Spring 2018 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

200-level Courses


ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

Thomas P. Phillips

This section of Studies in Fiction examines various narrative forms and themes that challenge conventional modes of thought, discourse and reading. Through a selection of novels and short stories we will consider distinctions between such poles as convention and radicalism and high and low fiction to determine not only their validity or invalidity but their function with regards to the lived life of a reader. Authors include Edgar Allan Poe, Isaac Asimov, Raymond Carver, Shirley Jackson, and Don DeLillo.

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature (3 credits)

ENG 221 - Literature of the Western World I (3 credits)

ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

ENG 224 - Contemporary World Literature II (3 credits)

ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

Significant British authors chosen from among such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens, Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, and Yeats.Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 andeither ENG 261 or 262.

ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

Significant American authors chosen from among such figures as Franklin, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Frost, Faulkner, Hemingway, and Morrison.Credit will not be given for both ENG 252 and either ENG 265 or 266.

ENG 260 - Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality (3 credits)

ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of English literature to 1660, including Old English, Middle English, and Renaissance writing, focusing on such central authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Credit will not be given for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

Credit is not allowed for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of American literature from the beginnings to the Civil War, including such central authors as Edwards, Franklin, Irving, Emerson, Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Stowe, Douglass, Thoreau, and Whitman. Credit will not be given for both ENG 265 and ENG 252.

ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

ENG 267 - LGBTQI Literature in the U.S. (3 credits)

Chronological survey of works of literature by and about gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex communities in the U.S. Primary texts will be considered in historical, political, and literary contexts. Brief consideration of early works from colonial period and 19th century with primary focus on 20th and 21st century texts.

ENG 275 - Literature and War (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

Literature and War asks how people speak of, reflect on and tell stories about war in the context of history and the evolving technology of armed conflict. Issues to be addressed will include the nature and purpose of war, the role of weaponry in dictating battle, the question of a just war, the theory of deterrence, and an examination of the soldier. These topics will be approached from multiple perspectives: literary, historical, technological, psychological, social, and tactical. (Fulfills GEP Humanities requirement, Global Knowledge co req, and HSS Lit 1 or Lit 2 requirement.)

ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

Introduction to the basic elements and principles of three genres of creative writing: poetry, fiction and drama. Reading and class discussion of student work. Recommended for students with no prior experience in creative writing.

ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing short prose fiction. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of fiction.

ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

Comprehensive study of various approaches to writing about film. Primary focus is on the critical and evaluative practice involved in writing film criticism for non-academic audiences. Film screenings, discussion of assigned readings, and in-classwriting workshops aid students in preparing a portfolio of film writing that includes film reviews of various lengths.

300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

ENG 314 - Technical Document Design and Editing (3 credits)

ENG 316 - Introduction to News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Prerequisite: ENG 214, ENG 101
Techniques of writing news stories and feature articles. Components of newsworthiness, examination of evidence, interview techniques, varied writing styles. Role of newspapers and journalism in America.

ENG 321 - Survey of Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

ENG 325 - Spoken and Written Traditions of American English Dialects (3 credits)

Caroline Marie Myrick
Prerequisite: ENG 101
Basic issues in the study of language; linguistic terminology and categories; grammatical traditions and topics such as prescriptivism and descriptivism, standard and non-standard, orality and literacy; language acquisition and awareness; language aesthetics and ethics.

ENG 326 - History of the English Language (3 credits)

Prerequisite: ENG 101
Development of the English language from its Indo-European origins to the present. Emphasis on historical and comparative linguistic methodology and on changes in sound, syntax, and meaning.

ENG 327 - Language and Gender (3 credits)

ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

Susan Jenny Emshwiller

Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, and original writing, we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. Students will learn about structure, characterization, creating dynamic dialogue, subtext, subplots, theme, exposition, etc utilizing established screenplay formats. The course will involve studying great films and scripts, participating in critiques, and the writing and revising of original material. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and will have completed multiple scenes.

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 341 - Literature and Science (3 credits)

John D Morillo

Ludmilla Jordanova, in “Science and Literature” (1986), wrote that “virtually everything in our culture conspires to reinforce a separation between the study of science and the pursuit of the humanities, both of which are needed to understand the social and cultural history of science.” This course tracks the imaginative potentials, social repercussions, and interdisciplinary mixing of literature and science since the emergence of empiricism in the sixteenth century. Well before literature and science divided into "two cultures." they supplied a fruitful crossover for ideas about how and why the world works and how we gain new knowledge. Even with the development of modern disciplines, literature plays an important role in cultural assessments of scientific discovery and education. Students will read a selection of works from literary as well as scientific writers, analyzing texts and historical contexts and producing written arguments within an interdisciplinary framework. Authors may include Robert Boyle and Margaret Cavendish from the 17th century, Joseph Priestly and Erasmus Darwin from the 18th century; Charles Darwin and Henry Thoreau and H. G Wells from the 19th century; Arthur Miller, Francis Galton, Aldous Huxley, and Rachel Carson from the 20th century.

