Spring 2019 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

200-level Courses


ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

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ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

Christa Williams Gala

A nuts-and-bolts class for editing different kinds of writing in the workplace--and your own. Master the mechanics of grammar, punctuation and AP Style, and implement those skills to make copy more concise and interesting. We'll also cover headline writing and the telltale signs of biased writing, libel and fake news. Learn how to fact-check, edit and rework copy with a discerning eye.

ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

“Traditional Non-Western Literature”

Readings in traditional literature, in translation, from Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas.  Students will be introduced to the origins and flourishing of these oldest cultures through the oral and written stories, poems, essays and plays that have become the defining works of these societies.  At the same time we will look at the geographical, historical, and philosophical contexts from which these texts arise. 

ENG 221 - Literature of the Western World I (3 credits)

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ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 224 - Contemporary World Literature II (3 credits)

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ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD

This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

Antony Howard Harrison

Imagining the ‘Other’ in Important Works of British Literature

This course is designed to introduce students to works of significant, influential British authors writing in all literary genres from about 1600 to 2000 (William Shakespeare to Zadie Smith). The works read and discussed are especially concerned with questions of “otherness” and with disrupting readers’ assumptions and preconceptions about many issues, including gender, race, sexuality, science, and religion. The class will discuss one play, one short work of nonfiction prose, a number of poems (one of them an epic), two novels, and a novella—a substantial amount of reading. We analyze these works in detail, as well as their important social, historical, political, and cultural contexts.

ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 255 - Beyond Britain: Literature from Colonies of the British Empire (3 credits)

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ENG 260 - Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality (3 credits)

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ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

James Robert Knowles

This course is an introduction to English literature from early Anglo-Saxon writings to the late seventeenth century. We will read a selection of major writers and texts from the Old English period, the Anglo-Norman period (Marie de France), the Middle English period (Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe), the English Renaissance (Wyatt, Marlowe, Shakespeare), and the seventeenth century (the “metaphysical” poets), finishing in the 1660s with John Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost. Our approach to reading and discussing these texts will be twofold. First, the aesthetic approach to reading literature asks us to recognize these poems and plays as works of art with transhistorical value and enduring appeal. Secondly, the historical approach to reading literature asks us to understand the same texts as cultural objects which are deeply embedded in the times, places, and circumstances of their creation. Part of our task will be to recognize how and when our own twenty-first-century moral and aesthetic impulses (what we find beautiful or moving or gross) diverge from those of the writers we are studying. In other words, the aesthetic and the historical approaches to reading literature may sometimes be at odds with one another. Our job as readers is to notice and to describe such disconnections when they occur. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts on their own terms and to situate texts within their original cultural contexts.

ENG 262 - English Literature II (3 credits)

Anna Gibson

This survey of English literature begins in the 1660s and brings us to the 20th century, taking us on a journey through the poetry, fiction, drama, and prose of major British writers. Along the way we will focus our attention on four literary movements/periods: Romanticism, the Victorian era, modernism, and post-modernism. Studying works of literature in the context of these movements will allow us to listen to the writers’ conversations and disagreements across and within these literary categories and to situate these conversations within the changing landscape of British cultural history. How did literary texts respond to massive social changes such as industrialization, a growing population, the rise of cities, shifting gender roles and social classes, and two world wars? And how did these texts shape people’s experiences of such changes? How did writers across this time period offer new ways of thinking about the relationship between self and world? We will ask these questions as we read works by such central writers as Dryden, Pope, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Austen, Brontë, Rossetti, Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Rhys.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

This course focuses on American literature from the Civil War to the present, with particular attention to the construction of, and contests around, race, class, gender, sexuality, and aspects of national identity. Surveying this field in a comprehensive way in one semester is an impossible task, of course, given the rich range of literatures written in the United States in the last century and a half. So this course makes this difficulty its subject matter by interrogating the contested ways that ideas of “American-ness” or categories of “American” have been constructed by various writers working and living in the United States. In particular, we will focus on several dominant, and sometimes paradoxical, ways of understanding what makes American literature distinctly “American.” American literature seems to reproduce an American culture that has a particular identity distinct from other global cultures. But, at the same time, the purportedly democratic nature of our culture means that American literature produces multiple, heterogeneous cultures that tug at the notion of an identifiable shared, singular “Americanness.” Our time during the semester will focus on the literary movements of late Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism with these challenges in mind, with attention to the role that race, class, gender, and national identity play.

ENG 267 - LGBTQI Literature in the U.S. (3 credits)

Chronological survey of works of literature by and about gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex communities in the U.S. Primary texts will be considered in historical, political, and literary contexts. Brief consideration of early works from colonial period and 19th century with primary focus on 20th and 21st century texts.

