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Spring 2020 Courses

ENG

100-level Courses


ENG 101 - Academic Writing and Research (4 credits)

Intensive instruction in academic writing and research. Basic principles of rhetoric and strategies for academic inquiry and argument. Instruction and practice in critical reading, including the generative and responsible use of print and electronic sources for academic research. Exploration of literate practices across a range of academic domains, laying the foundation for further writing development in college. Continued attention to grammar and conventions of standard written English. Most sections meet in computer classrooms. Successful completion of ENG 101 requires a grade of C- or better. This course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Prerequisite: A grade of C- or better in ENG 100 or placement via English department guidelines.

ENG 105 - Writing and Research in the Disciplines (1 credit)

Examination of inquiry and writing across a range of academic disciplines, laying the foundation for further writing development in college-level writing across the curriculum. Refinement of basic principles of rhetoric and how those connect to writing in disciplinary communities. Restricted to transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course Successful completion of ENG 105 requires a grade of C- or better. Together with approved transfer credit hours, this course satisfies the Introduction to Writing component of the General Education Program.

Restricted to: Transfer students with a transferring first-year writing course.

200-level Courses


ENG 207 - Studies in Poetry (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 208 - Studies In Fiction (3 credits)

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ENG 209 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

Ten of Shakespeare’s thirty-seven plays will be read during this sixteen-week semester. We will study Shakespeare as both Poet and Dramatist. The task will be to develop a solid critical appreciation of each text (or “script”) by employing a variety of critical approaches to the form and content with an eye towards understanding how these approaches might engage the problems and choices involved in making the text (“script”) viable, comprehensible, relevant to the reader and entertaining to an audience in performance.

ENG 210 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics (3 credits)

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ENG 214 - Introduction to Editing (3 credits)

Paul Rodman Cockshutt Jr

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

Christa Williams Gala

A nuts-and-bolts class for editing different kinds of writing in the workplace--and your own. Master the mechanics of grammar, punctuation and AP Style and implement those skills to make copy more concise and interesting. We'll also cover headline writing and the telltale signs of biased writing, libel and fake news. Learn how to fact-check, edit and rework copy with a discerning eye.

ENG 219 - Studies in Great Works of Non-Western Literature (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

“Traditional Non-Western Literature”

Readings in traditional literature, in translation, from Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, China, Japan, and the Americas.  Students will be introduced to the origins and flourishing of these oldest cultures through the oral and written stories, poems, essays and plays that have become the defining works of these societies.  At the same time we will look at the geographical, historical, and philosophical contexts from which these texts arise. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 221 - Literature of the Western World I (3 credits)

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ENG 222 - Literature of the Western World II (3 credits)

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ENG 223 - Contemporary World Literature I (3 credits)

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ENG 232 - Literature and Medicine (3 credits)

Lindsey Catherine Andrews PhD

This is an interdisciplinary course that fits broadly into the category of "Medical Humanities," which considers how humanistic, social science, and arts disciplines interact with the field of medicine. In this class, we will analyze the social aspects of medical knowledge by using literature—memoirs, fiction, and poetry—as a lens through which to understand diagnosis and treatment practices. Throughout the semester, we will examine aesthetic representation and linguistic play as means for unpacking the often hidden assumption that undergird medical knowledge and inform treatment practices. The texts we investigate will help us to understand how medical knowledge is produced, how treatment regimens are determined, and why social biases persist in medical practice. Perhaps most importantly, it will help us think about how and why the language we use around illness, pathology, disability, death and dying matters. The works we will read suggest that literature and art are not useful merely for historical insight, but they also offer crucial alternatives to dominant medical narratives. Although we will look at the long history of medical practice and the emergence of professional medicine, our texts will be drawn primarily from twentieth-century US authors. Authors may include: Carson McCullers, William Carlos Williams, Emily Dickinson, Sylvia Plath, Octavia Butler, Virginia Woolf, Christina Crosby, Gayl Jones, Susanna Kaysen, Frank Bidart, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph Ellison, and William Burroughs.