ENG 350 - Professional Internships (3 credits)

Directed work experience for CHASS majors including work-site mentoring and evaluation. Department supervision includes course work directed toward designing employment application materials, developing a portfolio of professional work or relevant research paper, considering a variety of career options, and reading literature on workplace socialization. Students must provide their own transportation to the internship site. Modest liability insurance fee required.

Visit the English Department Internship Program website for more information.

ENG 370 - American Fiction, Twentieth Century and Beyond (3 credits)

ENG 374 - History of Film From 1940 (3 credits)

Devin A. Orgeron PhD

This course explores the aesthetic, technological, and economic developments of the second half of the cinematic century. Students will explore films from Italy, France, Britain, Germany, Japan, India, Iran, Czechoslovakia, and Cuba. The course is designed to familiarize students with important cinematic movements, the key players and films within those movements, and their larger historical context. Through screenings, readings, class discussions, and a series of exams, students will learn to navigate the terrain of cinematic history, gaining demonstrable critical insight into the politics, aesthetics, and philosophical debates that shape it.

ENG 375 - African American Cinema (3 credits)

ENG 376 - Science Fiction (3 credits)

Thomas P. Phillips

This section of Eng 376 examines the science fiction genre from the general standpoint of its aesthetic and thematic development as aligned with historical contexts, the latter being invariably connected to technological advances. Specifically, it will follow the genre’s ongoing fascination for and insights into the category of the human.

Assessment: class participation, two formal essays, and two exams.

ENG 377 - Fantasy (3 credits)

Brian Blackley

Representative works in the genre of fantasy from Beowulf to Bilbo Baggins. Primary focus on the heroic quest, including aspects such as the search for revelation/transformation, the demands of leadership, the value of supporting figures (the wise old man, the good mother, the helper), and the supernatural/magical as key to success in the supreme ordeal. Prior reading of works by J. R. R. Tolkien and J. K. Rowling recommended but not required. There will be two tests, a presentation, and an essay.

ENG 381 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Catherine A Warren

In this class, students learn to work with a genre that marries storytelling and journalism. One writer described creative nonfiction as “true stories, well told.” It is a broad genre that includes New Journalism, Literary Journalism, and Narrative Nonfiction. It includes personal essays, features, profiles, and memoir. Students will read exemplary works from Joan Didion, David Sedaris, Susan Orleans, John Edgar Wideman, Rebecca Skloot, Annie Dillard, and John McPhee, among many others. Students will also consider some of the ethics of creative nonfiction. The majority of students’ time will be spent learning the tools and techniques of immersion reporting and research and creating their own works of creative nonfiction. The class will run partly as a workshop, partly as a seminar, with outside readings, and at least two student-instructor conferences during the semester.

ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

This course will focus on the experiences of individual migrants and migrant communities particularly in Europe–though we will also consider a number of texts and films from other contexts, e.g. the US and India–which have inspired a number of important recent feature films, novels, documentaries, and theoretical debates about transnational and national identity in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Some of the questions we will consider are:

  • What are some of the differences and commonalities between the experiences of immigrant and so-called “native” communities within the US and contemporary Europe?
  • And what obstacles (in the form of racism, racial profiling, xenophobia, ultra-nationalism, anti-Semitism, the exploitation of young women forced into prostitution by those facilitating their emigration to Western Europe, etc. ) are working against what some have referred to as utopian/idealistic visions of a borderless European Union or a unified, less deeply divided United States? What can works of literature, films and other media teach us about the history of immigration in the US, Europe, and other parts of the world (such as the Middle East) as well as a shift in attitudes, among millennials in particular, that is interrogating the very notion of national identity as well as what it means to be patriotic or nationalistic in a world that is rapidly becoming more globalized.
  • On the other hand, what forces are working to make these ideals of multiculturalism, diversity, and productive dialogue between groups affiliated with different religious, ethnic, immigrant, and/or linguistic communities within Europe and United States feasible? We will also focus on questions concerning the politics of representation and narration in film and literature (i.e., how do films and literary texts represent history and memory, racial, national, cultural, or gender identity, and what are the political implications of those representations?). Authors/filmmakers to be considered include Charlie Chaplin (The Immigrant); Michael Winterbottom (In This World); Junot Díaz (The Brief Wonderful Life of Oscar Wao); Zadie Smith (White Teeth); Mark Mazower (Dark Continent; Europe's Twentieth Century); Aki Karousmäki (Le Havre/the Haven); Stephen Frears (Dirty Pretty Things); Gianni Amelio (L'America), Roberto Saviano (Gomorrah), Sandhya Suri (I for India); Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne (La Promesse/The Promise), Michael Showalter (The Big Sick), Mathieu Kassovitz (La Haine/The Hate), Cristian Nemescu (California Dreamin'); Silvain George (May They Rest in Revolt [Figures of War]), Fatih Akin (Head-On), and David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises), among others.

ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

English 388 is a fiction writing class for students who have taken Eng 287 or 288 or have experience writing stories. Though I believe that no writer is ever beyond issues of craft, I will assume you have some familiarity with the essentials of fiction writing.

Students will be asked to read a considerable number of published works of fiction, to write exercises early in the semester, and to write two short stories and one revision. You will do written critiques of the manuscripts of your classmates and discuss them in workshop session that will take up our class time after the first month or so. Grades will be based on your critiques of other student stories, your own stories, and your revision.

ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will give special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems. Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision. The course expects students to be familiar with the themes, techniques and elements of poetry writing. We will read single collections of contemporary poems by a number of recommended authors. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and will create a handmade broadside. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works may be reviewed. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet and participate in a class poetry reading. The course stresses reading as a writer and provides a foundation from which students can pursue further studies in poetry writing.

ENG 390 - Classical Backgrounds of English Literature (3 credits)

James Robert Knowles

Thomas Hardy opens his elegiac sequence “Poems of 1912-1913,” written for his recently deceased wife, with a Latin epigraph: veteris vestigia flammae—the vestiges of an old flame. In their original context in Virgil’s Aeneid, these words are spoken by Dido, Queen of Carthage, to express her desire for the Trojan hero who arouses feelings she thought were long dead. Centuries before Thomas Hardy, however, English literary tradition had made a habit of copying, borrowing, and stealing from ancient Greek and Latin sources. This course studies a selection of the ancient flames that have burned most brightly in the English literary imagination. We will read selected texts from Homer, Sappho, Aeschylus, Plato, Aristotle, Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, Augustine, and Boethius. Student projects will do the work of connecting these precursor texts with their British and American followers, including but not limited to: Chaucer, Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare, Milton, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Hardy, Stevens, Eliot, Pound, Auden, Bishop, Heaney, Rowling, and Springsteen. All Latin and Greek texts will be read in translation. Counts for GEP Humanities credit.

ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to the availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

This class is an introduction to User Experience (UX) and designed to help students interested in technical communication explore a set of concepts to the broader field of UX research. People who work in UX are strategists who assist in the creation of products, services, and policies across digital and physical environments. They contribute to the processes of design, research, and development of information tools. Designing rhetorical experiences requires empathy for people and an understanding of context of use.

In this class students will explore concepts from rhetoric, design, and development that are foundational strategies used by UX practitioners. Thanks to the ongoing growth and convergence of the internet and software industries, UX designers an emerging and viable professional field of study for those interested in technical communication. The content of this class capitalizes on a vital need for people-centered experiences across converging technologies, services, and processes. Students will engage in inventive problem solving and ideation of a project as well as develop products through user personas, journey mapping, and wireframing. Finally, students will learn to develop live interactive prototypes of software solutions. No previous technological experience is required to take this course but a willingness to learn new digital tools is.

400-level Courses


ENG 411 - Rhetorical Criticism (3 credits)

ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Robert C. Kochersberger

Advanced work in writing news stories, profiles, features and investigative stories.  Includes analysis and critical reading of print media.  Assumes thorough knowledge of AP style and rudiments of news and feature writing. The course will be taught in two segments. For the first, students will work in pairs to cover beats on campus and in the community. For the second, students will work together as an investigative team looking into sexual assault on campus, with the goal of a class publication on the topic.

ENG 422 - Writing Theory and the Writing Process (3 credits)

ENG 425 - Analysis of Scientific and Technical Writing (3 credits)

This course examines the role of communication in the development and exchange of scientific and technical knowledge. We will first investigate how scientific writing developed as a genre from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century. Then we will read introductory works on rhetorical theory and examine the purposes, issues, audiences, and conventions of written communication in a variety of scientific and engineering contexts. After exploring the values and purposes that shape scientific arguments, we will use these rhetorical principles and scientific values as critical frameworks for analyzing the role of communication in science and technology. Students will work on individual and team projects that involve analysis and production of scientific and technical writing.