ENG 275 - Literature and War (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

Literature and War asks how people speak of, reflect on and tell stories about war in the context of history and the evolving technology of armed conflict. Issues to be addressed will include the nature and purpose of war, the role of weaponry in dictating battle, the question of a just war, the theory of deterrence, and an examination of the soldier. These topics will be approached from multiple perspectives: literary, historical, technological, psychological, social, and tactical. (Fulfills GEP Humanities requirement, Global Knowledge co req, and HSS Lit 1 or Lit 2 requirement.)

ENG 281 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction (3 credits)

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ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

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ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

Belle McQuaide Boggs

This class provides an introduction to the basic elements and principles of three genres of creative writing: creative nonfiction, poetry, and fiction.

ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

Shervon Jude Cassim

This course is designed to teach the beginning writer how to write short fiction. Working under the hypothesis that the purpose of writing a short story is to manipulate the reader into seeing the world in a particular way, we will study the short story as a “device” that is constructed to accomplish that purpose.  Most of our in-class time will be spent on discussion—of published short stories, craft, and of your own short-story manuscripts. You will be using everything you learn in your own writing. By the end of the semester, you will know how to think like a writer of good short fiction and be able to take a problem-solving approach to crafting effective short fiction. You will know how to craft an effective short story, and you will have practice critiquing (constructively) your own writing and that of your classmates.

ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

T.J. Gerard Volgare Jr

Students learn various approaches to interpreting and writing about Film Form, Style, and Meaning. Students will practice thoughtfully responding to the ways a film is constructed, the way it resonates with audiences, and the way it reflects a political and social order. Students will read and write film reviews, screening reports, Theoretical, and Comparative Essays on films screened in class. By way of Film screenings, readings of professional criticism, discussions on assigned readings, and in-class writing workshops, students will develop a writing portfolio of well-informed film criticism.

300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

Leila S May

In this course, we will approach a number of overlapping issues and concerns affecting women through a broad spectrum of nineteenth- and twentieth-century works by female writers.  We will engage in a number of simultaneous activities: looking at the ways in which various women writers of diverse ethnicities have rejected traditional narratives, such as the courtship plot and kitchen concerns, creating alternative stories based on other types of relationships and other interests; examining the ways in which "madness" gets represented in a society that marginalizes both fantasy and "the feminine,and apotheosizes reason; studying fictions of female development (the female Bildungsroman), and speculating on the differences between female and male "Bildung”; interrogating traditional notions of gender differences; discussing the meaning of the establishment of a tradition of "women's writing":  how, for example, do women writers build upon—or challenge—the works of their literary "mothers"?  Authors will include Charlotte Brontë, Sandra Cisneros, Louise Erdrich, Zora Neale Hurston, Barbara Kingsolver, Maxine Hong Kingston, Toni Morrison, Alice Munro, Jean Rhys, and Leslie Marmon Silko.

ENG 314 - Technical Document Design and Editing (3 credits)

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ENG 316 - Introduction to News and Article Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

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ENG 325 - Spoken and Written Traditions of American English Dialects (3 credits)

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ENG 326 - History of the English Language (3 credits)

Prerequisite: ENG 101
Development of the English language from its Indo-European origins to the present. Emphasis on historical and comparative linguistic methodology and on changes in sound, syntax, and meaning.

ENG 327 - Language and Gender (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 329 - Language and Globalization (3 credits)

Agnes Bolonyai PhD

This course is about language, identity and culture in globalization. It is about how contemporary processes of mobility, migration and the global circulation of information, resources, texts, ideologies and images impact people, places, and practices. The course offers an introduction to the sociolinguistics of globalization and highlights the role that language, discourse and interaction play in the profound changes that people are experiencing world-wide.  Focusing on how people use language ‘on-the-move’ and across geographic, cultural and social boundaries, we explore the interplay between global flows and local contexts and the consequences of intense contact with linguistic difference and cultural otherness for our ways of speaking, thinking, and being. We examine in particular how traditional forms of communication and cultural belonging are destabilized by processes of globalization, resulting in new, creative and increasingly complex, ‘superdiverse’ linguistic practices within the U.S.  We will also examine cultures outside the U.S. We problematize the notion of identity as fixed in time and space and focus on how identities, always in motion, are discursively constructed, resisted and resignified in socially embedded but locally situated practices.  You will have the opportunity to analyze linguistic and semiotic practices from a diverse range of (trans)national and semiotic contexts (e.g., youth language and identities; multilingual hip-hop; social media and digital communication; multilingual signs in urban spaces), and participate in investigative activities.

Our goal is to uncover the divergent cultural norms, values, and ideologies that inform language use in globalization, the cultural meanings and identities translocal practices signify in local spaces and communities, and the larger socio-historical context and power structure of which they are part. Critically examining language diversification and use provides a window into our rapidly globalizing world, helping us to make sense of it, and to make ourselves at home across borders and boundaries.

ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

Susan Jenny Emshwiller

Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, in-class written explorations of specific concepts, and sharing of students’ work we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. Students will learn about structure, characterization, creating dynamic dialogue, subtext, subplots, theme, exposition, etc. utilizing established screenplay formats. The course will involve studying great films and scripts, participating in critiques, and the writing and revising of original material. Over the course, students will write scenes focusing on specific screenwriting elements, and share and critique these pieces. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and will have a work-in-progress screenplay.

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 341 - Literature and Science (3 credits)

Anna Gibson

We are used to thinking about science and literature as two separate “cultures” with contrasting approaches to the central questions of human existence. But was it always this way? And what happens when we put literature and science into conversation with one another? This will be our task this semester as we examine the imaginative potentials, social repercussions, and interdisciplinary mixing of literature and science from the sixteenth century to the present. Our focus will be the period between the early nineteenth century, when we begin to see the establishment of scientific disciplines, and the mid-twentieth century, when English physicist and novelist C.P. Snow famously lamented the dangerous split between science and literary life. In this class we will read primary sources from scientific writers alongside literary texts, examining how different historical contexts produce new connections between the literary and the scientific disciplines. Our scientific readings may draw from natural history and biology, geology, botany, physics, chemistry, psychology, and even some Victorian “pseudo-sciences” like phrenology and mesmerism, but we will focus much of our attention on the development of a scientific theory that continues to spark debate today: evolution. Authors may include Margaret Cavendish, Mary Shelley, Alfred Tennyson, Charles Darwin, George Eliot, Ada Lovelace, H.G. Wells, Francis Galton, Aldous Huxley, and Ted Chiang. No prior scientific/technical knowledge is required.

ENG 350 - Professional Internships (3 credits)

Douglas M. Walls

Directed work experience for CHASS majors including work-site mentoring and evaluation. The goal for the course is to help students with career foundations as creative class professionals. Additionally, students will be provided an important introduction to the role that rhetorical thinking plays in the labor of groups of people like organizations or communities and how to think about building and maintaining their own careers as symbolic-analytic workers who identify and solve problems through digitally mediated writing. Department supervision includes course work directed toward designing employment application materials, developing a portfolio of professional work, considering a variety of career options, and reading literature on workplace socialization. Students are asked to provide their own internship opportunities as well as providing their own transportation to the internship site.

Visit the English Department Internship Program website for more information.

ENG 372 - American Poetry, Twentieth Century and Beyond (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 374 - History of Film From 1940 (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

This course is the second in a two part series in film history. The first part of the series, ENG 364 (History of Film to 1940) explores the international history of cinema from its inception to the beginning of the sound era in the late 1920s and 1930s. This course, Film History From 1940 to the Present, is structured as a survey class covering international film movements and styles from the late 1930s, early 1940s to the present. We will look at the tensions and confluences between discourses of aesthetics and film form, nationalism, third world and postcolonial critique, and identity politics by considering films from diverse cultural and national contexts, including, among others,  Italian, British, French, Iranian, Swedish, South Korean, Japanese, Romanian, Canadian and International co-productions as well as Hollywood and American Independent feature films. We will also consider the politics of modes of representation in film (i.e., how do films represent history and memory, racial, national, cultural or gender identity, and what are the political implications of those representations?). Filmmakers to be considered include Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, Stanley Kubrick, Park Jon-wook, Milos Forman, Stephen Spielberg, Vera Chytilová, Woody Allen, Abbas Kiarostami, Darren Aronofsky, Cristian Mungiu, Harmony Korine, Roman Polanski, Lynn Shelton, Asghar Farhadi, Paul Verhoeven, Kelly Reichardt, Kathryn Bigelow, and others.

ENG 375 - African American Cinema (3 credits)

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ENG 376 - Science Fiction (3 credits)

Thomas P. Phillips

This section of Eng 376 examines the science fiction genre from the general standpoint of its aesthetic and thematic development as aligned with historical contexts, the latter being invariably connected to technological advances. Specifically, it will follow the genre’s ongoing fascination for and insights into the category of the human.

Assessment: class participation, two formal essays, and two exams.

ENG 377 - Fantasy (3 credits)

Brian Blackley

Representative works in the genre of fantasy from Beowulf to Bilbo Baggins. Primary focus on the heroic quest, including aspects such as the search for revelation/transformation, the demands of leadership, the value of supporting figures (the wise old man, the good mother, the helper), and the supernatural/magical as key to success in the supreme ordeal. Prior reading of works by J. R. R. Tolkien and J. K. Rowling recommended but not required. There will be two tests, a presentation, and an essay.

ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 393 - Studies in Literary Genre (3 credits)

Sujata Sudhakar Mody

Section 1- Drama in Modern India 

This course provides a focused treatment of drama in modern India as it has evolved since the late 19th century. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre, especially as an intricate weave of modern vernacular traditions with both classical Sanskrit and western dramatic traditions. After a brief introduction to the classical Sanskrit tradition as well as pre-colonial folk and devotional theater traditions, which remained central points of reference through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will move on to the main focus of the course, colonial and post-colonial theater in India. All readings are available in English translation.

 

Section 3 - Modern Hindi-Urdu Short Story

This course provides a focused treatment of the modern short story in Hindi/Urdu. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre from the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern genre in the colonial and nationalist periods in South Asian literary history; students will also be introduced to some writing from India and Pakistan in the post-Independence era. All readings are available in English translation.

ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Nilakshi Phukan

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to the availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

Mai Nou Xiong

Digital Witnessing & Civic Media

This course introduces students to case studies in which media technologies position users as witnesses to the abuses of power and or situations that would otherwise remain unknown. In examining digital storytelling practices and media art projects, students can better understand the influence of emerging technologies on rhetorical theory and communicative practices. Students are encouraged to explore a case study of their choice with greater intensity for their final project. Additionally, students are responsible for a collaborative project in which they are encouraged to use digital rhetoric and media to focus attention to an immediate cause within their chosen communities. Instruction will include some consultation from the Makerspace and Digital Media Librarians on design, making (planning, tool and medium selection, drafting, composing, revising, and peer critique), and audience. Furthermore, students will engage discussions concerning what is our obligation to the things we are witnesses to, and what is our relationship to the communities that we are digital witnesses of? Hopefully, this contributes to the larger question of how might digital media be a civic media that shapes the citizenry.

Laura Roberts

Popularizing Science in Digital Media

This course seeks to rhetorically analyze the role that digital media enacts in the communication of science among popular and technical audiences, and ultimately, help students become critical consumers and creators of popular media. Students will examine a variety of digital genres and platforms, such as games, movies, and social media to critically analyze how science is diffused to the populace, paying careful attention to rhetorical concepts of audience, argumentation, genre, and access. Students will evaluate these tools for dissemination in order to construct popularizations that reach and interact with various audiences. As a final project, students will make a popular science piece using a medium of their choice. This final project could serve as a portfolio piece for undergraduate students in the Language, Writing, and Rhetoric concentration to demonstrate their proficiency in using digital media to communicate complex technical information to a public audience.

ENG 399 - Contemporary Literature (3 credits)

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400-level Courses


ENG 405 - Literature for Adolescents (3 credits)

This course covers the history, types, and characteristics of literature for adolescents, and emphasizes reading and analyzing the literature by exploring the themes, literary elements, challenges, and rationale for young adult literature. It addresses the ways in which this literature can be integrated and implemented in an English curriculum. Although the course is primarily designed for future and current high school English teachers, it can also be valuable for those working with adolescents in any capacity or for enhancing one's understanding of young adult literature past and present.

ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Paul Christopher Isom

The purpose of the course is to prepare the student for advanced reporting in print/broadcast media. Topics can include in-depth coverage of local, state, and national government; criminal justice and the courts; business and economics; science and health matters; coverage of education, science, religion and sports. This course will seek to enhance both the student’s knowledge of these topics and the student’s ability to successfully report on them.

ENG 422 - Writing Theory and the Writing Process (3 credits)

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ENG 426 - Analyzing Style (3 credits)

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ENG 430 - Advanced Screenwriting (3 credits)

William Wilton Barnhardt

Prerequisite: an A or B in ENG 330 or permission of the instructor

This is an advanced screenwriting course that aims toward the production of an competent professional full-length movie script (100 pages). It continues where the Introductory Screenwriting left off though the same issues of craft--cinematic thinking, structure, dialogue, plot and character development--are still vital to the project.  As important as one's own script, will be your helpfulness to your colleagues and the discussions in workshop.

ENG 448 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 451 - Chaucer (3 credits)

James Robert Knowles

Chaucer: the Canterbury Tales

This course is an introduction to one of the great literary works of the English Middle Ages, Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales. We will read a broad selection of the tales in their original language. We now call this language “Middle English,” but to Chaucer and his contemporaries it was just plain English, the language of everyday speech -- as opposed to the official French and Latin used by the government and the church. As such, our first task (an ongoing one) will be to learn to read and pronounce and understand Chaucer’s English. We will do this slowly, as a group, pausing as often as necessary to learn unfamiliar words and the historical and cultural contexts from which they derive their meanings. If you have never read Middle English before, do not fear. After a few weeks of practice you will be very comfortable with Chaucer’s language. We can then get on with the fun stuff: to read the poetry with a critical eye and ear; to be amazed at the sheer scope and audacity of Chaucer’s poetic project; to be awestruck by his mastery of multiple forms and genres; to get his dirty jokes (there are lots of these); and finally to try to grasp what made Chaucer an important writer in his own time and why he remains a crucial figure for the study of English literature in the twenty-first century. Research projects will allow students to explore Chaucer’s many contexts (historical, social, political, literary, linguistic, codicological, etc.) and will introduce students to the long and diverse tradition of scholarship on the Tales. For English majors, the course fulfills requirements for British Literature (core); Ancient/Medieval (LLT concentration); and Author (co-req). GEP Humanities credit. 