ENG 248 - Survey of African-American Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 251 - Major British Writers (3 credits)

Antony Howard Harrison

This section of ENG 251 is designed to introduce students to works written by significant, influential British authors writing in all literary genres from about 1600 to 2000 (William Shakespeare to Zadie Smith). The works we will focus on are especially concerned with questions of “otherness” and with disrupting readers’ assumptions and preconceptions about many issues, including gender, race, sexuality, science, and religion. We will discuss one play, one short work of nonfiction prose, a number of poems, two novels, and a novella—a substantial amount of reading that students must keep up with. We will analyze these works in detail, as well as some of their important social, historical, political, and cultural contexts.  Requirements: Students will take twelve very brief in-class quizzes (5 mins. each) and two exams (midterm and final).  They will also write one four-to-six-page critical paper (on an assigned topic) that involves making an argument based on analysis of relevant passages from texts on the syllabus. Finally, each student will collaborate with a group of peers on an oral presentation designed to offer the class a coherent perspective on one of these texts. Each student will also hand in a narrative version of her part of the presentation in the form of a mini-essay.

ENG 252 - Major American Writers (3 credits)

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ENG 255 - Beyond Britain: Literature from Colonies of the British Empire (3 credits)

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ENG 260 - Reading Literature and Exploring Textuality (3 credits)

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ENG 261 - English Literature I (3 credits)

William P Shaw PhD

A survey of the most significant literary works from "Beowulf" through "Paradise Lost," highlighting such prominent authors as Chaucer, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, Milton and others. The course will chart the complex interactions between literature and the cultural changes that occurred during the more than eight hundred year period covered in this sixteen-week course.

ENG 262 - English Literature II (3 credits)

Anna Gibson

This survey of English literature begins in the 1660s and brings us to the 20th century, taking us on a journey through the poetry, fiction, drama, and prose of major British writers. Along the way we will focus our attention on four literary movements/periods: Romanticism, the Victorian era, modernism, and post-modernism. Studying works of literature in the context of these movements will allow us to listen to the writers’ conversations and disagreements across and within these literary categories and to situate these conversations within the changing landscape of British cultural history. How did literary texts respond to massive social changes such as industrialization, a growing population, the rise of cities, shifting gender roles and social classes, and two world wars? And how did these texts shape people’s experiences of such changes? How did writers across this time period offer new ways of thinking about the relationship between self and world? We will ask these questions as we read works by such central writers as Dryden, Pope, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth, Keats, Shelley, Austen, Brontë, Rossetti, Tennyson, the Brownings, Dickens, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Rhys.

ENG 265 - American Literature I (3 credits)

Anne Baker

Study of American literary texts with a particular focus on historical, cultural, and political contexts such as westward expansion and settlement, immigration, urbanization, etc. The course encourages students to think about the ways that cultural changes impact literary expression.  Authors will include Hawthorne, Irving, and Melville, among others.  Requirements include regular class participation, reading quizzes, two essays, a midterm, and a final exam.

ENG 266 - American Literature II (3 credits)

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ENG 267 - LGBTQI Literature in the U.S. (3 credits)

Chronological survey of works of literature by and about gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, questioning, and intersex communities in the U.S. Primary texts will be considered in historical, political, and literary contexts. Brief consideration of early works from colonial period and 19th century with primary focus on 20th and 21st century texts.

ENG 275 - Literature and War (3 credits)

Meredith G. Fosque

 

We will explore how people speak of, reflect on, and tell stories about war in the context of history and the evolving technology of conflict. This course looks at writings about the experience of war both historically and thematically and does so from multiple perspectives: literary, historical and technological. Issues will include the nature and purpose of war, the role of weaponry in dictating battle, the question of a just war, the theory of deterrence, and an examination of the soldier. Texts include Sun Tzu, The IliadTales of the Heike, Patrick O'Brien’s The Ionian Mission, American, British, Russian, and Japanese views of World Wars I and II, Spycraft, Holmstedt's Band of Sisters, and Shepherd’s R&R. (Assignments will include brief Responses, a Presentation, two Papers, Quizzes, Midterm, and Final.)

ENG 282 - Introduction to Film (3 credits)

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ENG 287 - Explorations in Creative Writing (3 credits)

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ENG 288 - Fiction Writing (3 credits)

Shervon Jude Cassim

This course is designed to teach the beginning writer how to write short fiction. Working under the hypothesis that the purpose of writing a short story is to manipulate the reader into seeing the world in a particular way, we will study the short story as a “device” that is constructed to accomplish that purpose.  Most of our in-class time will be spent on discussion—of published short stories, craft, and of your own short-story manuscripts. You will be using everything you learn in your own writing. By the end of the semester, you will know how to think like a writer of good short fiction and be able to take a problem-solving approach to crafting effective short fiction. You will know how to craft an effective short story, and you will have practice critiquing (constructively) your own writing and that of your classmates.

ENG 289 - Poetry Writing (3 credits)

Experience in writing poetry. Class critiquing of student work and instruction in techniques of poetry.