ENG 452 - Medieval British Literature (3 credits)

Paul A. Broyles

Today, medieval Britain looms large in popular culture because of hit shows like Game of Thrones. But in the Middle Ages, Britain was just “an island at the edge of the world,” as one medieval English author put it, and English a language that seemed unsuited for literary writing. This course explores the literature of medieval Britain (excluding Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales), asking how medieval writers conceived of themselves and their relationship to a much larger world. We will see authors create new forms of writing in the face of major social and linguistic transformations, and examine how they respond to other languages and literary, cultural, and religious traditions. We will let early literature complicate our thinking about topics like race, sexuality, and nation, and consider how the idea of the Middle Ages is used and abused in the present day. Texts include romances about knights and magic like Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and Sir Orfeo (a medieval reimagining of Orpheus's journey to the underworld); dream visions such Piers Plowman—an allegorical exploration of religion and social justice—and work by Chaucer; visionary and mystical writing including Margery Kempe’s spiritual autobiography; and the fake and fantastical account of the world travels of John Mandeville. The course will offer ample practice in reading and interpreting Middle English, and no prior experience is required; works from other languages will be read in translation.

ENG 466 - Transatlantic Literatures (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

Literary exchanges between Atlantic Rim countries--European, North American and Caribbean--are almost as old as the decisive commercial exchanges that have done so much to transform the Old World and the New. While we’ll start off with the most famous author to analyze another country—Alexander de Tocqueville in Democracy in America (excerpts) and then we’ll take a look at parts of Charles Dickens’ 1842 travelogue, American Notes to get another European perspective on the American experience. We’ll then turn our attention to looking at pairs of writers who either literally reference one another, or by responding to similar social situations, exist in a state of dialogue with one another. For example, we’ll read Michael Herr’s amped-up reportage of American soldiers fighting in Vietnam as another version of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Conrad’s classic novella on the abuses of European colonialism in the Congo. We’ll next read another nightmarish text, T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Waste Land” as a reworking of American ragtime tunes and blues songs. We’ll read Eliot’s contemporary, William Carlos Williams, who championed American English as a resource for poetry, and analyze some of his most famous, iconoclastic poems  and then examine Charles Tomlinson’s poetry, the great English poet, whose poetic style and sensibility was own transformed by Williams’s example. In the post WWII years, we’ll see Elie Wiesel’s memoir of life in the concentration camps, Night, as undertaking a social analysis that shares much in common with William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. And we’ll finish the semester with poetry by examining the ways in which the English poet Simon Smith has adopted the breezy style of Frank O’Hara in Lunch Poems as a way of describing and evaluating the caffeinated, globalized, pop-culture saturated lives many of us in first-world countries are living nowadays. The last pairing of the semester brings in the Caribbean experience, or more accurately, the Caribbean-American experience, in the poetry of the Nobel prize-winning poet, Derek Walcott, and Claudia Rankine who in her provocative collage text, Citizen: An American Lyric, takes on in dramatic fashion the legacy of racism. The readings from the semester then will come from an interestingly diverse set of different authors and genres—essays, travelogues, songs, novels, novellas, memoirs, magazine articles and poetry.

ENG 476 - Southern Literature (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

Literary traditions of the Southeastern United States from colonization through the present, including study of such major writers as Byrd, Jefferson, Simms, Poe, Douglass, Twain, Chesnutt, Glasgow, Hurston, Tate, Wolfe, Faulkner, Warren, Wright, Welty, Williams, O'Conner, Percy, and Smith.

ENG 482 - Reading in the Digital Age (3 credits)

ENG 486 - Shakespeare, The Earlier Plays (3 credits)

ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will give special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems. Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision. The course continues to explore the themes, techniques and elements of poetry writing. We will read single collections of contemporary poems by a number of recommended authors. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and will create a handmade broadside. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works will be reviewed. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet and participate in a class poetry reading. The course stresses reading as a writer and provides a foundation from which students can pursue further studies in poetry writing.

ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

ENG 492 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

Superheroes, Soldiers, Cowboys, Gangsters

This course will explore four popular American genres at a key moment in their history. All of these genres feature male protagonists, whose central actions in each film are defined by violence. Whether on horseback, in a 1928 Cadillac sedan, in the trenches, or flying through the air, these male characters and their popularity as film subjects have much to teach us about film as well as cultural history. How do these films imagine masculinity and men’s roles in American culture? Are these figures consistently victorious or do they fail in ways that are instructive? Does the strength or vulnerability of these films’ protagonists allow us to better understand the historical moments in which they were made? Why are genre films like the gangster film, western, war film, and superhero film so tremendously popular at some points in film history, and virtually nonexistent in others? This course will explore these topics and much more!

