Fall 2020 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

200-level Courses


ENG 202 - Disciplinary Perspectives in Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 207 - Studies in Poetry (3 credits)

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ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

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ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

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ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

Paul Rodman Cockshutt Jr

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Christa Williams Gala

A nuts-and-bolts class for editing different kinds of writing in the workplace--and your own. Master the mechanics of grammar, punctuation and AP Style and implement those skills to make copy more concise and interesting. We'll also cover headline writing and the telltale signs of biased writing, libel and fake news. Learn how to fact-check, edit and rework copy with a discerning eye.

ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

“Traditional Non-Western Literature”

Readings in traditional literature, in translation, from Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas.  Students will be introduced to the origins and flourishing of these oldest cultures through the oral and written stories, poems, essays and plays that have become the defining works of these societies.  At the same time we will look at the geographical, historical, and philosophical contexts from which these texts arise. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 224 - Contemporary World Literature II (3 credits)

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ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD

This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 246 - Literature of the Holocaust (3 credits)

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ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 260 - Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality (3 credits)

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ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

James Robert Knowles

This course is an introduction to English literature from early Anglo-Saxon writings to the late seventeenth century. We will read a selection of major writers and texts from the Old English period, the Anglo-Norman period (Marie de France), the Middle English period (Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe), the English Renaissance (Wyatt, Marlowe, Shakespeare), and the seventeenth century (the “metaphysical” poets), finishing in the 1660s with John Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost. Our approach to reading and discussing these texts will be twofold. First, the aesthetic approach to reading literature asks us to recognize these poems and plays as works of art with transhistorical value and enduring appeal. Secondly, the historical approach to reading literature asks us to understand the same texts as cultural objects which are deeply embedded in the times, places, and circumstances of their creation. Part of our task will be to recognize how and when our own twenty-first-century moral and aesthetic impulses (what we find beautiful or moving or gross) diverge from those of the writers we are studying. In other words, the aesthetic and the historical approaches to reading literature may sometimes be at odds with one another. Our job as readers is to notice and to describe such disconnections when they occur. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts on their own terms and to situate texts within their original cultural contexts.

ENG 262 - English Literature II (3 credits)

Anna Gibson

This survey of English literature begins in the 1660s and brings us to the 20th century, taking us on a journey through the poetry, fiction, drama, and prose of major British writers. Along the way we will focus our attention on four literary movements/periods: Romanticism, the Victorian era, modernism, and post-modernism. Studying works of literature in the context of these movements will allow us to listen to the writers’ conversations and disagreements across and within these literary categories and to situate these conversations within the changing landscape of British cultural history. How did literary texts respond to massive social changes such as industrialization, a growing population, the rise of cities, shifting gender roles and social classes, and two world wars? And how did these texts shape people’s experiences of such changes? How did writers across this time period offer new ways of thinking about the relationship between self and world? We will ask these questions as we read works by such central writers as Dryden, Pope, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Austen, Brontë, Rossetti, Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Rhys.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

This course focuses on American literature from the Civil War to the present, with particular attention to the construction of, and contests around, race, class, gender, sexuality, and aspects of national identity. Surveying this field in a comprehensive way in one semester is an impossible task, of course, given the rich range of literatures written in the United States in the last century and a half. So this course makes this difficulty its subject matter by interrogating the contested ways that ideas of “American-ness” or categories of “American” have been constructed by various writers working and living in the United States. In particular, we will focus on several dominant, and sometimes paradoxical, ways of understanding what makes American literature distinctly “American.” American literature seems to reproduce an American culture that has a particular identity distinct from other global cultures. But, at the same time, the purportedly democratic nature of our culture means that American literature produces multiple, heterogeneous cultures that tug at the notion of an identifiable shared, singular “Americanness.” Our time during the semester will focus on the literary movements of late Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism with these challenges in mind, with attention to the role that race, class, gender, and national identity play.