ENG 292 - Writing About Film (3 credits)

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ENG 298 - Special Projects in English (1-3 credits)

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300-level Courses


ENG 305 - Women and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 316 - Introduction to News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Christa Williams Gala

Learn how to write concise stories about events and people with a special focus on the tenets of media writing, including writing leads, establishing story angles, interviewing and research, quote gathering, editing and fact-checking. Students will learn the difference between writing for print and digital platforms and practice through writing their own stories, including articles and profiles. Regular quizzes on AP Style and current events will be given.

ENG 317 - Designing Web Communication (3 credits)

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ENG 323 - Writing in the Rhetorical Tradition (3 credits)

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ENG 326 - History of the English Language (3 credits)

Erik R Thomas

Prerequisite: ENG 101

ENG 326 will cover the known history that lies behind the English language, from Indo-European to the present day.  After an introduction to linguistic terminology and writing systems, the course explores Indo-European, some of the controversies surrounding it, and structures of it that are important to understanding later developments.  It then discusses Proto-Germanic and Ingvaeonic Germanic, how they relate to Indo-European and Old English, and the cultural setting associated with them.  Next, the coverage of Old English includes its linguistic structure, the Anglo-Saxon and Viking invasions, and an introduction to Old English literature.  With Middle English, the course examines the impact of the Norman invasion and other factors on the language and how English ultimately prevailed over French, accompanied by a glimpse at Middle English literature.  The Modern English period begins with the Great Vowel Shift and covers various innovations in linguistic structure, as well as the standardization of English and the development of American English.  Students also analyze a period play from late Middle or early Modern English, affording them a view of both linguistic and literary developments.

ENG 327 - Language and Gender (3 credits)

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ENG 330 - Screenwriting (3 credits)

Susan Jenny Emshwiller

Through lectures, film clips, screenplay examples, collaborative brainstorming, in-class written explorations of specific concepts, and sharing of students’ work we will explore the craft and art of screenwriting. Students will learn about structure, characterization, creating dynamic dialogue, subtext, subplots, theme, exposition, etc. utilizing established screenplay formats. The course will involve studying great films and scripts, participating in critiques, and the writing and revising of original material. Over the course, students will write scenes focusing on specific screenwriting elements, and share and critique these pieces. At the end of the semester the students should have a clear understanding of cinematic storytelling techniques and will have a work-in-progress screenplay.

ENG 331 - Communication for Engineering and Technology (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students in engineering and other technological fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. In this course, students become familiar with written communication in industrial and technical organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of technical and management readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include job application letters and resumes, progress reports, proposals, technical instructions, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 332 - Communication for Business and Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course (formerly ENG 221) is aimed primarily at students in business-, administration-, and management-related fields. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332 or ENG 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in business and public organizations. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Students practice writing tasks dealing with the routine problems and details common in a work environment and more specialized writing such as problem analyses and sales and administrative proposals. Each student also gives one or two oral presentations related to the written work.

ENG 333 - Communication for Science and Research (3 credits)

Prerequisite: Junior standing
This course is aimed primarily at students who plan careers in scientific research. Students may take only ONE of the following courses: ENG 331, ENG 332, or 333. This course introduces students to the more important forms of writing used in scientific and research environments. The course explores the relationship between research and writing in problem formulation, interpretation of results, and support and acceptance of research. Students are encouraged to adapt writing assignments to their own work experience, professional goals, and major fields of study. Instruction covers all phases of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, and critiquing other people's work). Emphasis is placed on organizing for the needs of a variety of readers; concise, clear expression; and the use of visual aids. Typical assignments include proposals, journal articles, and at least one oral presentation.

ENG 335 - Language Development (3 credits)

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ENG 342 - Literature of Space and Place (3 credits)

Rebecca Ann Walsh

How do space and place shape and reflect the complex, shifting nature of human identity? How do humans relate to nature and the environment? These have become increasingly important questions in humanities fields, which had been dominated for so long by a focus on history rather than spatiality, and which assumed that our surrounding environments were mere passive backdrops to our lives and to the way that literature makes meaning.

This course examines spatial categories--nature, the pastoral, wilderness, the city, the region, the nation--in nineteenth through twenty-first century multicultural literature, drawing upon cultural and historical geography, critical race theory, urban studies, and environmental studies. We will consider these issues through the lens of a range of different types of literary texts, such as realism, the plantation tale, modernism, postmodernism, science fiction, gothic fiction, etc. This course fulfills U.S. Diversity and Interdisciplinary Perspectives requirements.