 

Andrew Robert Johnston

Media F/X: Digital Cinema, Animation, & Special Effects

This course will explore the history, theory, and aesthetics of contemporary digital media technology, with an emphasis on animation and special effects. Recent cinema has become more reliant on special effects and though these have been utilized since the medium's origins, the development and use of CGI algorithms have changed film's contours along with media like video games and animation. We will examine the historical creation and rise of CGI that then winds through a broader media landscape, paying attention to creative applications, expressive potentialities, and the interaction of spectacle and narrative that frame special effects and animation. The class will engage with Star Wars in the 1970s to its contemporary incarnations and with home video play of Atari 2400 games in the 1970s to Google's Deep Mind AI playing them today.

 

500-level Courses


ENG 505 - Writing Program Administration: Theory, Practice, and Research (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

Almost everyone who earns a post-graduate degree in writing or communication studies and pursues a career in higher education will at some point be involved in the administration of a writing program, writing center, or writing- or communication-across-the-curriculum effort, and many will become its director. Yet graduate curricula seldom focus on the complex theoretical, pedagogical, political, and managerial dimensions of such work, leaving the new WPA or future writing department chair at the mercy of inherited practice—and much trial and error.

This course is designed to focus on current theories, research, and practices of writing program administration, including curricular design and assessment, faculty development, assessment of student achievement, budget oversight, the politics of administration in higher education, and historical studies of writing program administration. The course is designed for all interested MA and PhD students, but will be particularly valuable for those considering administrative work in first-year writing programs, writing centers, or WAC/CAC programs at a range of institutions (community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and large research universities). Those with other higher-education interests may also find the administrative focus useful for career enhancement and job preparation.

Note: This course was originally listed as ENG 583/798, but it has been approved as a permanent course offering and the number has changed to 505. This will not affect registration.

ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

English 511 provides a broad survey of the histories and philosophies of composition studies and composition research. This seminar is a prerequisite for students who wish to teach composition at North Carolina State University. English 511 will help students become familiar with the theories and voices which frame composition studies; understand the development of composition as a research site; become acquainted with the major resources in the field, in order to conduct independent exploration; assemble professional-level materials and apply reading knowledge so as to join disciplinary discussions; and develop frames for the evaluation of sound, ethical research in writing studies.

ENG 515 - Rhetoric Of Science and Technology (3 credits)

ENG 519 - Online Information Design and Evaluation (3 credits)

Douglas M. Walls PhD

This course will prepare students for thinking and designing creatively in a world where technical communicators must deal with decentralized expertise and information overload. In classical rhetorical thinking, there is a defined “context” from which appropriate decisions are made. Decisions about what or how to convey information are determined by that decorum. Contemporary, our contexts constantly shift depending on how information interacts with what we know already and what we can observe in our environment. We draw on networked information to make sense of what we know about our environment, culture/social, and physical context to make moment to moment decisions like which laptop to buy, where to eat tonight if you really want Mexican food, or which gate to go to to catch your plane. How and when information is organized and comes to us shapes our sense of our context and, thus, the possibilities of our own, or a client’s, actions.

In this course, we will be approaching an understanding of context primarily from two forms of inquiry: text mining and information architecture.

Finding context: Text Mining
This course will cover the major techniques for mining and analyzing text data to discover interesting patterns, extract useful knowledge, and support decision making, with approaches that can be generally applied to arbitrary natural language text data with no or minimum human effort. Ie will be experimenting with ways of reading large amounts of online texts through machine analysis. In other words, how can you read 30,000 forum posts to understand how your open source community make sense of your product? You’ll learn how.

Supporting context: Information Architecture
In this course, students will learn the foundational concepts and strategies used to create information structures for others to use. You will read, write, and share their writing on IA concepts as the primary course activity. We will also engage in hands-on activities to aid our thinking. IA is fundamentally a domain of inquiry or a way of being and thinking about information. Therefore, the goal of the course is to prepare students to design inquiry about the best ways to make IA decisions in a given context.

ENG 522 - Writing in Nonacademic Settings (3 credits)

Susan M Katz

Directed work experience for English Department graduate students including work-site mentoring and evaluation and concurrent academic assignments. Academic component includes reading and discussing articles relevant to the day-to-day practice of writing in nonacademic settings and completion of a report detailing the internship experience. Graduate Standing in an English Department graduate program required. Modest liability insurance fee required. Students must provide their own transportation to the practicum site.