ENG 275 - Literature and War (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

 

We will explore how people speak of, reflect on, and tell stories about war in the context of history and the evolving technology of conflict. This course looks at writings about the experience of war both historically and thematically and does so from multiple perspectives: literary, historical and technological. Issues will include the nature and purpose of war, the role of weaponry in dictating battle, the question of a just war, the theory of deterrence, and an examination of the soldier. Texts include Sun Tzu, The IliadTales of the Heike, Patrick O'Brien’s The Ionian Mission, American, British, Russian, and Japanese views of World Wars I and II, Spycraft, Holmstedt's Band of Sisters, and Shepherd’s R&R. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 281 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction (3 credits)

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ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

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ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

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300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 314 - Technical Document Design and Editing (3 credits)

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ENG 315 - Phonetics (3 credits)

Jeffrey Ingle Mielke

This course is an introduction to phonetics: how spoken language is produced and perceived, and the physical properties of speech. An understanding of phonetics is fundamental to scientific and clinical approaches to speech and language.

ENG 316 - Introduction to News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Christa Williams Gala

Learn how to write concise stories about events and people with a special focus on the tenets of media writing, including writing leads, establishing story angles, interviewing and research, quote gathering, editing and fact-checking. Students will learn the difference between writing for print and digital platforms and practice through writing their own stories, including articles and profiles. Regular quizzes on AP Style and current events will be given.

ENG 320 - Anatomy and Physiology of Speech (3 credits)

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ENG 321 - Survey of Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

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ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

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ENG 324 - Modern English Syntax (3 credits)

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ENG 328 - Language and Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

Susan Jenny Emshwiller

Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, in-class written explorations of specific concepts, and sharing of students’ work we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. Students will learn about structure, characterization, creating dynamic dialogue, subtext, subplots, theme, exposition, etc. utilizing established screenplay formats. The course will involve studying great films and scripts, participating in critiques, and the writing and revising of original material. Over the course, students will write scenes focusing on specific screenwriting elements, and share and critique these pieces. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and will have a work-in-progress screenplay.

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 340 - Literature, Art, and Society (3 credits)

Jennifer Anne Nolan

This course will examine intersections between the literary and visual arts in the first half of the twentieth century in popular magazines, such as the Saturday Evening Post and The Crisis, artistic movements, such as Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance, and in William Faulkner’s commercially successful novel Intruder in the Dust (1948) and the cinematic adaptation of it, which bring together many of these strands.

As the twentieth century began, literary and visual artists found themselves with unprecedented opportunities for their work to be seen and their voices to be heard. Advances in printing technologies brought popular magazines into the homes of millions, where poetry, short stories, drama, illustrations, photographs, investigative journalism, and criticism intermingled in what was the mass culture of the day. Modernist experimentation in literature found its inspiration in the visual arts, and illustrations and other visual materials framed and interpreted fiction and poetry in spaces like the Saturday Evening Post, whose popularity and reach finds its modern-day equivalent in streaming services like Netflix, and The Crisis, the official magazine of the newly-formed NAACP (edited by W.E.B. Du Bois). Almost as notorious for shirking his duties at the post office to read magazines like the Post as he is for his lengthy sentences, William Faulkner was immersed in this landscape. Part Modernist, part detective novel, part incisive social commentary, we’ll end with a consideration of his 1948 novel, Intruder in the Dust, and its 1949 adaptation. Throughout we will consider how each artist comments upon, represents, challenges, and critiques prevailing social issues of their day. The course will culminate with creative projects considering what our literary works have to say to modern-day audiences. 

ENG 364 - History of Film to 1940 (3 credits)

Josie Torres Barth

This course begins with the international origins of motion pictures and traces the medium's fascinating evolution from experimental novelty to major industry and significant cultural influence. We will study the development of form, style, narrative, technology, and industry practices through several national cinemas, including French, German, British, Soviet, Japanese, and American. Along with an understanding of major and minor cinematic movements, this course seeks to give students a sense of the cultural and historical context of cinematic production.

The course includes readings and screenings, a creative video assignment with a written component, and midterm and final exams.

ENG 376 - Science Fiction (3 credits)

Thomas P. Phillips

This section of Eng 376 examines the science fiction genre from the general standpoint of its aesthetic and thematic development as aligned with historical contexts, the latter being invariably connected to technological advances. Specifically, it will follow the genre’s ongoing fascination for and insights into the category of the human.

Assessment: class participation, two formal essays, and two exams.