ENG 362 - Studies in the British Novel (3 credits)

Leila S May

In this course we will explore the nineteenth-century British novel from a variety of interrelated vantage points. We will examine the conditions of production--the historical and cultural contexts--which generate these works and which they in turn participate in generating. Of particular concern will be the ways in which representations of gender, sexuality, work, class relations, and the family function in these texts, as well as the effect of narrative form and technique on these representations. The literary genres on which we will most closely focus this semester will include gothic, sensation, and fin-de-siecle ("end of the century") fiction. Novelists will include Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, M. E. Braddon, Oscar Wilde, and Bram Stoker.

ENG 374 - History of Film From 1940 (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

This course is the second in a two part series in film history. The first part of the series, ENG 364 (History of Film to 1940) explored the international history of cinema from its inception to the beginning of the sound era in the late 1920s and 1930s. This course, Film History From 1940 to the Present– is structured as a survey class covering international film movements and styles from the beginning of the late 1930s, early 1940s to the present. We will look at the tensions and confluences between discourses of aesthetics and film form, nationalism, third world and postcolonial critique, and identity politics by considering films from diverse cultural and national contexts, including, among others, British, French, Polish, and International co-productions as well as Hollywood feature films. We will also consider the politics of modes of representation in film (i.e., how do films represent history and memory, racial, national, cultural or gender identity, and what are the political implications of those representations?).

Filmmakers to be considered include Agnieszka Holland, François Truffaut, Claire Denis, Alfred Hitchcock, Quentin Tarantino, Orson Welles, Stanley Kubrick, Park Jon-wook, Milos Forman, Stephen Spielberg, Vera Chytilová, Woody Allen, Darren Aronofsky, Cristian Mungiu, Harmony Korine, Roman Polanski, Lynn Shelton, Paul Verhoeven, and others.

ENG 375 - African American Cinema (3 credits)

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ENG 376 - Science Fiction (3 credits)

Thomas P. Phillips

This section of Eng 376 examines the science fiction genre from the general standpoint of its aesthetic and thematic development as aligned with historical contexts, the latter being invariably connected to technological advances. Specifically, it will follow the genre’s ongoing fascination for and insights into the category of the human.

Assessment: class participation, two formal essays, and two exams.

ENG 377 - Fantasy (3 credits)

Brian Blackley

Representative works in the genre of fantasy from Beowulf to Bilbo Baggins. Primary focus on the heroic quest, including aspects such as the search for revelation/transformation, the demands of leadership, the value of supporting figures (the wise old man, the good mother, the helper), and the supernatural/magical as key to success in the supreme ordeal. Prior reading of works by J. R. R. Tolkien and J. K. Rowling recommended but not required. There will be two tests, a presentation, and an essay.

ENG 381 - Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Catherine A Warren

In this class, students learn to work with a genre that marries storytelling and journalism. One writer described creative nonfiction as “true stories, well told.” It is a broad genre that includes New Journalism, Literary Journalism, and Narrative Nonfiction. It includes personal essays, features, profiles, and memoir. Students will read exemplary works from Joan Didion, David Sedaris, Susan Orleans, John Edgar Wideman, Rebecca Skloot, Annie Dillard, and John McPhee, among many others. Students will also consider some of the ethics of creative nonfiction. The majority of students’ time will be spent learning the tools and techniques of immersion reporting and research and creating their own works of creative nonfiction. The class will run partly as a workshop, partly as a seminar, with outside readings, and at least two student-instructor conferences during the semester.

ENG 382 - Film and Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 388 - Intermediate Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 389 - Intermediate Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 393 - Studies in Literary Genre (3 credits)

Sujata Sudhakar Mody

Section 1- Drama in Modern India 

This course provides a focused treatment of drama in modern India as it has evolved since the late 19th century. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre, especially as an intricate weave of modern vernacular traditions with both classical Sanskrit and western dramatic traditions. After a brief introduction to the classical Sanskrit tradition as well as pre-colonial folk and devotional theater traditions, which remained central points of reference through the 19th and 20th centuries, we will move on to the main focus of the course, colonial and post-colonial theater in India. All readings are available in English translation.

 

Section 3 - Modern Hindi-Urdu Short Story

This course provides a focused treatment of the modern short story in Hindi/Urdu. We will consider the aesthetics and politics of the genre from the early twentieth century onwards. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern genre in the colonial and nationalist periods in South Asian literary history; students will also be introduced to some writing from India and Pakistan in the post-Independence era. All readings are available in English translation.

