Summer 2017 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 100 - Reading and Writing Rhetorically (4 credits)

Intensive practice in reading and writing critically and rhetorically, with attention to how those change according to purpose and situation. Introduction to rhetorical concepts and elements with application to a variety of academic, professional, or civic texts. Exploration of principles of argument and organization. Guidance in developing flexible, self-aware reading and composing processes. Practice in seeking, providing, and responding to constructive feedback. Practice with making choices about grammar, mechanics, and style appropriate to specific rhetorical situations. Extensive writing practice and individualized coaching to support ongoing development as a writer. Intended as preparation for ENG 101.

ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

200-level Courses


ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

ENG 220 - Studies in Great Works of Western Literature (3 credits)

ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

Significant British authors chosen from among such figures as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Pope, Austen, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Tennyson, Browning, Bronte, Dickens, Joyce, Eliot, Woolf, and Yeats.Credit will not be given for both ENG 251 andeither ENG 261 or 262.

ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

A survey of English literature to 1660, including Old English, Middle English, and Renaissance writing, focusing on such central authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Credit will not be given for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

Credit is not allowed for both ENG 261 and ENG 251.

ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

300-level Courses


ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

400-level Courses


ENG 448 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 486 - Shakespeare, The Earlier Plays (3 credits)

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (1 credit)

500-level Courses


ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study the African American literary tradition and experience from the perspective of African American writers. Designed to familiarize students with the study of literature at a progressive level, this course is a reading intense exercise in “close,” critical reading. During the course of the semester, we will explore the development of our country’s literature over the last half century, from the black perspective.  

With the help of several seminal texts, including short stories and novels, we will conduct a survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture as we understand it, with an emphasis on fiction (drama and poetry) from, roughly, World War II to the present. As literary critics and social historians, we will attempt to show how these texts in turn define America as we see it, think it, and/or hope it to be. Sometimes this conception is in correlation with that of the dominant culture; often, however, we will see, it is at odds with it.  This duality becomes, very much, the basis for African American consciousness in the twentieth century, something Du Bois labels a pervasive sense of “two-ness.” In addition, we will see how our chosen artists negotiate history, and how the past is ever-present in the African American text. 

ENG 558 - Studies In Shakespeare (3 credits)

Christopher James Crosbie

I wish to kill you, so I give you a poisoned cup. Not thirsty, you pass it along to a third person, who drinks the poison and dies. Am I guilty of murder or of something lesser? After all, while I had the intention to kill, I did not have the intention to kill the person who actually died, nor was I the one who gave that person the cup. The intuitive response may be that I am indeed a murderer, but, at the same time, both my internal disposition and the actual sequence of events trouble the logical process required to reach that outcome.

How we answer this question -- one adapted from a foundational legal case from early modern England -- depends heavily on a whole host of interrelated concerns. Are we narrowly asking a legal question or more broadly an ethical one? And, if the latter, through what ethical framework are we examining this question? The consequentialist assumptions of most post-Kantian ethics might lead us to one set of possible answers, but, in Shakespeare's era, Aristotelian virtue ethics -- synthetized in various ways with Catholic and Protestant theologies -- reigned supreme. How are we to understand the relative weight to place on one's intention when evaluating the culpability or innocence of an agent?

Shakespeare writes at a time when one's interior disposition toward external acts takes on especial importance in theological, legal, and, more generally, ethical discourses. Often, his plays (or key moments within his plays) hinge on the very question of intention. Did Ophelia commit suicide or did she die accidentally? What is the moral state of Hamlet when he fatally stabs Polonius, thinking he's killing the murderous king? Why does Iago hate the Moor, and why do all his declarations of motive ring hollow? When Angelo sleeps with the willing Marianna but only because, under cover of darkness, he thinks he's in fact raping a novice about to enter a convent is he, in the end, innocent or morally culpable? How should we think of the complex interplay between interior disposition and actual performed deed in Shakespearean drama?

This course will focus on the ethical quandaries represented within six Shakespearean plays (to be determined) with an eye toward understanding how intention mattered (or didn't) in Renaissance England. Along the way, we'll consider how such ethical concerns not only made for great theater but also, perhaps surprisingly, fashioned the early modern stage as a unique space for doing a kind of informal, vernacular, and public ethical philosophy.

Seminar participants will do substantial reading in primary and secondary sources, engage in vibrant online and in-class discussion, develop an extensive mid-semester Annotated Bibliography, and produce a final research paper on a topic of their choice related to the course theme.

600-level Courses


ENG 636 - Directed Readings (1-6 credits)

Ann M. Penrose

ENG 636 provides directed study in areas of special interest that are not addressed in the department's regular course offerings.  See the grad programs website for information about proposing an independent study: http://english.chass.ncsu.edu/graduate/current_students/directed_readings.php.

ENG 695 - Master's Thesis Research (1-9 credits)

ENG 699 - Master's Thesis Preparation (1-3 credits)

CRD

800-level Courses


CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)