ENG 378 - Women & Film (3 credits)

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ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 393 - Studies in Literary Genre (3 credits)

James M. Grimwood

Section 002 - Metamorphosis

As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect. 

Literary treatments of bodily transformation (of human beings into gods, animals, plants, machines and other things; and vice versa) from Homer and Ovid to the Incredible Hulk and Spider Man, with examples from non-Western as well as—primarily—Western cultures. Treatment of the history of literary representations of change. Attention to metamorphic operations generally, including especially metaphor and other figures, translation, and cross-media adaptation. Readings in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Dante’s The Inferno, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chesnutt’s TheConjure Woman, Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis,” etc. A short paper and a longer paper; a midterm exam and a final exam.

Satisfies world-literature and genre requirements in the English major. Serves as a literature elective in the LLT major. Satisfies a CHASS literature requirement. Satisfies an NCSU humanities requirement. 


 

Sujata S. Mody

Section 1- Drama in Modern India 

This course provides a focused treatment of drama in modern India as it has evolved since the late 19th century. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre, especially as an intricate weave of modern vernacular traditions with both classical Sanskrit and western dramatic traditions. After a brief introduction to the classical Sanskrit tradition as well as pre-colonial folk and devotional theater traditions, which remained central points of reference through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will move on to the main focus of the course, colonial and post-colonial theater in India. All readings are available in English translation.

 

Section 3 - Modern Hindi-Urdu Short Story

This course provides a focused treatment of the modern short story in Hindi/Urdu. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre from the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern genre in the colonial and nationalist periods in South Asian literary history; students will also be introduced to some writing from India and Pakistan in the post-Independence era. All readings are available in English translation.

ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Nilakshi Phukan

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to the availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

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ENG 399 - Contemporary Literature (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

Maurice Blanchot’s famous book The Writing of the Disaster meditates on the problems of writing on catastrophe and loss in the twentieth century, a century of epic catastrophe and loss. This course will examine writers who focus on social catastrophe (World War II; the Holocaust, the suffocating effects of totalitarianism; exile and 9/11) as well as the slow-motion catastrophes that afflict civilizations (especially the predatory capitalism of recent memory and the rise of religious fanaticism and terrorism). The writing of disaster is also, inevitably, writing on that which is taboo—that which must not be said, which often includes sex, violence and death in civilizations that have come apart or are under great strain. How do civilizations deal with disaster? How do writers write on disaster and taboo subjects? What strategies do they employ? How do they (and we) remember? Texts will include Primo Levi’s Survival In Auschwitz, Allen Ginsbert, Howl, Wislawa Szymborksa, Selected Poems, Cormac McCarthy’s Child of God, Aleksandar Hemon, The Lazarus Project, WG Sebald’s The Emigrants, Peter Riley’s A Map of Faring, Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, CD Wright’s One Big Self, Frank Bidart, Music Like Dirt, Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Claudia Rankine, Citizen and Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being. Formal requirements: a midterm exam, a final exam, two out of class essays. And lots of discussion.

400-level Courses


ENG 400 - Applied Criticism (3 credits)

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ENG 411 - Rhetorical Criticism (3 credits)

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ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Paul Christopher Isom

The purpose of the course is to prepare the student for advanced reporting in print/broadcast media. Topics can include in-depth coverage of local, state, and national government; criminal justice and the courts; business and economics; science and health matters; coverage of education, science, religion and sports. This course will seek to enhance both the student’s knowledge of these topics and the student’s ability to successfully report on them.

ENG 421 - Computer Documentation Design (3 credits)

Melissa F. Hannah
The purpose of ENG 421 is to introduce you to the principles of technical documentation and
technical communication: how technical communicators move their readers to beliefs or actions
through the skilled use of verbal, visual, and interactive discourse. The course works through the
theory and design of documentation for computer hardware and software, including user guides,
reference manuals, quick reference guides, tutorials, and online documentation for various media
delivery systems. This course also trains you in alternative forms of documentation: testing
procedures, usability testing, and collaborative revision. This course will discuss issues of
accessibility and inclusivity when training you in these forms of technical documentation. The
course is part of the Certificate in Professional Writing.