ENG 394 - Studies in World Literature (3 credits)

Nilakshi Phukan

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and above
Study of a subject in world literature: for example, African literature, Asian literature, Hispanic literature, East European literature, Comedy, the Epic, the Lyric, Autobiography, the Faust legend, or Metamorphosis. Subjects vary according to the availability of faculty. Readings in English translation.

ENG 395 - Studies in Rhetoric and Digital Media (3 credits)

Hal Meeks Jr

The Rhetoric of Design is a course which applies rhetorical analysis and critique to design artifacts and spaces. It uses the duality of visual rhetoric and design thinking to build a synthesis that will equip you will the necessary skills to make meaningful interpretations of the designed objects you encounter. To this end, much of the semester will be spent engaging with the objects, buildings and spaces we encounter every day. We read critical accounts by others of places and things far and near. We are going to do the same with what is here in our own area, applying critical thinking to what is around us. It requires stepping out of the role as a student, and into the role of a researcher. It is not just what is learned, but how it is applied.

400-level Courses


ENG 405 - Literature for Adolescents (3 credits)

This course covers the history, types, and characteristics of literature for adolescents, and emphasizes reading and analyzing the literature by exploring the themes, literary elements, challenges, and rationale for young adult literature. It addresses the ways in which this literature can be integrated and implemented in an English curriculum. Although the course is primarily designed for future and current high school English teachers, it can also be valuable for those working with adolescents in any capacity or for enhancing one's understanding of young adult literature past and present.

ENG 416 - Advanced News and Article Writing (3 credits)

Paul Christopher Isom

The purpose of the course is to prepare the student for advanced reporting in print/broadcast media. Topics can include in-depth coverage of local, state, and national government; criminal justice and the courts; business and economics; science and health matters; coverage of education, science, religion and sports. This course will seek to enhance both the student’s knowledge of these topics and the student’s ability to successfully report on them.

ENG 417 - Editorial and Opinion Writing (3 credits)

This course focuses on the expression of opinion in daily newspapers and other media. The course covers editorials (the newspaper's corporate opinion), columns (both personal and issue-oriented) and reviews (of books, film, food, etc.) There is copious writing in the course, much discussion, guest speakers and field trips. I assume students have mastered the basics of newswriting. Prerequisite is ENG 215 or permission of instructor.

ENG 422 - Writing Theory and the Writing Process (3 credits)

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ENG 425 - Analysis of Scientific and Technical Writing (3 credits)

This course examines the role of communication in the development and exchange of scientific and technical knowledge. We will first investigate how scientific writing developed as a genre from the seventeenth century to the early twentieth century. Then we will read introductory works on rhetorical theory and examine the purposes, issues, audiences, and conventions of written communication in a variety of scientific and engineering contexts. After exploring the values and purposes that shape scientific arguments, we will use these rhetorical principles and scientific values as critical frameworks for analyzing the role of communication in science and technology. Students will work on individual and team projects that involve analysis and production of scientific and technical writing.

ENG 426 - Analyzing Style (3 credits)

Helen Jane Burgess

Development of a greater understanding of and facility with style in written and electronic discourse. Theories of style, stylistic features; methods of analysis, imitation.

ENG 448 - African-American Literature (3 credits)

Survey of African-American literature and its relationships to American culture, with an emphasis on fiction and poetry since 1945. Writers such as Bontemps, Morrison, Huston, Baldwin, Hayden, Brooks, Naylor, Harper, and Dove.

ENG 465 - British Literature and the Dissolution of Empire (3 credits)

Jon F Thompson

 

British Lit Since 1945

The end of World War II also effectively signaled the end of the British Empire, which had its origins in the establishment of English plantations in Ireland in the sixteenth century. The end of empire precipitated an intense interrogation of British identity: if being British was no longer based upon being “great”—“Great Britain”—what was it based on? What did it mean to be British? Was there such a thing as a national identity at all—or did the break-up mean were there only smaller national identities like England, Scotland and Wales? While the end of empire brought about a political identity crisis, it also seemed to invigorate British literature inasmuch as the postwar years witnessed a huge upswelling of adventurous literary production, often by writers with ties to the former “colonies.” So: new voices, new forms, newly-rendered experiences, new ways of writing novels, experimentation, risk-taking, renewed interest in genre fiction and pop culture, some taboo subjects, not to mention liberal amounts of terror, pleasure, humor and the grotesque. Writers will include Graham Greene, Angela Carter, Martin Amis, Kazuo Ishiguro, Hanif Kureishi, Salman Rushdie, Peter Riley, Ian McEwan, Pat Barker, Penelope Fitzgerald, Ted Hughes and Martin Anderson. There will be a midterm and a final exam and two out-of-class essays.