ENG 523 - Language Variation Research Seminar (3 credits)

ENG 530 - 17th-Century English Literature (3 credits)

Margaret Simon

Taking as its tagline the title from Robert Herrick’s 1647 poetic manifesto, “Delight in Disorder,” this course will explore the possibilities revolution and unrest opened for writers as they experimented with genres, shaped their work to fit certain political alliances, continued to pursue patronage while also carving out a more public space for authorship, and themselves theorized on the role of government and religion in public and private life. We will give particular attention to women authors first publishing in this century. 

ENG 536 - Research Methods in Phonology (3 credits)

This course explores laboratory and computational tools for investigating linguistic sound systems. By the end of the semester, students should (1) understand some of the main issues of modern phonological theory, including phonological typology and the concept of phonetic naturalness, (2) know how to use laboratory techniques for studying language and speech, such as acoustic analysis of speech corpora, ultrasound imaging of the tongue, electroglottography, aerodynamic measurement, and perception experiments, and (3) have working knowledge of computational tools involved in collecting and analyzing phonetic data, including phonological databases, forced alignment, scripting in Praat, Python, R, and/or Matlab, and some Linux commands.

ENG 539 - Seminar In World Literature (3 credits)

James M. Grimwood

As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams he found himself transformed in his bed into a gigantic insect.

Traditions of metamorphosis from Homer and Ovid to the Incredible Hulk and Spider Man, with examples from non-Western as well as—primarily—Western cultures. Treatment of the history of literary representations of change. Attention to metamorphic operations generally, including especially metaphor and other rhetorical figures, translation, and cross-media adaptation. Readings expected in Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Dante’s The Inferno, Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Chesnutt’s The Conjure Woman, Kafka’s “The Metamorphosis,” etc. Strong attention to metamorphic and metaphorical phenomena in the visual arts. Metamorphosis and metaphor as foundational concepts in a variety of academic disciplines (including education, fine arts, humanities, social sciences, physical and biological sciences, mathematics, and applied science).

ENG 543 - Introduction to Digital Humanities (3 credits)

Paul Camm Fyfe

This course invites students of all technical abilities to explore the ongoing digital transformation of resources, tools, and methods in the humanities. As an introduction, this course is a gateway into a variety of representative subfields in digital humanities. It is designed to generate curiosity about how this emerging arena of scholarly activity might intersect with students’ own disciplines, research interests, and pedagogies. It goals are to: 1) provide a working knowledge of digital humanities' development from the history of new media and humanities computing; 2) invite students into debates and outlooks for the digital humanities as they structure contemporary academic discourse; and 3) provide students hands-on experience collaborating on, creating, and critiquing digital humanities projects.

ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study the African American literary tradition and experience from the perspective of African American writers. Designed to familiarize students with the study of literature at a progressive level, this course is a reading intense exercise in “close,” critical reading. During the course of the semester, we will explore the development of our country’s literature over the last half century, from the black perspective.  

With the help of several seminal texts, including short stories and novels, we will conduct a survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture as we understand it, with an emphasis on fiction (drama and poetry) from, roughly, World War II to the present. As literary critics and social historians, we will attempt to show how these texts in turn define America as we see it, think it, and/or hope it to be. Sometimes this conception is in correlation with that of the dominant culture; often, however, we will see, it is at odds with it.  This duality becomes, very much, the basis for African American consciousness in the twentieth century, something Du Bois labels a pervasive sense of “two-ness.” In addition, we will see how our chosen artists negotiate history, and how the past is ever-present in the African American text. 

ENG 554 - Contemporary Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

ENG 555 - American Romantic Period (3 credits)

Anne Baker

This course will examine major literary works and movements in the United States from 1820 to 1860. We will focus on the relationship between cultural contexts (nationalism, Westward expansion, Transcendentalism, industrialization, debates over slavery, etc.) and the remarkable formal and stylistic innovation that characterized this period in American literary history. Authors may include Melville, Hawthorne, Douglass, Stowe, Emerson,  Thoreau, and Whitman. Seminar format. Requirements: active participation, an oral presentation, and a research paper.