ENG 426 - Analyzing Style (3 credits)

David M Rieder

Introduction to the analysis of style in print-based texts, hypertexts, and visual culture. The semester will be divided among three analytical approaches. First, we begin with Richard Lanham's textbook, Analyzing Prose, which introduces you to the important roles that style plays in prose writing. This first section will offer you a grounding in the rhetorical canon of style. Next, we'll study the changing role of style in the electronic form of hypertext writing. We'll focus our attention on Shelley Jackson's hypertext novel, Patchwork Girl. Finally, we'll look up and off the page/screen to analyze (postmodern) American culture, which is heavily influenced by communicational issues related to style.

In addition to two 6-7 page essays (and other shorter writing assignments), you will learn how to write a hypertextual essay in StorySpace, the same software program that Jackson used to write her hypertext novel.

ENG 439 - Studies in English Renaissance Literature (3 credits)

Margaret Simon

The English Renaissance Remixed

You've probably read some Shakespeare, and might have learned about the European Renaissance in history class. But what do the term and period really signify, especially for literature written in English? This course introduces you to the poets, politicians, historians, and cultural figures of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. We'll read the work of well-known writers like William Shakespeare and John Donne, but we'll also spend a lot of time encountering authors you've likely never heard of, particularly women writers and non-elite individuals writing for a growing print market. We'll consider the production of English literature within a global context. How, for example, can we speak of an English cultural Renaissance ("rebirth"), with all of its positive connotations, during a period that saw the brutal establishment of England's settler plantations and the slave trade? We'll consider how we can best interpret the signal works of an era and culture that often suppressed the voices of anyone outside of a male English elite. With trips to the library's Special Collections and work with texts in their original print and manuscript forms, we will consider what we can learn about both well-known and marginalized voices through archival research and non-canonical literature.

ENG 451 - Chaucer (3 credits)

Timothy Linwood Stinson

This course is a detailed introduction to the 14th-century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer through The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, his most famous works. We will read selected tales alongside excerpts from Chaucer’s sources as well as associated historical and literary works from 14th-century England. We will work together to understand how Chaucer drew upon a wide range sources, both English and Continental, to create a new form of English poetry, as well as how The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde reflect literary culture, social upheaval, linguistic change, and political turmoil in late medieval England. We will also focus on critical reception of Chaucer's literature, including how his works have been read through a variety of critical and theoretical frameworks.

ENG 455 - Literacy in the U.S. (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

At this moment, astonishingly complex processes are at work as you read, interpret, and reflect on these words. On a basic level, you're making use of abilities that you have been practicing most of your life, through formal schooling, through family educational practices, through work-related experiences, through your own self-sponsored activities (including online interaction), and through daily routines. At a higher level, you bring to your reading tacit assumptions about the role of literacy in your development and in a society that demands higher literacy and uses it to establish criteria for your success. In a course that focuses on literacy, reading the very word literacy calls into play many beliefs about our class system, economic and political structures, educational institutions, cultures, and media.

In this course, we'll explore the personal functions of literacy but soon extend them to wider dimensions of literacy in our society and in our educational institutions, including questions such as these: What are the competing theories about how best to teach children and adolescents to read? What actually happens when we read? Is the Internet helping or harming advanced literacy? What’s the relationship between reading and writing? Why are 32 million Americans illiterate and why do 21% read below a 5th-grade level? How can we use literacy in the service of social justice? Projects include a literacy autoethnography, a literacy interview, and a “design-your-own” literacy inquiry.

(Required for English majors within TED)

ENG 464 - British Literature and the Founding of Empire (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 470 - American Literature, Twentieth Century and Beyond (3 credits)

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ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