ENG 486 - Shakespeare, The Earlier Plays (3 credits)

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ENG 488 - Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 489 - Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 490 - Studies in Medieval Literature (3 credits)

Timothy Linwood Stinson

This course examines monsters from the classical and medieval eras as depicted in medieval art and literature. The medieval imagination gave rise and form to a vivid pantheon of mythological creatures, including ogres, trolls, elves, and faeries, whose popularity remains unabated in contemporary literature and film. Our survey will include familiar monsters such as werewolves, dragons, and minotaurs, as well as a host of exotic monsters seldom encountered today, including dog-headed men (canocephali) and one-footed monopods. We will consider how medieval monsters represented marginalized groups, including non-Christian and non-European others, as well as how they addressed and embodied the deepest human anxieties over death and the afterlife, the boundaries of the human and animal, and human bodies and sexuality.

ENG 491 - Honors in English (3 credits)

Anna Gibson

Serials and Storylines

Ours is a culture of serial storytelling. Whether it’s the television shows we’re hooked on, the podcasts we listen to, the interactive video games we immerse ourselves in, or the book series we love, so many of the stories we enjoy today are told in parts. But how do we approach these serial texts as literary critics when we are so used to discussing texts as “whole” forms? In this class we will take up this and other questions related to seriality by investigating the history and conventions of serial and multiplot storytelling. We will spend most of our time in the heyday of serial fiction: the Victorian era. But we’ll journey all the way back to early story cycles like One Thousand and One Nights, in which sequential storytelling is nothing short of life-saving, and we’ll finish in the present moment with television shows, podcasts, and a contemporary multi-plot novel that examines the strange sequences and patterns that structure our world (David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas). Along the way, you will experience what it was like to be a Victorian reader consuming one of the most popular serial detective novels of the day, Mary Elizabeth Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret, in parts over many weeks. We will spend some time with the most famous serial novelist, Charles Dickens, by reading his masterpiece Bleak House alongside the notes he kept for himself as he wrote the novel over 19 months. You will contribute to an ongoing digital research project on Dickens’s working notes by making your own set of annotations on a single serial installment, and you will work with a small group to create a project on a popular serial narrative (television show, podcast, film series, book series, graphic novel, video game) of your choice.

Questions we will be asking this semester might include: How do the plots and parts of serial stories relate to one another and to the notion of a “whole text”? What role do theories of reading and technologies of production play in the history of serial storytelling? What is the relationship between serial storytelling and the history of mystery and detection as genres? Do our theories of serial narrative change when we move from one medium (e.g. serial story) to another (e.g. television series)? What can attention to seriality teach us about narrative form in general?

ENG 492 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (3 credits)

Ora Gelley

Autobiography and Documentary Film: Aesthestics and Ethics

First person filmmaking encompasses documentary work and autobiography writing in which the director/writer is a distinct presence, whether through first-person narration, appearing on camera (in film and/or video, television), or through other singular marks of point of view or first person narration. Under this rubric falls the memoir (e.g., Art Spiegelman, Marjane Satrapi, and Phoebe Gloeckner), essay film, autobiographical documentary, diaries and travelogues, creative reenactments of lived experience, and live performance. In this course we will look at examples of all these forms, paying close attention to formal strategies particular to each. The course is roughly divided into 3 parts: documentaries and films about others; documentaries and films about selves; and documentaries and films about nature and the environment. Throughout the semester, we will consider the question of how and why documentaries/memoirs construct knowledge about the self, others, and the world we all share.

Filmmakers and authors covered in this class may include Raoul Peck (Am Not Your Negro); Kirsten Johnson (Cameraperson, 2016); Beyoncé (Lemonade); Shirley Clarke (Portrait of Jason, 1967); Jim McBride (David Holzman's Diary, 1967); Robert Greene (Kate Plays Christine, 2015); Antonio Campos (Christine, 2016);  Werner Herzog (Grizzly Man, 2005 and Lo and Behold:  Reveries of the Connected World, 2016); Doug Block (The Kids Grow Up, 2009); Phoebe Gloeckner (The Diary of a Teenage Girl: An Account in Words and Pictures, 2002);  Robert Frank (Don't Blink, 2015); Sarah Polley (Stories We Tell, 2013); Lucien Castaing-Taylor and Ilisa Barbash (Sweetgrass, 2010),  among  others.

