Summer 2019 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

200-level Courses


ENG 207 - Studies in Poetry (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

This class seeks to give students a knowledge of poetry by examining the development of poetry in the West beginning with the epic tradition, followed by its incarnation in drama, then the lyric tradition and with that context, the course then focuses on more contemporary versions of poetry, including prose poetry. We will also read poetic prose and discuss what separates poetry from this kind of prose. Throughout the course, we will discuss key concepts such as poetic genre and the formal devices of poetry (such as metaphor) as part of the larger ambitions of the works under consideration. The course is structured, in other words, so as to allow students to see the long history of poetry and to enable them to see the various purposes to which it has been put.

Two out-of-class essays, a midterm and a final exam, and much participation will make up the course requirements.

ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

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ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

Paul Rodman Cockshutt Jr

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

Christa Williams Gala

A nuts-and-bolts class for editing different kinds of writing in the workplace--and your own. Master the mechanics of grammar, punctuation and AP Style, and implement those skills to make copy more concise and interesting. We'll also cover headline writing and the telltale signs of biased writing, libel and fake news. Learn how to fact-check, edit and rework copy with a discerning eye.

ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

“Traditional Non-Western Literature”

Readings in traditional literature, in translation, from Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas.  Students will be introduced to the origins and flourishing of these oldest cultures through the oral and written stories, poems, essays and plays that have become the defining works of these societies.  At the same time we will look at the geographical, historical, and philosophical contexts from which these texts arise. 

ENG 220 - Studies in Great Works of Western Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 224 - Contemporary World Literature II (3 credits)

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ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD

This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 246 - Literature of the Holocaust (3 credits)

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ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 255 - Beyond Britain: Literature from Colonies of the British Empire (3 credits)

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ENG 260 - Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality (3 credits)

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ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

James Robert Knowles

This course is an introduction to English literature from early Anglo-Saxon writings to the late seventeenth century. We will read a selection of major writers and texts from the Old English period, the Anglo-Norman period (Marie de France), the Middle English period (Chaucer, the Gawain poet, Julian of Norwich and Margery Kempe), the English Renaissance (Wyatt, Marlowe, Shakespeare), and the seventeenth century (the “metaphysical” poets), finishing in the 1660s with John Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost. Our approach to reading and discussing these texts will be twofold. First, the aesthetic approach to reading literature asks us to recognize these poems and plays as works of art with transhistorical value and enduring appeal. Secondly, the historical approach to reading literature asks us to understand the same texts as cultural objects which are deeply embedded in the times, places, and circumstances of their creation. Part of our task will be to recognize how and when our own twenty-first-century moral and aesthetic impulses (what we find beautiful or moving or gross) diverge from those of the writers we are studying. In other words, the aesthetic and the historical approaches to reading literature may sometimes be at odds with one another. Our job as readers is to notice and to describe such disconnections when they occur. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts on their own terms and to situate texts within their original cultural contexts.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

This course focuses on American literature from the Civil War to the present, with particular attention to the construction of, and contests around, race, class, gender, sexuality, and aspects of national identity. Surveying this field in a comprehensive way in one semester is an impossible task, of course, given the rich range of literatures written in the United States in the last century and a half. So this course makes this difficulty its subject matter by interrogating the contested ways that ideas of “American-ness” or categories of “American” have been constructed by various writers working and living in the United States. In particular, we will focus on several dominant, and sometimes paradoxical, ways of understanding what makes American literature distinctly “American.” American literature seems to reproduce an American culture that has a particular identity distinct from other global cultures. But, at the same time, the purportedly democratic nature of our culture means that American literature produces multiple, heterogeneous cultures that tug at the notion of an identifiable shared, singular “Americanness.” Our time during the semester will focus on the literary movements of late Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism with these challenges in mind, with attention to the role that race, class, gender, and national identity play.

ENG 281 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction (3 credits)

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ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

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ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

Belle McQuaide Boggs

This class provides an introduction to the basic elements and principles of three genres of creative writing: creative nonfiction, poetry, and fiction.

ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

Shervon Jude Cassim

This course is designed to teach the beginning writer how to write short fiction. Working under the hypothesis that the purpose of writing a short story is to manipulate the reader into seeing the world in a particular way, we will study the short story as a “device” that is constructed to accomplish that purpose.  Most of our in-class time will be spent on discussion—of published short stories, craft, and of your own short-story manuscripts. You will be using everything you learn in your own writing. By the end of the semester, you will know how to think like a writer of good short fiction and be able to take a problem-solving approach to crafting effective short fiction. You will know how to craft an effective short story, and you will have practice critiquing (constructively) your own writing and that of your classmates.

ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

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300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 308 - Contemporary Issues in Ecofeminism (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

This course defines and explains ecofeminism. It looks at its beginnings and evolution and the women and men involved in the process. The course will cover various aspects of ecofeminism including environmentalism, women’s rights, animals’ rights, and the rights of developing countries. The course will highlight the role literature plays in the dissemination of ecofeminist ideas, and we will be reading novels, memoir, short stories, and essays.