James Robert Knowles

Making Amends: Narratives of Transgression and Atonement – Medieval to Modern

Justice, mercy, clemency, pardon. Contrition, confession, satisfaction. Apology, reconciliation, restitution. Reparation, rehabilitation, recovery. Reform, rebirth, reboot. As these word-clusters suggest (and there are many more we could add), human beings have developed a rich vocabulary around the connection between “doing wrong” and “making right.” This course takes as its object the literary representation of the cultural practices surrounding transgression, atonement, and starting over, from the high middle ages to the present day, with particular focus on medieval and early modern texts in English. We will begin with Dante’s Purgatorio, wherein the landscape itself is a picture-model of the catholic sacrament of penance. A cluster of texts in Middle English (Sir Gawain, Chaucer’s Wife of Bath, and Piers Plowman) will enhance and complicate this picture, extending the institutional contexts for atonement narratives beyond the church and into secular centers of power – law courts and royal chambers – and onto the streets and pilgrim routes and pasturelands of medieval England. In the sixteenth century, the Protestant Reformation insists on a radical rethinking of the language and practice of confession and forgiveness, resulting in increased pressure on individuals to work out the terms of reconciliation on their own; while at the same time the state apparatus for adjudicating such disputes grows ever more robust. Two plays by Shakespeare, Othello and The Tempest, will help us to think through these changes. Some short stories, essays, and comics by Flannery O’Connor, James Baldwin, and Ta-Nehisi Coates will serve as transition to our own contemporary cultural moment and the intersections of gender, race, and class with narratives of making amends. We will finish the course with the British writer Ian McEwan’s remarkable novel about transgression and memory, Atonement.

ENG 492 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

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ENG 494 - Special Topics in Linguistics (3 credits)

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500-level Courses


ENG 508 - Usability Studies for Technical Communication (3 credits)

Douglas M. Walls

Our class examines the usability testing of design and web sites as well as a brief introduction to user experience (UX) studies. We will discuss the nature of design and usability especially how they interact to make solutions easy or difficult to use for particular audiences. We will examine a variety of testing including inquiry based, qualitative, and quantitative testing methods. We will discuss the trade-offs among these various types of tests and will analyze which ones are most appropriate for various rhetorical and developmental situations. You will engage in multiple methods for conducting tests when time and funding preclude lab-based testing.

ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

This course provides an introduction to foundational theories and research in the field of composition studies, and is a prerequisite for graduate students who are assigned to teach ENG 101 in the First-Year Writing Program. During the semester, we focus on the dynamic and sometimes competing nature of theories and research, keeping in mind the historical and political contexts in which they emerged. The goal of the course is to examine assumptions underlying current theory and research and to explore implications for the teaching and practice of writing. Conducted as a seminar, the course is designed to help new members of the field to:

  • familiarize themselves with the range of voices and theoretical assumptions underlying the teaching of writing;
  • understand various histories of the field of composition studies;
  • become acquainted with major journals and resources in the field of composition, sufficient for conducting independent explorations of research and theory on topics of interest;
  • develop a reading knowledge of research methods in composition, sufficient for interpreting and evaluating the results of published research in the field;
  • apply knowledge of the field’s history, theory, and research in analyzing new contexts, developing new pedagogical insights, and raising new questions for research.

ENG 512 - Theory and Research In Professional Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 516 - Rhetorical Criticism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

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ENG 517 - Advanced Technical Writing, Editing and Document Design (3 credits)

Jason Swarts PhD

The purpose of ENG 517 is to introduce students to the rhetorical practices of technical communication, how technical communicators move their readers to beliefs or actions through the skilled use of verbal, visual, and interactive discourse. This course is primarily practice oriented. We will be writing and designing in media and forms that are common to technical communication, including traditional print-based documents (like descriptions and procedures) but also contemporary and technically-challenging formats like images, video, and structured content (DITA). I will also ask you to work on the finer points of your technical style by learning how to write clearly, cohesively, concisely, and concretely. At the end of the semester, you will have the start of a portfolio of writing and design that you can take to an interview.

ENG 520 - Science Writing for the Media (3 credits)

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ENG 525 - Variety In Language (3 credits)

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ENG 527 - Discourse Analysis (3 credits)

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ENG 528 - Sociophonetics (3 credits)

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ENG 534 - Quantitative Analysis in Sociolinguistics (3 credits)

Robin M Dodsworth

This course is an advanced survey of quantitative methods in variationist sociolinguistics, to be taken after ENG 523. We will look in detail at the quantitative methods used most often to evaluate language variation and change: multivariate linear and logistic regression, mixed effects models, and PCA. Whereas ENG 523 gives a practical introduction to these and other methods, this course delves into the math and also takes a more nuanced practical approach. In addition to statistical techniques, the course involves detailed graphical analysis of linguistic data using R. As such, basic proficiency in R is required.