ENG 487 - Shakespeare, The Later Plays (3 credits)

Christopher James Crosbie

Twisted Comedy: Shakespeare and the Absurd, Dark, and Joyous

In this class, we will read, watch, enjoy, and discuss the many forms of twisted comedy that permeate Shakespeare’s plays.  As a genre, comedy (so the conventional narrative goes) drives toward amicable resolution and the reaffirmation of the positive elements of human existence.  As with all generic classifications, however, this tells only part of the truth.  Shakespearean comedy, for example, overflows with disturbingly dark plotlines, ambiguous resolutions, and even hints of tragedy to come.  Measure for Measure takes as its central narrative the attempted sexual assault on a woman entering a convent.  All’s Well That Ends Well depicts a love story between a woman and man who will do everything possible to avoid her.  Both plays stage ‘bed tricks’ where lovers are duped into sleeping with someone they never intended to be with.  Plays such as Othello launch their tragic tales by staging, for a full half of a play, a narrative that is generically comedic.  And, at the end of Shakespeare’s career, the dramatist creates comedies that include, among other disturbing matters, slavery, the death of children, sex trafficking, dismemberment by a bear (!!), and unrepentant villains who conclude their plays just as murderous as when the stories began.  Do the dark elements of Shakespearean comedy trouble our notions of genre?  Do they sit in contradistinction to comedy as conventionally received?  Or are they in some fashion essential for constituting the positive vision of humanity we’ve come to expect when we hear the word “comedy?”  Through six plays, ample group discussion, and the comparative study of multiple film adaptations, this course will examine these and related questions.  Along the way, we’ll situate Shakespeare’s plays in his own culture and re-think their position in our own as well.

ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

John D Morillo

Representing Animals

How and why have people represented animals in words and images? How has it changed from the classical period to the present? What do different fields suggest can be known about animals, why does that knowledge matter, and to whom? Are they granted consciousness, ethical importance, spirit, or independent agency? Are they seen as more suitable a subject of knowledge for children or for adults? Do they have a place and stake in human politics, and if so, why? Readings will necessarily be selective rather than exhaustive, and will include examples from fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, and from English, American, and some other literatures in translation. As a course grounded in literature and taught by an English professor, the importance of how these fields write about their animal subjects and construct them rhetorically as objects of knowledge and interest will be central, but visual representations (film, video, TV, advertising) will complement the readings. Required Text: Kaloff, Linda and Amy Fitzgerald, eds. The Animals Reader: The Essential Classics and Contemporary Writings.

ENG 492 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

Contemporary European Cinema

The course will look at a broad selection of European films from approximately the last twenty-five years as a means of gaining insight into the notion of a “New Europe." The course will focus in particular on the following subjects: film and authorship; art cinema vs. popular/commercial cinema; the concept of "national" cinema in light of globalization and shifting demographics in Western and Eastern Europe; realism in the cinema; the representation of history, memory, and cultural identity in film; changes in the film industry and the regulation of that industry in Europe and internationally in the 21st century; gender roles and sexual identity. We will, in addition, consider a trend in contemporary European cinema, a wave of recent films (what have been referred to as the "Romanian New Wave" or the "Greek Weird Wave," to give a couple of examples of these new "waves" or trend/movements in contemporary European film culture) that explore–often in quite radical ways– the experiences of minority, refugee, marginalized, and migrant communities within the new Europe. Filmmakers to be considered include: Lars Von Trier, Yorgos Lanthimos, Lukas Moodysson, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, Catherine Breillat, Sylvain George, Agnès Varda, Stephen Frears, Maren Ade, Chantal Ackerman, ‎Abdellatif Kechiche‎; Thomas Vinterberg; Fatih Akin; Corneliu Porumboiu, Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne, Cristian Mungiu, Yorgos, Michael Haneke, and Paul Verhoeven, among others.

Runlei Zhai

Chinese Cinema

This course explores China through contemporary Chinese cinema, broadly defined to include films from Mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. The central idea is to use a selection of internationally acclaimed films to help students better understand contemporary Chinese culture, history, politics, and society.