Josie Torres Barth

Media Fantasies in Film 

Popular media and their technologies of exhibition and consumption shape our daily experience, our connections to others, and our relationship to the world both inside and outside our homes. In this course, we will examine how film and media texts from the 20th and 21st centuries represent their own medium and new, competing technologies. We will trace the evolving experience of new media as forms of virtual experience, from early film to contemporary reality-based and social media, and draw connections across historical periods. What new forms of perception and connection did these media make possible? What kinds of metaphors did people use to understand these new experiences? How did these developments change people’s relationship to space and to each other? What kinds of fantasies and fears did they provoke? We will trace shifts in exhibition and consumption practices, starting with the private experience of in-home entertainment provided by radio and TV—which promise unprecedented connection and simultaneous experience, but also open the home to threats from the outside world. We will examine how competing utopian and dystopian discourses surrounding new media technologies reflect changing conceptions of race, class, and gender, and how various media represent—and create—their own forms of reality. Throughout the course, we will pay special attention to the shifting relationships between the individual, the home, and the public sphere, as popular media’s address becomes both more mobile and more private.

Film and media texts may include Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), Singin' in the Rain (1952), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Real Life (1979), Unfriended (2014), Her (2013), and Eighth Grade (2018), as well as selected early short films, radio plays, episodes of TV programs such as The Twilight Zone and Black Mirror, and narrative podcasts.

ENG 495 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

W J Miller

Langston Hughes: From Popular Culture to the Civil Rights Movement

Langston Hughes (1901-1967) absorbed and shaped popular culture noting that his greatest source of inspiration was listening to (or reading) the news.  In shaping both Harlem’s values and the social turmoil of the 1960s, this seminar reassess this writer whose career merely begins with his role as a leading figure of the New Negro Movement of the 1920s.

Accessing numerous primary sources as well as engaging with extensive works from Hughes’s seventeen-volume oeuvre, this course examines Hughes’s use of popular blues and jazz music to shape the rhythms and cadence of his innovative poetry.  Despite (or perhaps because of?) their blues influence, many of Hughes’s poems read like rehearsals for social change. We will then continue on through his dramatic works, track his influence on Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun (1959), and move into his weekly newspaper columns written for the Chicago Defender from 1942-62. Final projects for this course might explore such questions as What role did communism play in the life of this writer who was forced to testify on television before Joseph McCarthy in 1953 at the height of the Red Scare? Of special note, this seminar begins and ends with extended exploration into the previously unidentified role Hughes’s poetry played in the Civil Rights Movement and its direct inspiration on the nation’s most visible dreamer— Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

ENG 498 - Special Topics in English (1-6 credits)

Jason Swarts PhD

Help in a Networked Age

 

The nature of computer-supported work has changed substantially over the decades, from a model focused on individuals working alone, at simple tasks, within singular software applications to a networked model in which people work collaboratively, on complex tasks, across sprawling infrastructures of hardware and software. Never before have users needed more support but done less to seek it out, at least in traditional sources. Computer documentation, as we know it, softbound volumes that delineate tasks and steps, has become antiquated. It addresses tasks and problems that are too simple, delivers help in forms that are too limiting, and updates at speeds that are too glacial. Recognizing these shortcomings, users are turning more toward crowd-based solutions like wikis, forums, and video clearinghouses, effectively elevating the importance of emergent, need-driven amateur help documentation. In light of these developments, technical communicators rightly wonder what has happened to their professional roles. They aren't vanishing but they are changing. This course will examine those changes and help students develop skills that are better suited to producing and managing new forms of documentation that include video, wiki knowledge bases, and community forums. Students will learn to produce the kind of living documentation that users are turning to and come to understand the technical communicator's new role as a curator or manager of that information

500-level Courses


ENG 505 - Writing Program Administration: Theory, Practice, and Research (3 credits)

Christopher M Anson

Almost everyone who earns a post-graduate degree in writing or communication studies and pursues a career in higher education will at some point be involved in the administration of a writing program, writing center, or writing- or communication-across-the-curriculum effort, and many will become its director. Yet graduate curricula seldom focus on the complex theoretical, pedagogical, political, and managerial dimensions of such work, leaving the new WPA or future writing department chair at the mercy of inherited practice—and much trial and error.