ENG 314 - Technical Document Design and Editing (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 315 - Phonetics (3 credits)

Jeffrey Ingle Mielke

This course is an introduction to phonetics: how spoken language is produced and perceived, and the physical properties of speech. An understanding of phonetics is fundamental to scientific and clinical approaches to speech and language.

ENG 316 - Introduction to News and Article Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 321 - Survey of Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

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ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

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ENG 324 - Modern English Syntax (3 credits)

Erik R Thomas

This course examines Modern English at the sentence level.  Analyses of both grammatical categories and grammatical structure are the primary components of the course. In addition, the role of language variation in English and its relationship to standards is considered.

ENG 327 - Language and Gender (3 credits)

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ENG 328 - Language and Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

Susan Jenny Emshwiller

Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, in-class written explorations of specific concepts, and sharing of students’ work we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. Students will learn about structure, characterization, creating dynamic dialogue, subtext, subplots, theme, exposition, etc. utilizing established screenplay formats. The course will involve studying great films and scripts, participating in critiques, and the writing and revising of original material. Over the course, students will write scenes focusing on specific screenwriting elements, and share and critique these pieces. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and will have a work-in-progress screenplay.

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 340 - Literature, Art, and Society (3 credits)

Jennifer Anne Nolan

This course will explore multiple intersections between the literary, visual, and performing arts in the first half of the twentieth century, including short stories, poetry, novels, illustrations, photography, and film, and their role as social commentary. Our investigations will take us into the literary and visual arts published in magazines of the 1910s and 1920s, such as The Crisis, the official magazine of the newly-formed NAACP edited by W.E.B. Du Bois, and the Saturday Evening Post, whose popularity and reach finds its modern-day equivalent in streaming services such as Netflix. We’ll also consider Depression-era photography and literature humanizing the plight of the poor and examine William Faulkner’s appropriation and reframing of the detective genre to challenge social injustice in his commercially successful Intruder in the Dust (1948) and the popular film made of it in 1949. The course will culminate with creative projects bringing our literary works into the present. Fulfills either the Humanities (HUM) or Interdisciplinary Perspectives (IP) GEP requirement.

ENG 349 - African Literature in English (3 credits)

Juliana Makuchi Nfah-Abbenyi PhD

This course will examine modern African literatures in English. We will read a variety of writings by contemporary male and female writers. Our approach to reading this selection of African writing will be historical, cultural, and aesthetic. We will seek to understand how the world-views embedded in these texts converge and/or diverge from our twenty-first century understanding of the African continent and its peoples. We will pay close attention to issues of language and identity, sexuality and cultural politics, class and gender relations, colonialism and postcolonialism, transnationalism and imperialism. We will supplement our fiction readings with interviews, critical essays, and films. Over the course of the semester, students will acquire the necessary vocabulary and technical skills needed to analyze literary texts, especially African literary texts (to which most students have not been exposed) and will learn to situate African literary texts within their original cultural contexts.

General Education Program: This course satisfies 3 credits of the GEP-Humanities and the GEP-Global Knowledge requirements.

 

ENG 350 - Professional Internships (3 credits)

Douglas M. Walls

Directed work experience for CHASS majors including work-site mentoring and evaluation. The goal for the course is to help students with career foundations as creative class professionals. Additionally, students will be provided an important introduction to the role that rhetorical thinking plays in the labor of groups of people like organizations or communities and how to think about building and maintaining their own careers as symbolic-analytic workers who identify and solve problems through digitally mediated writing. Department supervision includes course work directed toward designing employment application materials, developing a portfolio of professional work, considering a variety of career options, and reading literature on workplace socialization. Students are asked to provide their own internship opportunities as well as providing their own transportation to the internship site.

Visit the English Department Internship Program website for more information.

ENG 361 - Studies in British Poetry (3 credits)

Sharon M. Setzer

Romantic Poetry in 1819

Marking the two hundredth anniversary of poetry composed and/or published in the momentous year of 1819, this course will focus on P. B. Shelley’s critiques of political and domestic tyranny, Keats’s great odes and narrative poems of 1819, and the first two cantos of Byron’s transgressive epic, Don Juan.  In addition to exploring the biographical, political, and cultural contexts in which poems were composed and published, we will also examine their reception history from 1819 to the present.  Requirements include regular class participation, one short paper (4-5 pages), one longer paper (7-8 pages), two tests, and a final exam.

ENG 364 - History of Film to 1940 (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 376 - Science Fiction (3 credits)

Thomas P. Phillips

This section of Eng 376 examines the science fiction genre from the general standpoint of its aesthetic and thematic development as aligned with historical contexts, the latter being invariably connected to technological advances. Specifically, it will follow the genre’s ongoing fascination for and insights into the category of the human.

Assessment: class participation, two formal essays, and two exams.