ENG 539 - Seminar In World Literature (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

This course examines modernist literary, filmic, and artistic modernist movements of the twentieth century in a global context. The traditional story of modernist literature was for a long time a narrowly circumscribed affair, focusing mainly on Anglo-European literature produced between 1914-1945 and enlivened by an occasional dose of Irish and American expatriate writers (a very small way that global movement was a recognized part of modernism, conventionally defined). But over the last decade or so, the fields of cultural studies, critical race theory, women's studies, postcolonial studies, political theory, and cultural geography have helped modernist studies become more responsive to the dynamics of colonization and imperialism, to race, and to ideas about nation and sovereignty. The result has been an expansion of modernism’s geographic borders (to imagine “modernist literature” to mean more than texts produced in Paris/London/New York) as well as a push to extend its temporal borders later into the twentieth century (as one scholar has put it, to assume modernism exists between the two world wars is like one hand clapping).

This course will explore an array of Anglo/American/European and non-western modernist writers spanning the globe and will feature texts that are both familiar and less well-known in the modernist canon. Primary authors will be drawn from this slightly longer list: James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, French surrealist novelist Rene Crevel, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Jean Rhys, Albert Camus, Sarojini Naidu, Rabindranath Tagore, Premchand, Mulk Raj Anand, Naguib Mahfouz, Tayeb Salih, Amitav Ghosh, and/or Arundati Roy. Films may include Borderline (1930) or Dark Sands/Jericho (1937). The first half of the twentieth century will be our main emphasis but the last portion of the course will push beyond this. Alongside primary works, we will read some scholarly texts that address empire, cosmopolitanism, globalization, geopolitics, translation, diaspora, and planetarity.

Cross-listed with FL 539

ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study the African American literary tradition and experience from the perspective of African American writers. Designed to familiarize students with the study of literature at a progressive level, this course is a reading intense exercise in “close,” critical reading. During the course of the semester, we will explore the development of our country’s literature over the last half century, from the black perspective.  

With the help of several seminal texts, including short stories and novels, we will conduct a survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture as we understand it, with an emphasis on fiction (drama and poetry) from, roughly, World War II to the present. As literary critics and social historians, we will attempt to show how these texts in turn define America as we see it, think it, and/or hope it to be. Sometimes this conception is in correlation with that of the dominant culture; often, however, we will see, it is at odds with it.  This duality becomes, very much, the basis for African American consciousness in the twentieth century, something Du Bois labels a pervasive sense of “two-ness.” In addition, we will see how our chosen artists negotiate history, and how the past is ever-present in the African American text. 

ENG 551 - Chaucer (3 credits)

Timothy Linwood Stinson

This course is a detailed introduction to the 14th-century English poet Geoffrey Chaucer through The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, his most famous works. We will read selected tales alongside excerpts from Chaucer’s sources as well as associated historical and literary works from 14th-century England. We will work together to understand how Chaucer drew upon a wide range sources, both English and Continental, to create a new form of English poetry, as well as how The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde reflect literary culture, social upheaval, linguistic change, and political turmoil in late medieval England. We will also focus on critical reception of Chaucer's literature, including how his works have been read through a variety of critical and theoretical frameworks.

ENG 558 - Studies In Shakespeare (3 credits)