There will be a focused study of one film each week. We will examine approximately twelve films by twelve different directors ranging from the 5th generation to the 6th generation and the dGeneration, from the Hong Kong New Waves to Taiwan New Cinema. Students are supposed to read the assignments BEFORE class discussion, which will focus on how cultural, social, and political factors are visualized in each film, how films and directors in different generations and regions influence and interact with each other, and how to understand and appreciate Chinese films in the global context.

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (1-6 credits)

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500-level Courses


ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

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ENG 513 - Empirical Research In Composition (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

This class offers an introduction to basic principles of research design and to a range of qualitative and quantitative methods used to study writing processes, products, and contexts. Recommended for students who have had at least one prior graduate course in composition or technical communication, the course examines the empirical methods cited in the professional literatures of these fields. The course is intended to help students (1) develop the basic understanding of research design needed for reading and evaluating published research in composition and related fields; and (2) assess the goals and limitations of various methods in order to select methods and designs appropriate to their own research questions. Coursework includes a series of data analysis projects and design critiques, a pilot study, and a formal proposal, including a review of prior research. Requirements will differ for master’s and doctoral students. Doctoral students should register for the affiliated ENG 798 section.

ENG 513 satisfies the following requirements in departmental programs:

  • M.A. Concentration in Composition & Rhetoric: Research Methods or Rhetoric/Composition elective.
  • M.S. Technical Communication: Theory and Methods elective.
  • Ph.D. Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media: Quantitative or Qualitative Methods option (depending on the focus of projects), or may be taken as an elective.

Students in other programs are welcome to join.

ENG 516 - Rhetorical Criticism: Theory and Practice (3 credits)

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ENG 518 - Publication Management for Technical Communicators (3 credits)

Advanced study of project and personnel management issues as they relate to technical communication. Includes such topics as scheduling, estimating, budgeting, usability testing, staffing, performance evaluation, motivation, subcontracting, and ethics. For students planning careers as technical communicators, or for others managing groups involved in information development.

ENG 519 - Online Information Design and Evaluation (3 credits)

Douglas M. Walls

This course will prepare students for thinking and designing creatively in a world where technical communicators must deal with decentralized expertise and information overload. In classical rhetorical thinking, there is a defined “context” from which appropriate decisions are made. Decisions about what or how to convey information are determined by that decorum. Contemporary, our contexts constantly shift depending on how information interacts with what we know already and what we can observe in our environment. We draw on networked information to make sense of what we know about our environment, culture/social, and physical context to make moment to moment decisions like which laptop to buy, where to eat tonight if you really want Mexican food, or which gate to go to to catch your plane. How and when information is organized and comes to us shapes our sense of our context and, thus, the possibilities of our own, or a client’s, actions.

In this course, we will be approaching an understanding of context primarily from two forms of inquiry: text mining and information architecture.

Finding context: Text Mining
This course will cover the major techniques for mining and analyzing text data to discover interesting patterns, extract useful knowledge, and support decision making, with approaches that can be generally applied to arbitrary natural language text data with no or minimum human effort. Ie will be experimenting with ways of reading large amounts of online texts through machine analysis. In other words, how can you read 30,000 forum posts to understand how your open source community make sense of your product? You’ll learn how.

Supporting context: Information Architecture
In this course, students will learn the foundational concepts and strategies used to create information structures for others to use. You will read, write, and share their writing on IA concepts as the primary course activity. We will also engage in hands-on activities to aid our thinking. IA is fundamentally a domain of inquiry or a way of being and thinking about information. Therefore, the goal of the course is to prepare students to design inquiry about the best ways to make IA decisions in a given context.

ENG 522 - Writing in Nonacademic Settings (3 credits)

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ENG 523 - Language Variation Research Seminar (3 credits)

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ENG 533 - Bilingualism and Language Contact (3 credits)

A comprehensive introduction to the study of bilingualism and language contact. We explore the most important and fascinating aspects of individual and societal bilingualism, focusing on both theoretical and practical issues. The goal of the course is to better understand the linguistic, cognitive, cultural, and socio-political dimensions of multilingualism and its role in our lives. Some of the questions we will ask include: How do people become bilingual? Is it harder for a child to learn two languages at once? Is the bilingual brain different from the monolingual brain? Why do bilinguals code-switch? What happens when one language encroaches on the other? Can language shift and loss be predicted? Does bilingualism threaten English in the U.S.? 

Additional topics to be covered include: migration, mobility and multilingualism ▪ language, ideology, and identity ▪ multilingual internet and social media ▪ linguistic landscapes in urban settings ▪ superdiverse hybridity: metrolingualism, polylingualism & translanguaging ▪ multilingualism in global marketing ▪ bilingual education.