ENG 378 - Women & Film (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

This course introduces students to the analysis of gender in film and media history, theory, and criticism. The course teaches students to look at the ways film and other audiovisual media has (and has not been) by, for, and about women–on and offscreen. Accordingly, the course looks at a range of issues, including: debates about the male vs the female gaze in the cinema; the cinematic techniques and strategies by which gender is constructed onscreen; the depiction of sexuality and sexual violence in film; film form and genre; national vs. transnational cinema; spectatorship; race; and class. The course is structured as a seminar, with an emphasis on developing students' ability to analyze films/visual media and critical readings and develop and articulate arguments. Filmmakers, television shows, and authors to be considered include Lena Dunham (of HBO's Girls), Alfred Hitchcock (Rebecca and Shadow of a Doubt), Vera Chytilová (Daisies), Niels Oplev/David Fincher (The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo), Thomas Vinterberg (The Celebration) Cristian Mungiu (Graduation), Catherine Breillat, Lina Wertmüller (Seven Beauties), Paul Verhoeven (Black Book and Elle), Park Chan-wook (The Handmaiden), Agnès Varda (Faces Places), Kendrick Lamar, and Beyoncé (Lemonade), among others.

ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

Crime and Punishment: Criminality in 20th - 21st century Film and Literature

This course examines the figure of the criminal as well as the concepts of criminality, justice, and punishment in 20th - 21st century film and literature. Topics to be explored include the following: Why has crime been such  a  compelling  subject  for  filmmakers and television since  the  invention  of  both media?  What  are  the conventions and limits of the genre? How have various national cinemas and/or national trend in television, and/or works of literature depicted crime in ways that comment on and reflect particular historical moments and contexts? How do films and works of literature about criminals and criminality represent distinctions not only between male and female positions of control and aggression, but also between the differences in male and female experiences of, or responses to violent crime, either as victims or as witnesses? This course will also use the detective story (films and literary works that explore the process of solving crimes) to introduce theories of analyzing films and works of literature. In other words, just as there are methods that investigators follow in reconstructing a crime, or the scene of a crime, film and literary analysis itself involves certain modes of identifying, collecting, analyzing, and interpreting evidence. Students should be aware that some of the films and literary works included in the course contain graphic, potentially disturbing depictions of criminal behavior and violence. The course is structured as a seminar, with an emphasis on discussion (and thus class participation is important) and on developing students' ability to analyze films/visual media and critical readings and develop and articulate arguments The course includes works by Luchino Visconti (Obsession); Nicholas Ray (In a Lonely Place)  ; François Truffaut (The 400 Blows);  Martin Scorsese (Goodfellas);Stanley Kubrick (The Killing); Alfred Hitchcock (The Shadow of A Doubt and Vertigo), Thomas Narcejac and Pierre Boileau (The Living and the Dead); Orson Welles (The Lady From Shanghai);  Lina Wertmüller (Seven Beauties);  Jessica Blank and Eric Jensen (The Exonerated: A Play); Josh and Ben Safdie (Good Time); Hannah Arendt (Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil); Paul Verhoeven (Elle), Craig Gillespie (I, Tonya); David Cronenberg (Eastern Promises)Jonathan Glazer, and Joel and Ethan Cohen, among others.

 

ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 393 - Studies in Literary Genre (3 credits)

Sujata Sudhakar Mody

Section 1- Drama in Modern India 

This course provides a focused treatment of drama in modern India as it has evolved since the late 19th century. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre, especially as an intricate weave of modern vernacular traditions with both classical Sanskrit and western dramatic traditions. After a brief introduction to the classical Sanskrit tradition as well as pre-colonial folk and devotional theater traditions, which remained central points of reference through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will move on to the main focus of the course, colonial and post-colonial theater in India. All readings are available in English translation.

 

Section 3 - Modern Hindi-Urdu Short Story

This course provides a focused treatment of the modern short story in Hindi/Urdu. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre from the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern genre in the colonial and nationalist periods in South Asian literary history; students will also be introduced to some writing from India and Pakistan in the post-Independence era. All readings are available in English translation.

ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

Nupoor Jalindre

Digital Rhetoric for Artificial Interactions/Intelligence (AI)

This class focuses on both rhetorical theory and praxis to help in redefining what information design means for artificial intelligence platforms. Through close readings and provocative discussion of texts, students will explore theories of rhetoric and AI in relation to topics such as identity, gender, posthumanism and culture. Along with rhetorical analysis, students will also learn to build chatbots using latest tools and technologies. The design components enable students to visualize socio-technical networks in the making of chatbots, develop algorithmic structures and test their design for diverse audiences.

ENG 399 - Contemporary Literature (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

Maurice Blanchot’s famous book The Writing of the Disaster meditates on the problems of writing on catastrophe and loss in the twentieth century, a century of epic catastrophe and loss. This course will examine writers who focus on social catastrophe (World War II; the Holocaust, the suffocating effects of totalitarianism; exile and 9/11) as well as the slow-motion catastrophes that afflict civilizations (especially the predatory capitalism of recent memory and the rise of religious fanaticism and terrorism). The writing of disaster is also, inevitably, writing on that which is taboo—that which must not be said, which often includes sex, violence and death in civilizations that have come apart or are under great strain. How do civilizations deal with disaster? How do writers write on disaster and taboo subjects? What strategies do they employ? How do they (and we) remember? Texts will include Primo Levi’s Survival In Auschwitz, Allen Ginsbert, Howl, Wislawa Szymborksa, Selected Poems, Cormac McCarthy’s Child of God, Aleksandar Hemon, The Lazarus Project, WG Sebald’s The Emigrants, Peter Riley’s A Map of Faring, Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, CD Wright’s One Big Self, Frank Bidart, Music Like Dirt, Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Claudia Rankine, Citizen and Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being. Formal requirements: a midterm exam, a final exam, two out of class essays. And lots of discussion.