Christopher James Crosbie

Twisted Comedy: Shakespeare and the Absurd, Dark, and Joyous


In this class, we will read, watch, enjoy, and discuss the many forms of twisted comedy that permeate Shakespeare’s plays.  As a genre, comedy (so the conventional narrative goes) drives toward amicable resolution and the reaffirmation of the positive elements of human existence.  As with all generic classifications, however, this tells only part of the truth. Shakespearean comedy, for example, overflows with disturbingly dark plotlines, ambiguous resolutions, and even hints of tragedy to come.  Measure for Measure takes as its central narrative the attempted sexual assault on a woman entering a convent.  All’s Well That Ends Well depicts a love story between a woman and man who will do everything possible to avoid her.  Both plays stage ‘bed tricks’ where lovers are duped into sleeping with someone they never intended to be with.  Plays such as Othello launch their tragic tales by staging, for a full half of a play, a narrative that is generically comedic.  And, at the end of Shakespeare’s career, the dramatist creates comedies that include, among other disturbing matters, slavery, the death of children, sex trafficking, dismemberment by a bear (!!), and unrepentant villains who conclude their plays just as murderous as when the stories began.  Do the dark elements of Shakespearean comedy trouble our notions of genre? Do they sit in contradistinction to comedy as conventionally received? Or are they in some fashion essential for constituting the positive vision of humanity we’ve come to expect when we hear the word “comedy?” Through six plays, ample group discussion, and the comparative study of multiple film adaptations, this course will examine these and related questions.  Along the way, we’ll situate Shakespeare’s plays in his own culture and re-think their position in our own as well.

ENG 560 - Victorian Poetry and Critical Prose (3 credits)

Antony Howard Harrison

Literature often serves as a form of cultural commentary and intervention. Today we see it functioning this way in novels, poetry, drama, and music (think especially rap and hip-hop) lyrics that expose issues related to race, economic inequity, and gender relations. Traditionally the lyrics of folk music also present social or political criticism. 

 In Victorian England poetry similarly served as a platform for cultural critique, and it was especially forceful in part because of its formal qualities, such as meter, rhyme, and the use of powerful similes and metaphors, along with other memorable figures of speech. Because of poetry's standing as "high art,” it was also often perceived as culturally authoritative: it was memorized in the schools, published in periodicals, quoted in homes, sermons, and Parliamentary blue books and speeches.

In this class, we will examine the cultural critiques embedded in a range of Victorian poems, whose poetic forms (sonnet, lyric, epic, dramatic monologue, or elegy) are often employed specifically to address political, social, religious, economic, and moral issues such as gender relations, imperialism, capitalism, industrialism, class relations, religious faith or doubt, poverty and prostitution. The poets we study will be equally balanced between men and women, and we will look at working-class poets as well as the more conventionally canonized middle-and-upper-class poets. Those we will read include Letitia Landon, Felicia Hemans, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, Dante Rossetti, William Morris, Matthew Arnold, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Amy Levy, Michael Field (the pseudonym of two women), Thomas Hardy, and working class poets of both genders.

Requirements: students will present one position paper on an assigned reading, write one brief essay (textual analysis), and write a longer research essay.

ENG 582 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

Cormac McCarthy 

This seminar-style course will study the life and works of Cormac McCarthy from his earliest novel to his most recent work.Students will write a seminar paper and complete a presentation to the class, as well as a series of smaller papers.

ENG 585 - Studies In Film (3 credits)

Josie Torres Barth

Twilight Modernity: TV History and Social and Technological Change

This course will use the science-fiction/horror anthology TV program The Twilight Zone in its multiple incarnations (1959-1964, 1985-1989, 2019-present) as a lens to examine television history and technological and social change. Through both its form and its content, The Twilight Zone staged the anxieties that attended television in its first decade of mass use, and developed an innovative mode of address to articulate and work through these anxieties for its viewers. While our focus will be on the original version, we will trace the program across its changing formats, from the early 1960s shift from live to recorded TV, through network restructuring in the 1980s, to streaming and media convergence in the present day. We will consider the developing role of the television writer and its relation to questions of media authorship and legitimation, and position the program in current debates in the field of television studies. Through the program’s espoused postwar liberalism, its veiled critique of 1960s race relations, and its representations of gender, we will examine how the metaphor of a “twilight zone” represents an unstable in-between state symbolizing various forms of nascent social change.

 To round out our understanding of these media ecosystems, we will analyze a variety of complementary texts across media. Possible additional texts include 1940s horror radio, live teleplays from the late 1940s and early 1950s, “fantastic family” sitcoms from the 1960s, episodes of anthology TV programs such as Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955-1962), One Step Beyond (1959-1961), The Outer Limits (1963), Night Gallery (1969-1973), and Black Mirror (2011-present), and films from classical Hollywood to B-movies.