ENG 561 - Milton (3 credits)

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ENG 564 - Victorian Novel (3 credits)

Leila S May

Angels, Odd and Other Women

This seminar is designed to introduce you to the study of the Victorian novel at the graduate level through reading novels by such authors as the Brontë sisters, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, M.E. Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Thomas Hardy, and Bram Stoker. One of the principal areas of focus will be on what was commonly termed "The Woman Question"—something that was, in fact, a series of probes, reactions and heated debates concerning the status of women that transfixed the era. We will look not only at the figure of the Victorian Angel in the House but, in particular, at various "odd" and "other" women, those who go beyond the straightforward models set out for them by the social, legal, medical and domestic ideologies of their day.

ENG 576 - 20TH-Century American Poetry (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

576 Course Description

Jon Thompson

From the early twentieth century until the present day, American poetry has widely been recognized as one the most innovative, revolutionary and transformative poetic traditions in world literature. This course will examine the innovative landscape that has been American poetry in the twentieth century by examining its most influential traditions and many of its writers: Imagism (William Carlos Williams/Ezra Pound), Modernism (Wallace Stevens/Marianne Moore) Objectivism (George Oppen), New York School (Frank O’Hara/James Schuyler/John Ashbery), Projectivism/Black Mountain (Charles Olson/Robert Creeley), Beat (Ginsberg) and LANGUAGE Poetry (Susan Howe). We will end by reading the poetry of three contemporary poets whose work draws on, and extends, these rich traditions: Geoffrey O’Brien, Joseph Massey and Harryette Mullen. Rather than use an anthology, we will mainly be reading collections of poems by these poets. Key questions for the course: What assumptions regarding the writer, the reader and the text get transformed by these various traditions? What is poetic value? How do these various traditions reference or represent the world? What resources do these traditions offer for contemporary poetry? What do these poems want to do? Short manifestos and critical essays will also be part of the reading. Requirements: a seminar paper, final exam and short analytical papers.

 

ENG 582 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

Contemporary Southern Novel

This course will examine some of the best contemporary southern novelists. Students will come to recognize the similarities as well as the differences in current southern novels. Students will engage in academic discussions of the novels, read, study, and present the findings from an academic article about an assigned book. They will also turn in a one-page response paper for each novel read. Students will write a paper on an approved topic that includes outside sources. 

Margaret Simon

Early Women Writers

“Any woman born with a great gift in the sixteenth century would certainly have gone crazed…. For it needs little skill in psychology to be sure that a highly gifted girl who had tried to use her gift for poetry would have been so thwarted and hindered by other people, so tortured and pulled asunder by her own contrary instincts, that she must have lost her health and sanity to a certainty.” Thankfully, Virginia Woolf’s hypothesis, in her 1929 classic “A Room of One’s Own,” is not born out by early literary history. But who were the earliest women writing original works in English? How did these texts circulate? What aspects of literary life were open to women in the pre-modern era? What particular literary strategies did women writers develop to navigate an intellectual world that often did not invite their contributions? Beginning with early mystics like Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich, and proceeding through the emergence of the professional woman writer across the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries (from Anne Lock to Mary Wroth to Aphra Behn), we’ll end in the late seventeenth century with the experimental science fiction of Margaret Cavendish. The course will likewise consider the development of contemporary scholarly approaches to early women’s writing.

ENG 584 - Studies In Linguistics (3 credits)

Walter A Wolfram

Topics in Sociolinguistics: Ethnolinguistic Variation

This seminar examines the nature of ethnolinguistic variation in the English-speaking diaspora, considering models for measuring and describing both ethnicity and language variation. Socioethnic variation in North America (e.g. African American English, Latino English, American Indian English, Jewish English), the Caribbean (e.g. Bahamas, Jamaica), Africa (Nigeria, Liberia), and Asia (Indian English, Hong Kong English) are examined. Students are expected to partiicpate actively in discussions and conduct an analysis and description of an ethnolinguistic variety or ethnolinguistic repertoire.

ENG 524 or ENG 525, or the approval of the instructor, is a prerequisite.

 

ENG 585 - Studies In Film (3 credits)

Andrew Robert Johnston

Animating Matter and Media

This seminar will explore the intersecting theories of animation and new materialism in media studies and moving image culture. While animation is many times considered children’s entertainment, this course situates it as the technical coincidence of life and movement and examines its relation to the nature of different media and their embedded landscapes. In a similar vein, new materialism as a field of inquiry has also interrogated assumptions about our relation to things and objects, opening questions about the agency of these forms as well as the networks, algorithms, and technical operations that they help constitute. While studying this intersection we will discuss cinema's relationship to these ideas, but this will be placed in a long history of moving images that we will interrogate along with the roles different techniques and technologies play in that history’s formation. The course will begin with an examination of nineteenth century optical devices like zoetropes and phenakistoscopes and then study handmade and industrial animation practices before focusing on digital animation, effects technology, and animation's relationship with video games. Particular attention will be paid to the role of movement in media aesthetics and the sense of vitality objects and figures take on in animation. How is life attributed to this illusion of movement? How is the threshold between the animate and inanimate used to define our understandings of media and mediation?