400-level Courses


ENG 400 - Applied Criticism (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 410 - Studies in Gender and Genre (3 credits)

Barbara A Bennett

Contemporary Southern Novels by Women

This course will look at important women writers coming from the South in the last few decades, including such women as Lee Smith, Jill McCorkle, Jessmyn Ward, and Tayari Jones. 

ENG 411 - Rhetorical Criticism (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Paul Christopher Isom

The purpose of the course is to prepare the student for advanced reporting in print/broadcast media. Topics can include in-depth coverage of local, state, and national government; criminal justice and the courts; business and economics; science and health matters; coverage of education, science, religion and sports. This course will seek to enhance both the student’s knowledge of these topics and the student’s ability to successfully report on them.

ENG 421 - Computer Documentation Design (3 credits)

Melissa F. Hannah
The purpose of ENG 421 is to introduce you to the principles of technical documentation and
technical communication: how technical communicators move their readers to beliefs or actions
through the skilled use of verbal, visual, and interactive discourse. The course works through the
theory and design of documentation for computer hardware and software, including user guides,
reference manuals, quick reference guides, tutorials, and online documentation for various media
delivery systems. This course also trains you in alternative forms of documentation: testing
procedures, usability testing, and collaborative revision. This course will discuss issues of
accessibility and inclusivity when training you in these forms of technical documentation. The
course is part of the Certificate in Professional Writing.

ENG 426 - Analyzing Style (3 credits)

David M Rieder

Introduction to the analysis of style in print-based texts, hypertexts, and visual culture. The semester will be divided among three analytical approaches. First, we begin with Richard Lanham's textbook, Analyzing Prose, which introduces you to the important roles that style plays in prose writing. This first section will offer you a grounding in the rhetorical canon of style. Next, we'll study the changing role of style in the electronic form of hypertext writing. We'll focus our attention on Shelley Jackson's hypertext novel, Patchwork Girl. Finally, we'll look up and off the page/screen to analyze (postmodern) American culture, which is heavily influenced by communicational issues related to style.

In addition to two 6-7 page essays (and other shorter writing assignments), you will learn how to write a hypertextual essay in StorySpace, the same software program that Jackson used to write her hypertext novel.

ENG 439 - 17th-Century English Literature (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 452 - Medieval British Literature (3 credits)

James Robert Knowles

This course is designed as an introduction to literature in Middle English, excluding Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. We will read a selection of major texts contemporary with Chaucer’s literary career, beginning with his other masterpiece, the historical romance of Troilus and Criseyde. From here we will move on to the works of the anonymous Pearl-poet, including the chivalric tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, the dream-elegy called Pearl, and Patience, a retelling of the Book of Jonah written in vigorous alliterative verse. The second half of the course will focus on the extraordinary range of religious writing in late medieval England: from the allegorical dream-vision of William Langland’s Piers Plowman, to the civic spectacle of the York Mystery plays, to the visionary theology of Julian of Norwich (the first English woman to be identified as an author--though her true identity remains a mystery). No prior knowledge of Middle English is required. Instruction (and practice) in how to read and interpret Middle English poetry and prose will be a major component of the course, but for some of the texts we will enlist the help of facing-page modern translations. 

ENG 460 - Major British Author (3 credits)

Leila S May

In this course we will enter into the world of three of the nineteenth century's most remarkable figures--Anne, Emily, and Charlotte Brontë.  The Yorkshire moors on which they were raised provided them with a mysterious refuge from the forces of a rapidly changing, increasingly industrialized nation while at the same time it reflected the intrusion of that tumultuous and often sinister world.  The synthesis of these elements in the Brontës' novels produces some of the most compelling and enigmatic literature in the English language.  We will read the Brontës' major fiction; in addition, we will become familiar with the biographies of the sisters, as well as with some of their poetry and juvenilia.

ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

Robin M Dodsworth

Language in Raleigh 

Language in Raleigh isn’t what it used to be. A few decades ago, most people who grew up in Raleigh sounded Southern, and their only native language was English. Then IBM and other research- and technology-focused companies in Research Triangle Park began to attract people to Raleigh from both inside and outside the South, creating a richly heterogeneous dialect contact setting that has (so far) led to the gradual loss of the traditional Southern dialect and the emergence of a new dialect with few (but not zero) regionally distinctive features. Yet the loss of the Southern dialect has happened unevenly across Raleigh; as we will see, social class, gender, geography, and ethnicity have all played a role in determining who talks Southern and who doesn’t. At the same time, migration of Spanish speakers to the area has intensified, and many children growing up here natively speak both English and Spanish. In this course, we look closely at the ways in which language has changed in Raleigh, including phonetic, phonological, lexical, and syntactic features of both English and Spanish. We centrally ask how Raleigh’s economic, cultural, and geographic landscape have both promoted linguistic change and maintained linguistic diversity within the community, and whether Raleigh can be viewed as a typical case of urban dialect contact.

