literary critics and social historians, we will attempt to show how these texts in turn define America as we see it, think it, and/or hope it to be. Sometimes this conception is in correlation with that of the dominant culture; often, however, we will see, it is at odds with it.  This duality becomes, very much, the basis for African American consciousness in the twentieth century, something Du Bois labels a pervasive sense of “two-ness.” In addition, we will see how our chosen artists negotiate history, and how the past is ever-present in the African American text. 

600-level Courses


ENG 636 - Directed Readings (1-6 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

ENG 636 provides directed study in areas of special interest that are not addressed in the department's regular course offerings.  See the grad programs website for information about proposing an independent study: http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/graduate/current_students/directed_readings.php.

ENG 695 - Master's Thesis Research (1-9 credits)

ENG 699 - Master's Thesis Preparation (1-3 credits)

CRD

800-level Courses


CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)