ENG 586 - Studies In Theory (3 credits)

Seminar in Post-Colonial Theory

This seminar will cover the emergence, institutionalization, and critiques of post-colonial theory. We will begin with manifestoes by indigenous and/or First Nations peoples followed by theorists/writers such as Chinua Achebe, Homi Bhabha, Aimé Césaire, Tsitsi Dangarembga, Frantz Fanon, Jamaica Kincaid, Albert Memmi, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Nawal el Saadawi, Ferdianand Oyono, Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, etc. Pertinent to our discussions will be theories of decolonizations, oritentalism, subaltern discourse, mimcry, hybridity, creolization and nation language. We will pay close attention to terms, issues, and contexts; to colonial discourse theory and analysis; post-colonial theory and criticism; (trans)nationalism, feminism and post-colonialism. We will complement theory readings with fiction and films.

ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

John J. Kessel

A writing workshop, exclusively, for the graduate students in the Master of Fine Arts program. Expect to produce (at least) three fiction submissions over the course of term.

ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will focus on works in progress, giving special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems.  Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision.  We will read single collections of contemporary poems, mostly early books or books that established the poet, as a way to begin thinking about the compilation of a manuscript. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and write at least one imitation. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works may be reviewed as well. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet. The course stresses reading as a writer.  For graduate students or advanced students with instructor’s permission. 

ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

John J. Kessel

English 590   Studies in Creative Writing:  The Novella

A workshop in writing the novella or short novel.  In the course of the semester we will read and discuss one novella a week, ranging from classics such as Tolstoy's The Death of Ivan Illyich to contemporary works such as Don De Lillo's Pafko at the Wall.  We will do writing assignments leading, by the end of the semester, to each student completing an original novella.  Classes will include workshop sessions where students comment on each other's work.

 

ENG 592 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (1-6 credits)

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600-level Courses


ENG 626 - Advanced Writing for Empirical Research (3 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

(penrose@ncsu.edu)

ENG 626 is a 3-credit-hour seminar and workshop for graduate students in empirical research fields who are working on grant proposals, theses and dissertations, papers for professional journals, conference proposals, or other significant research texts. The course provides intensive practice and feedback on writing, grounded in an introduction to rhetorical principles and analysis.

In consultation with the instructor, each participant develops a writing plan specifying 3-4 projects to be completed during the semester. Students analyze model texts from their respective fields, identifying the distinctive features of these texts and the writing practices common in each field. The expectations of readers, editors, and reviewers are discerned through analysis of RFPs, review criteria, editorial policies, style guides, and other supporting materials. Students review each others’ work and receive feedback on their writing from the instructor and from other members of the workshop. Course readings on writing theory and research provide a context for this feedback and practice. Based on the writing conventions and principles they discover, students prepare a final mini-lesson in which they analyze and illustrate a writing principle, convention, or practice appropriate for new members of their fields.

NOTE: ENG 626 is not designed to provide intensive language study for non-native speakers of English. Students interested in language instruction are advised to enroll in FLE 402 before taking ENG 626.

ENG 675 - Projects in Technical Communication (3 credits)

ENG 675 Projects in Technical Communication is a 3-credit "capstone course" for the MS Program in Technical Communication, taken as close as possible to the last semester of the student’s curriculum, in lieu of a thesis. You are eligible to enroll only if you are nearing the end of your coursework in the MS Program; you need previous coursework to develop a sustained, more complex project and to defend your projects before the MS faculty. Your projects are the subject matter of this course. Our class sessions will be conducted as seminars, with discussion centering on the progress and problems of researching, designing, developing, and defending a larger project, and on helping each other work within established deadlines and different fields. Your project will provide you with an opportunity to gain deeper insight into your field, and to acquire greater ability to work in the profession of technical communication.

ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3-6 credits)

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CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 790 - ( credits)

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800-level Courses


CRD 885 - Doctoral Supervised Teaching (1-3 credits)

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CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

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CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

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HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

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HON 293 - ( credits)

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HON 296 - ( credits)

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HON 298 - Honors Research/Independent Study (1-3 credits)

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300-level Courses


HON 395 - Honors Cooperative Education (3 credits)

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HON 397 - Honors Extension and Engagement (1-6 credits)

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400-level Courses


HON 498 - Honors Research/Creative Project 1 (3 credits)

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HON 499 - Honors Research/Creative Project 2 (3 credits)

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