ENG 495 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

Margaret Simon

Graphic Novel: Text, Image, Interpretation 

Every day we are bombarded with a dizzying variety of written, visual, and multimodal messages. What are the relations of written text and image in our highly mediated world? How do text and image make different types of arguments? How can they be integrated to make persuasive narratives or social critique? This course explores these broad issues through the experimental textual forms and ambitious visual narratives of the contemporary graphic novel and its historical precedents. We will read a mixture of literary and interdisciplinary texts to consider how novelists, journalists, and researchers are using the possibilities of text and image to interpret complex and sometimes controversial information and even to explore their own roles as authors. The cartoonist Will Eisner has written that “stereotype is an essential tool in the language of graphic storytelling.” We will evaluate this statement, coming to understand how an artist’s visual “voice” shapes our perception of the characters and social conditions a work conveys.

The course aims to foster flexible critical reading practices and to develop students’ capacities in written as well as visual forms of academic argument. This course involves regular in-class writing, short reading responses, and a final critical project that expands students’ skills in critical argument to multi-modal composition. Depending on students’ talents and interests, this project could also involve a service learning component as students seek out untold stories in their own communities (broadly construed) that might benefit from this form of narrative-graphic re-mediation.

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (3-6 credits)

Brian Blackley

Shakespeare, Resources, Revisions

If Shakespeare were writing today, no doubt he would be the subject of many lawsuits contesting his right to use source material from various authors. Consistent with the Renaissance ideal of imitatio, Shakespeare freely borrowed from, mixed, and re-visioned material from short stories, history books, poems, and dramas to create his stage plots. Likewise, many contemporary film producers and directors have made their own adaptations, mixing the modern and the Elizabethan to re-create and re-invigorate the plays. This study proposes to examine carefully the various source materials – from Ovid’s Metamorphoses to Holinshed’s Chronicles – that Shakespeare used in some of his most esteemed plays. Most importantly we will examine what he left out of the source materials, and ask how those decisions and revisions make the plays uniquely Shakespearean. As a final consideration for each play we will examine what contemporary film adaptations have deleted or revised in order to entertain audiences. Students will have regular reading quizzes, make in-class presentations, and write one long essay.

500-level Courses


ENG 508 - Usability Studies for Technical Communication (3 credits)

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ENG 510 - Middle English Literature (3 credits)

Timothy Linwood Stinson

This course will survey major works of medieval English literature, considering them in a historical context that reveals both their influences on and reflections of social and cultural change. We will examine how poets of the era drew upon a wide range of sources, including Anglo-Saxon traditions, continental genres and verse forms, Scripture and religious writings, and classical histories, legends, and myths, to create new forms of English poetry that responded in subtle and sophisticated ways to social upheaval, linguistic change, and political turmoil. Topics to be covered include Arthurian literature, dreams and visions in medieval literature, ballads and lyrics (including early Robin Hood narratives), courtly romance, and literary models of ideal societies.

ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

This course provides an introduction to foundational theories and research in the field of composition studies, and is a prerequisite for graduate students who are assigned to teach ENG 101 in the First-Year Writing Program. During the semester, we focus on the dynamic and sometimes competing nature of theories and research, keeping in mind the historical and political contexts in which they emerged. The goal of the course is to examine assumptions underlying current theory and research and to explore implications for the teaching and practice of writing. Conducted as a seminar, the course is designed to help new members of the field to:

  • familiarize themselves with the range of voices and theoretical assumptions underlying the teaching of writing;
  • understand various histories of the field of composition studies;
  • become acquainted with major journals and resources in the field of composition, sufficient for conducting independent explorations of research and theory on topics of interest;
  • develop a reading knowledge of research methods in composition, sufficient for interpreting and evaluating the results of published research in the field;
  • apply knowledge of the field’s history, theory, and research in analyzing new contexts, developing new pedagogical insights, and raising new questions for research.

ENG 514 - History Of Rhetoric (3 credits)

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ENG 517 - Advanced Technical Writing, Editing and Document Design (3 credits)

Jason Swarts PhD

The purpose of ENG 517 is to introduce students to the rhetorical practices of technical communication, how technical communicators move their readers to beliefs or actions through the skilled use of verbal, visual, and interactive discourse. This course is primarily practice oriented. We will be writing and designing in media and forms that are common to technical communication, including traditional print-based documents (like descriptions and procedures) but also contemporary and technically-challenging formats like images, video, and structured content (DITA). I will also ask you to work on the finer points of your technical style by learning how to write clearly, cohesively, concisely, and concretely. At the end of the semester, you will have the start of a portfolio of writing and design that you can take to an interview.