ENG 587 - Interdisciplinary Studies in English (3 credits)

Helen Jane Burgess

Multimodal Writing and Critical Making - ENG 587/798-005

This class will cover theories and practice in the fields known variously as multimodal composition and critical making, exploring in particular how we can use 3d objects and design as a “way of thinking” about texts and the world. We will focus on building and working with objects that convey complex informational and argumentative meaning, and developing a vocabulary to talk about the work we produce.

Includes both analog and digital components; some physical computing (arduino, circuit stickers etc), but will assume no technical knowledge. Students will work collaboratively in class sessions to produce objects and texts. The second half of the semester will be devoted to individual and/or group projects (based on preference), with the option to produce seminar papers for publication.

ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Eduardo C Corral

An intensive practicum in the writing of poetry: students will write and revise their own poetry, participate in a weekly workshop of evaluation and criticism, and read extensively the work of contemporary poets. This course is designed to give students extensive practice in the writing of poetry – from drafting to revision—and to demonstrate the close relationship between reading and writing through the evaluation of creative work by contemporary poets, as well as original student poetry.

ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 592 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (1-6 credits)

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600-level Courses


ENG 624 - Teaching College Composition (3 credits)

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ENG 669 - Literature, Methods, and the Profession (3 credits)

John D Morillo

Methods and the Profession

This course introduces you to the world of research; the current profession; your department and our research and writing expectations for you. Class lectures and discussions will include expanding domains of current research materials available in both print and electronic media; the variety of methods in current English studies. You will become familiar with some of the intellectual endeavors that make up modern research in the humanities, begin your own research, and refine the formal, professional oral and written presentation of your information.

ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3-6 credits)

Helen Jane Burgess
Topic: Methods and Theories in Media
This class offers an interdisciplinary methodological perspective on a broad range of interrelated humanistic disciplines, and will provide an overview of theories and methods in the following fields:
  • Screen-based media and transmedia studies 
  • Digital rhetorics
  • Critical Code Studies
  • Digital humanities
  • Critical making and multimodal composition
  • Preservation and archiving strategies
 Special emphasis will be placed on the role of the archive in media scholarship and practice.

800-level Courses


ENG 810 - Directed Readings in English Studies (1-6 credits)

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CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 701 - ( credits)

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CRD 704 - Communication, Technologies, and Pedagogy (3 credits)

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800-level Courses


CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

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CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

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CRD 895 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9 credits)

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CRD 899 - Doctoral Dissertation Preparation (1-9 credits)

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HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

Catherine Mary Mainland

HON 202: The Art of War

Whether nations win or lose, war has always left its mark on the arts. This course will take a comparative look at artistic responses to the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and modern military campaigns. Through our examination of the history and social psychology of war, we will pay constant attention to the infinitely human urge to use art to deal with the inhumane, comedy to combat tragedy, and story-telling to work through feelings of guilt, loss, inadequacy, or doubt. With readings of poetry, drama, and prose from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and works ranging from cinema and television to video games, we will explore the ways in which humans deal with wars and their aftermath by placing them (safely?) in the artistic realm.

We will study works such as: Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Bierce, “Chickamauga”; Howells, “Editha”; British poetry of WWI; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Camus, The Plague; M*A*S*H* selected episodes; The Producers (1968); O'Brien, The Things They Carried; and paintings and posters related to the wars we will discuss.

Paul Camm Fyfe

Data and the Human

We are living in the era of big data. At the same time, big data is shaping how we live, how we define the boundaries of private and public selves, how we make decisions, and how we are governed and manipulated. In other words, “data” no longer refers to electronic information alone, but to the emerging conditions that are redefining our humanity. This seminar invites students to identify and understand these changes across contexts including democracy and surveillance, identity and algorithms, education, artificial intelligence, and the environment. We will read a range of materials from science fiction to tech journalism to cultural studies. Additionally, with the help of hands-on workshops, we will try several entry-level experiments with data, from trying to acquire and control our own personal data, to visualizing and researching open data sets. No previous experience or special technical skills are required beyond basic familiarity with a computer.

HON 290 - Honors Special Topics - Humanities/US Diversity (3 credits)

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HON 293 - ( credits)

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HON 296 - ( credits)

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