ENG 582 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

Sharon M. Setzer

Nineteenth-Century British Poetry and the Visual Arts

In this course, we will examine how poetry and works of visual art inspire, complement, popularize, idealize, critique, and / or interpret each other. Authors studied include Mary Robinson, Wordsworth, Byron, P. B. Shelley, Keats, Felicia Hemans, Tennyson, Robert Browning, Christina Rossetti, D.G. Rossetti, and Michael Field. Course requirements include mid-term and final exams, oral reports, and a 12-15 page research paper.

 

Jon F Thompson

Transatlantic Literature: Transatlantic Exchanges

Literary exchanges between Atlantic Rim countries--European, North American and Caribbean--are almost as old as the decisive commercial exchanges that have done so much to transform the Old World and the New. We’ll start off with the most famous author to analyze another country—Alexander de Tocqueville in Democracy in America (excerpts) and then we’ll take a look at parts of Charles Dickens’ 1842 travelogue, American Notes to get another European perspective on the American experience. We’ll then turn our attention to looking at pairs of writers who either literally reference one another, or by responding to similar social situations, exist in a state of dialogue with one another. For example, we’ll read Michael Herr’s amped-up reportage of American soldiers fighting in Vietnam as another version of Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Conrad’s classic novella on the abuses of European colonialism in the Congo. We’ll next read another nightmarish text, T.S. Eliot’s poem “The Waste Land” as a reworking of American ragtime tunes and blues songs. We’ll read Eliot’s contemporary, William Carlos Williams, who championed American English as a resource for poetry, in tandem with Charles Tomlinson’s poetry, the great English poet, whose poetry was own transformed by Williams’s example. In the post WWII years, we’ll see Elie Wiesel’s memoir of life in the concentration camps, Night, as undertaking a social analysis that has much in common with William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. And we’ll finish the semester with poetry by examining the ways in which the English poet Simon Smith has adopted the breezy style of Frank O’Hara in Lunch Poems as a way of describing--and evaluating--the caffeinated, globalized, pop-culture saturated lives many in first-world countries are living nowadays. The last pairing of the semester brings in the Caribbean experience, or more accurately, the Caribbean-American experience, in the poetry of the Nobel prize-winning poet, Derek Walcott, and Claudia Rankine who in her provocative collage text, Citizen: An American Lyric, takes on in dramatic fashion the legacy of racism. The readings from the semester then will come from a diverse set of genres (and authors)—essays, travelogues, songs, novels, novellas, memoirs, magazine articles and poetry. This course can be applied to any of these categories in the MA program: American Lit, Late British Lit, World Lit.

ENG 583 - Studies In Rhetoric and Writing (3 credits)

Huiling Ding

Intercultural professional and technical communication

Eng 583 investigates how professional writing and technical communication operate in an international context. It explores the cultural, educational, and practical impacts of information technologies, digital media, and multimodal forms of communication on the way professionals communicate about their work to subject matter experts, colleagues, users, and the general public. Students will learn the latest trends in international professional and technical communication, produce professional information products for global users, and conduct practical research on such intercultural practices. A wide range of topics will be covered in the course, which include comparative and contrastive rhetoric, world Englishes, second language writing, simplified English, global English, technical English, globalization and its impacts, world risk society, internationalization and localization, virtual teams, translation, cross-cultural design, global UX, and global content strategy.

 

ENG 585 - Studies In Film (3 credits)

Devin A. Orgeron PhD

The South is constantly undergoing a process of redefinition.  Occasionally, the region has had a hand in these efforts.  This class will closely examine the ways in which Southern media (film, television, radio, print, photographic, and electronic) have shaped our collective, constantly shifting notion of “The South.”  We will begin by looking at some key representations of the region from the “outside.”  Most of the semester, however, will be spent exploring attempts from within to “correct,” question, or (in some instances) reify this representation. Though students are expected to come to the class with a variety of theoretical and historical “ways in,” our reading will gravitate around issues of realism, regional mythologies, and the politics of media representation.  A series of archival, historical, and media-production site visits (including a visit to a local public-access TV Station) will get students digging for and exploring the landscape of media evidence and expert guests will fill in the historical and technological  gaps. As the course progresses, our focus will tighten around North Carolina, The Triangle, and Raleigh. Student projects will focus on some aspect of this long and living history and some students will, themselves, create and publish media projects. NOTE: there are no pre-requisites for this course and students needn’t be versed in film / media history or theory.  This class will have material that rhetoricians, linguists, creative writers, and students of media and literature can dig into.

ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Belle McQuaide Boggs

A writing workshop exclusively for the graduate students in the Master of Fine Arts program. Expect to produce (at least) three fiction submissions over the course of term.

ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

This course offers individual practice in the craft of poetry.  Each student will be asked to write a minimum of 150 lines of poetry in addition to several formal exercises such as translating a poem from a foreign language or writing a poem in an arbitrarily chosen form.  Class meetings will be devoted to student work as well as to essays on craft and discussions on published poetry. 589 is the graduate course intended for MFA students or others advanced enough in their poetry. Admission is by portfolio or by MFA poetry program status; anyone not in the MFA poetry program should talk to me about enrolling in the class.

ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

ENG 592 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Marsha Gabrielle Gordon PhD

THIS IS A DUAL LEVEL MA COURSE THAT IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO MA STUDENTS IN THE FILM CONCENTRATION. ENROLLMENT BY PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR.

Superheroes, Soldiers, Cowboys, Gangsters

This course will explore four popular American genres at a key moment in their history. All of these genres feature male protagonists, whose central actions in each film are defined by violence. Whether on horseback, in a 1928 Cadillac sedan, in the trenches, or flying through the air, these male characters and their popularity as film subjects have much to teach us about film as well as cultural history. How do these films imagine masculinity and men’s roles in American culture? Are these figures consistently victorious or do they fail in ways that are instructive? Does the strength or vulnerability of these films’ protagonists allow us to better understand the historical moments in which they were made? Why are genre films like the gangster film, western, war film, and superhero film so tremendously popular at some points in film history, and virtually nonexistent in others? This course will explore these topics and much more!

MA English-Film Graduate students enrolled in the course will have additional reading, research, and writing requirements beyond those required at the 400-level.

 

Andrew Robert Johnston
Media F/X: Digital Cinema, Animation, & Special Effects
 
This course will explore the history, theory, and aesthetics of contemporary digital media technology, with an emphasis on animation and special effects. Recent cinema has become more reliant on special effects and though these have been utilized since the medium's origins, the development and use of CGI algorithms have changed film's contours along with media like video games and animation. We will examine the historical creation and rise of CGI that then winds through a broader media landscape, paying attention to creative applications, expressive potentialities, and the interaction of spectacle and narrative that frame special effects and animation. The class will engage with Star Wars in the 1970s to its contemporary incarnations and with home video play of Atari 2400 games in the 1970s to Google's Deep Mind AI playing them today.

600-level Courses


ENG 675 - Projects in Technical Communication (3 credits)

ENG 675 Projects in Technical Communication is a 3-credit "capstone course" for the MS Program in Technical Communication, taken as close as possible to the last semester of the student’s curriculum, in lieu of a thesis. You are eligible to enroll only if you are nearing the end of your coursework in the MS Program; you need previous coursework to develop a sustained, more complex project and to defend your projects before the MS faculty. Your projects are the subject matter of this course. Our class sessions will be conducted as seminars, with discussion centering on the progress and problems of researching, designing, developing, and defending a larger project, and on helping each other work within established deadlines and different fields. Your project will provide you with an opportunity to gain deeper insight into your field, and to acquire greater ability to work in the profession of technical communication.

ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

ENG 685 - Master's Supervised Teaching (1-3 credits)

ENG 688 - Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration (1 credit)

700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3 credits)

CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 790 - Scholarly and Professional Paths in Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Research (3 credits)

CRD 791 - Special Topics in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media (3 credits)

This seminar will explore theories of animation and media in moving image culture. While animation is many times considered children’s entertainment, this course situates it as the technical coincidence of life and movement and examines its relation to the nature of different media and their embedded landscapes. Though cinema is one form we will study, it will be placed in a long history of moving images that we will interrogate along with the roles different techniques and technologies play in that history’s formation. The course will begin with an examination of nineteenth century optical devices like zoetropes and phenakistoscopes and then study handmade and industrial animation practices before focusing on digital animation, effects technology, and animation's relationship with video games. Particular attention will be paid to the role of movement in media aesthetics and the sense of vitality objects and figures take on in animation. How is life attributed to this illusion of movement? How is the threshold between the animate and inanimate used to define our understandings of media and mediation?

800-level Courses


CRD 885 - Doctoral Supervised Teaching (1-3 credits)

CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

HON 294 - Honors Special Topics-Philosophy or Religion (3 credits)

HON 296 - Honors Special Topics-Science, Technology, Society-H&SS Perspective (3 credits)

HON 298 - Honors Research/Independent Study (1-3 credits)

300-level Courses


HON 395 - Honors Cooperative Education (3 credits)

HON 397 - Honors Extension and Engagement (1-6 credits)

400-level Courses


HON 498 - Honors Research/Creative Project 1 (3 credits)

HON 499 - Honors Research/Creative Project 2 (3 credits)