ENG 520 - Science Writing for the Media (3 credits)

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ENG 525 - Variety In Language (3 credits)

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ENG 527 - Discourse Analysis (3 credits)

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ENG 534 - Quantitative Analysis in Sociolinguistics (3 credits)

Robin M Dodsworth

This course is an advanced survey of quantitative methods in variationist sociolinguistics, to be taken after ENG 523. We will look in detail at the quantitative methods used most often to evaluate language variation and change: multivariate linear and logistic regression, mixed effects models, and PCA. Whereas ENG 523 gives a practical introduction to these and other methods, this course delves into the math and also takes a more nuanced practical approach. In addition to statistical techniques, the course involves detailed graphical analysis of linguistic data using R. As such, basic proficiency in R is required.

ENG 539 - Seminar In World Literature (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

This course examines modernist literary, filmic, and artistic modernist movements of the twentieth century in a global context. The traditional story of modernist literature was for a long time a narrowly circumscribed affair, focusing mainly on Anglo-European literature produced between 1914-1945 and enlivened by an occasional dose of Irish and American expatriate writers (a very small way that global movement was a recognized part of modernism, conventionally defined). But over the last decade or so, the fields of cultural studies, critical race theory, women's studies, postcolonial studies, political theory, and cultural geography have helped modernist studies become more responsive to the dynamics of colonization and imperialism, to race, and to ideas about nation and sovereignty. The result has been an expansion of modernism’s geographic borders (to imagine “modernist literature” to mean more than texts produced in Paris/London/New York) as well as a push to extend its temporal borders later into the twentieth century (as one scholar has put it, to assume modernism exists between the two world wars is like one hand clapping).

This course will explore an array of Anglo/American/European and non-western modernist writers spanning the globe and will feature texts that are both familiar and less well-known in the modernist canon. Primary authors will be drawn from this slightly longer list: James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, E.M. Forster, French surrealist novelist Rene Crevel, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Jean Rhys, Albert Camus, Sarojini Naidu, Rabindranath Tagore, Premchand, Mulk Raj Anand, Naguib Mahfouz, Tayeb Salih, Amitav Ghosh, and/or Arundati Roy. Films may include Borderline (1930) or Dark Sands/Jericho (1937). The first half of the twentieth century will be our main emphasis but the last portion of the course will push beyond this. Alongside primary works, we will read some scholarly texts that address empire, cosmopolitanism, globalization, geopolitics, translation, diaspora, and planetarity.

Cross-listed with FL 539

ENG 548 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Marc K. Dudley

This course is designed to offer students an opportunity to study the African American literary tradition and experience from the perspective of African American writers. Designed to familiarize students with the study of literature at a progressive level, this course is a reading intense exercise in “close,” critical reading. During the course of the semester, we will explore the development of our country’s literature over the last half century, from the black perspective.  

With the help of several seminal texts, including short stories and novels, we will conduct a survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture as we understand it, with an emphasis on fiction (drama and poetry) from, roughly, World War II to the present. As literary critics and social historians, we will attempt to show how these texts in turn define America as we see it, think it, and/or hope it to be. Sometimes this conception is in correlation with that of the dominant culture; often, however, we will see, it is at odds with it.  This duality becomes, very much, the basis for African American consciousness in the twentieth century, something Du Bois labels a pervasive sense of “two-ness.” In addition, we will see how our chosen artists negotiate history, and how the past is ever-present in the African American text. 

ENG 558 - Studies In Shakespeare (3 credits)

Christopher James Crosbie

Twisted Comedy: Shakespeare and the Absurd, Dark, and Joyous


In this class, we will read, watch, enjoy, and discuss the many forms of twisted comedy that permeate Shakespeare’s plays.  As a genre, comedy (so the conventional narrative goes) drives toward amicable resolution and the reaffirmation of the positive elements of human existence.  As with all generic classifications, however, this tells only part of the truth. Shakespearean comedy, for example, overflows with disturbingly dark plotlines, ambiguous resolutions, and even hints of tragedy to come.  Measure for Measure takes as its central narrative the attempted sexual assault on a woman entering a convent.  All’s Well That Ends Well depicts a love story between a woman and man who will do everything possible to avoid her.  Both plays stage ‘bed tricks’ where lovers are duped into sleeping with someone they never intended to be with.  Plays such as Othello launch their tragic tales by staging, for a full half of a play, a narrative that is generically comedic.  And, at the end of Shakespeare’s career, the dramatist creates comedies that include, among other disturbing matters, slavery, the death of children, sex trafficking, dismemberment by a bear (!!), and unrepentant villains who conclude their plays just as murderous as when the stories began.  Do the dark elements of Shakespearean comedy trouble our notions of genre? Do they sit in contradistinction to comedy as conventionally received? Or are they in some fashion essential for constituting the positive vision of humanity we’ve come to expect when we hear the word “comedy?” Through six plays, ample group discussion, and the comparative study of multiple film adaptations, this course will examine these and related questions.  Along the way, we’ll situate Shakespeare’s plays in his own culture and re-think their position in our own as well.

ENG 560 - Victorian Poetry and Critical Prose (3 credits)

Antony Howard Harrison

This seminar will approach analysis of poems written in Victorian England by looking at prevalent poetic forms and prosodic devices used differently by male and female poets to comment upon a variety of social, political, aesthetic, economic, and religious issues of the day—from concerns with the effects of industrialism, empire, and social unrest to matters of faith, love, and sexuality. Focusing on the diverse uses of lyric forms (such as the sonnet and the ode), dramatic forms (such as the monologue), and narrative forms (such as the ballad, tale, and epic) can provide a dynamic perspective on the vexed issues surrounding Victorian gender relations. Doing so can also help us learn how those issues informed discourse on public controversies during an era in which England emerged as the world’s first industrial nation and unrivaled super power. Poets to be studied include Christina Rossetti, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Felicia Hemans, Letitia Landon, Jean Ingelow, Augusta Webster, Michael Field, Alfred Tennyson, Robert Browning, William Morris, Dante Rossetti, A. C. Swinburne, and Gerard Manley Hopkins, among others.

The work of these poets retains its ability to enchant, amaze and inspire. Victorian poetry, as a vast and extraordinarily complex body of productions, employs every established verse form in the language and exploits every established poetic subgenre, while refining upon some, such as the dramatic monologue, the verse drama and the pastoral elegy, in ways previously unimagined. Produced by authors of both sexes in every social class from all districts in the British Isles (and indeed the colonies), it engages a remarkable variety of cultural discourses – political, religious, social, economic and scientific – in both direct and nuanced ways that still strike readers as highly original, and also aesthetically and ideologically powerful.

Students will write questions for each class to help prompt discussion, present a “problem paper” for one class (based upon the readings for that day), and write a research paper as the culmination of their work in the course.

ENG 577 - 20th-Century American Prose (3 credits)

James M. Grimwood

Narrative and expository prose in the United States between the Age of Edison and the Age of Amazon—from America’s acquisition of a colonial empire, through three world wars and an economic depression, to the global triumph (and tragedy) of U.S. consumer capitalism. Large themes: reactions against Victorianism and realism; germination and multiple fruition of Modernism; various post-Modernisms; music, painting, theater, cinema, radio, video, net; privacy and the public domain; literature as record, as game, as therapy; earth, water, air, fire; time, space. Writing assignments: emphasis on placement of short stories in contemporary cultural contexts. Cast of thousands includes James, Cather, Stein, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Welty, O’Connor, Bellow, Baldwin, Pynchon, Oates, Carver, McCarthy, DeLillo, etc. Average velocity of course (21 minutes and 30 seconds per year) not uniformly maintained. Two papers, including a term project; midterm and final exams.

ENG 583 - Studies In Rhetoric and Writing (3 credits)

Casie J Fedukovich

Feminist Theories and Research in Composition Studies 

This course will explore the multiple, complex, overlapping, and often contradictory histories of feminist theories and research in the field of composition studies. We will approach the discussion historically, with a focus on how the discipline of composition studies emerged within matrices of power, including along gender lines, but also gender’s intersection with race, class, nationality, sexual identity, ability, and other identity categories. Grounded in the idea that teaching and learning are always political acts that cannot be separated from their historical and material contexts, this course will examine the relationships among writing pedagogies and critical, liberatory, progressive, and radical practices.

We will also explore qualitative research methods and methodologies that identify themselves as explicitly feminist. 

Students will be invited to plot their own path through and beyond the readings in the course as demonstrated through major projects that may include reviews of scholarship, creation of research materials, and frequent, informal reflections.

This course also fulfills 3 credits toward the CRDM qualitative research methods requirement.

ENG 587 - Interdisciplinary Studies in English (3 credits)

Andrew Robert Johnston

Methods and Theories in Media Studies

This seminar will explore key theoretical and methodological issues in media studies. We will discuss approaches, paradigms, as well as discourses about media landscapes and objects in order to prepare students to engage in various forms of research. Topics will include historiography, media archaeology, ethnographic approaches to media, cultural hierarchy and taste, formalism and aesthetics, feminist theory, and analyses of political economy and media institutions. We will engage with a variety of media, from broadcast television and cinema to mobile technologies and social networks.

ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Belle McQuaide Boggs

A writing workshop exclusively for the graduate students in the Master of Fine Arts program. Expect to produce (at least) three fiction submissions over the course of term.

ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Eduardo C Corral

An intensive practicum in the writing of poetry: students will write and revise their own poetry, participate in a weekly workshop of evaluation and criticism, and read extensively the work of contemporary poets. This course is designed to give students extensive practice in the writing of poetry – from drafting to revision—and to demonstrate the close relationship between reading and writing through the evaluation of creative work by contemporary poets, as well as original student poetry.

ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

Miriam E Orr

Memoir Writing Workshop

This is a course for those who wish to expand their writing repertoire by spending a semester immersed in memoir.  Workshop members will submit work in progress within the genre for in-class critique.  The coursework will include reading from exemplary classical and contemporary memoirs.  Memoir writing is an excellent way for fiction and poetry writers to unlock and explore subterranean material that will bring greater richness to their primary genre.  For M.A. students, memoir may be an avenue to greater self-awareness in relation to scholarly writing, and for any writer, memoir is an avenue to hybrid forms.  The course invites experimentation with structure and style.

Memoirists we will read may include Joan Didion, J.M. Coetzee, Nabokov, Annie Dillard, David Payne, Mary Karr, Stephen King, and Dave Eggers, among others. Requisites include a graduate course in fiction or poetry writing, or instructor approval with the submission and approval of a short writing sample.

600-level Courses


ENG 624 - Teaching College Composition (3 credits)

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ENG 626 - Advanced Writing for Empirical Research (3 credits)

Huiling Ding

ENG 626 is a seminar and workshop for graduate students in empirical research fields who are working on grant proposals, theses and dissertations, papers for professional journals, conference proposals, or other significant research texts. The course provides intensive practice and feedback on writing, grounded in an introduction to rhetorical principles and analysis.

ENG 669 - Literature, Methods, and the Profession (3 credits)

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ENG 675 - Projects in Technical Communication (3 credits)

ENG 675 Projects in Technical Communication is a 3-credit "capstone course" for the MS Program in Technical Communication, taken as close as possible to the last semester of the student’s curriculum, in lieu of a thesis. You are eligible to enroll only if you are nearing the end of your coursework in the MS Program; you need previous coursework to develop a sustained, more complex project and to defend your projects before the MS faculty. Your projects are the subject matter of this course. Our class sessions will be conducted as seminars, with discussion centering on the progress and problems of researching, designing, developing, and defending a larger project, and on helping each other work within established deadlines and different fields. Your project will provide you with an opportunity to gain deeper insight into your field, and to acquire greater ability to work in the profession of technical communication.

ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

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ENG 685 - Master's Supervised Teaching (3 credits)

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3-6 credits)

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800-level Courses


ENG 810 - Directed Readings in English Studies (1-6 credits)

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CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 701 - History and Theory of Media Technologies (3 credits)

Andrew Robert Johnston

How have scholars grappled with the ways different technologies shape structures of knowledge, cultural practices, and aesthetic experiences? What theoretical and conceptual frameworks have been employed to write the histories of those mediations? How are technological landscapes shaped by social and cultural influences or by contemporaneous ideas about media? Furthermore, how do communication technologies from the past continue to exist and inform the ways we develop and use new ones?

This seminar will explore historical and theoretical approaches to these questions that have shaped research into media and communication technologies. We will move through different historical periods, from early writing practices to 19th century optical devices and communication networks, to recording and storage technologies like film and the phonograph, as well as more contemporary media like the floppy disk and IP network. This episodic and archaeological approach will allow us to examine the constellation of political, social, and technological operations that influence one another at those junctures. It will also allow us to critically examine theoretical perspectives on those formations that have influenced historiographical perspectives, from hermeneutics and marxism to the public sphere and materialism. Throughout the seminar we will explore these engagements with media landscapes of the past in order to better understand contemporary engagements with technologies as well as the aesthetic and cultural practices tied to them.

CRD 702 - Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

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CRD 704 - Communication, Technologies, and Pedagogy (3 credits)

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800-level Courses


CRD 809 - Colloquium in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media (1 credit)

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CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

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CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

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CRD 895 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (1-9 credits)

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CRD 899 - Doctoral Dissertation Preparation (1-9 credits)

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HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

Leila S May

What does it mean to label someone monstrous or mad? All cultures have some means of identifying those who transgress accepted boundaries and standards of established behavior.  Looking at the ways in which these loosely related concepts are rendered in a given historical moment is a useful way of assessing the most strongly defended values of a particular culture and era.  This course will examine how these categories of exclusion have been represented across a broad spectrum of British and American literary, anthropological, medical, sociological, and cinematic works of the last two centuries. In the process, students will develop their critical and interpretive skills as readers, and their analytical and rhetorical strategies as writers.

Catherine Mary Mainland

HON 202: The Art of War

Whether nations win or lose, war has always left its mark on the arts. This course will take a comparative look at artistic responses to the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and modern military campaigns. Through our examination of the history and social psychology of war, we will pay constant attention to the infinitely human urge to use art to deal with the inhumane, comedy to combat tragedy, and story-telling to work through feelings of guilt, loss, inadequacy, or doubt. With readings of poetry, drama, and prose from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and works ranging from cinema and television to video games, we will explore the ways in which humans deal with wars and their aftermath by placing them (safely?) in the artistic realm.

We will study works such as: Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Bierce, “Chickamauga”; Howells, “Editha”; British poetry of WWI; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Camus, The Plague; M*A*S*H* selected episodes; The Producers (1968); O'Brien, The Things They Carried; and paintings and posters related to the wars we will discuss.

HON 293 - ( credits)

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HON 296 - ( credits)

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HON 297 - Honors Special Topics - Interdisciplinary Perspectives/US Diversity (3 credits)

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