This course is designed to focus on current theories, research, and practices of writing program administration, including curricular design and assessment, faculty development, assessment of student achievement, budget oversight, the politics of administration in higher education, and historical studies of writing program administration. The course is designed for all interested MA and PhD students, but will be particularly valuable for those considering administrative work in first-year writing programs, writing centers, or WAC/CAC programs at a range of institutions (community colleges, small liberal arts colleges, and large research universities). Those with other higher-education interests may also find the administrative focus useful for career enhancement and job preparation.

Note: This course was originally listed as ENG 583/798, but it has been approved as a permanent course offering and the number has changed to 505. This will not affect registration.

ENG 511 - Theory and Research In Composition (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 515 - Rhetoric Of Science and Technology (3 credits)

Stacey L Pigg

ENG 515 introduces rhetorical theory and analysis as lenses for understanding how scientific and technical language and artifacts are invented, circulated, and transformed. Rhetorical theory and analysis are useful for understanding and producing technical and scientific communication directed to expert audiences, such as what you might encounter in journal articles or patents. However, it is also useful for understanding how scientific and technical discourse reaches and engages (or fails to engage) publics. The course will examine and apply vocabulary, analytical processes, and conventions of argument from rhetorical theory to scientific and technological issues and workplaces. The goal of learning about these rhetorical theories and practices is to provide frameworks for making purposeful decisions for how to take action with science and technology in public, professional, and personal life.

ENG 518 - Publication Management for Technical Communicators (3 credits)

Advanced study of project and personnel management issues as they relate to technical communication. Includes such topics as scheduling, estimating, budgeting, usability testing, staffing, performance evaluation, motivation, subcontracting, and ethics. For students planning careers as technical communicators, or for others managing groups involved in information development.

ENG 522 - Writing in Nonacademic Settings (3 credits)

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ENG 523 - Language Variation Research Seminar (3 credits)

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ENG 530 - 17th-Century English Literature (3 credits)

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ENG 536 - Research Methods in Phonology (3 credits)

This course explores laboratory and computational tools for investigating linguistic sound systems. By the end of the semester, students should (1) understand some of the main issues of modern phonological theory, including phonological typology and the concept of phonetic naturalness, (2) know how to use laboratory techniques for studying language and speech, such as acoustic analysis of speech corpora, ultrasound imaging of the tongue, electroglottography, aerodynamic measurement, and perception experiments, and (3) have working knowledge of computational tools involved in collecting and analyzing phonetic data, including phonological databases, forced alignment, scripting in Praat, Python, R, and/or Matlab, and some Linux commands.

ENG 539 - Seminar In World Literature (3 credits)

Miriam E Orr

Seminar in World Literature: Human Rights and World Literature

This course will focus on literary narratives (fiction and nonfiction) from a number of global locations to help us understand human rights, justice, and ethics. What does it mean not to have access to education, health care, free speech, reproductive freedom, freedom from violence, for example? Students will have an opportunity to help shape the course by making presentations on the historical and cultural contexts for and critical responses to the books we read.

Reading list will include writers such as Bessie Head, J.M. Coetzee, James Dawes, Louise Erdrich, Jenny Erpenbeck, Ta-Nahisi Coates, Leslea Newman, Ursula LeGuin, Jose Saramago, and Ken Saro-Wiwa, among others.

ENG 550 - English Romantic Period (3 credits)

A comprehensive, advanced introduction to the groundbreaking literature in Britain from 1785-1825. Emphasis on representative poetry of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, with selected readings from other poets, prose writers, and dramatists of the period. Primary readings are balanced with critical essays from various journals to represent current topics of interest to scholars in America and Britain. Papers and oral presentation/teaching practice. Fulfills later British literature requirement.

ENG 554 - Contemporary Rhetorical Theory (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 581 - Visual Rhetoric: Theory and Criticism (3 credits)

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ENG 582 - Studies in Literature (3 credits)

Anne Baker

The Nineteenth-Century Novel

In this course we will read and discuss eight to nine novels published in the U.S. between the beginning of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth.  Major topics to be addressed over the course of the semester will include competing visions of American national identity, the split between highbrow and lowbrow or popular culture that emerges powerfully during this period, how controversies over race and slavery shaped the production of novels, and the way novels reflect controversies over changing gender roles in nineteenth-century culture.  Authors will include Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Twain, H. James, Howells, and Wharton.

W J Miller

Langston Hughes: From Popular Culture to the Civil Rights Movement

Langston Hughes (1901-1967) consistently noted that his greatest source of inspiration was listening to (or reading) the news.  In shaping both Harlem’s values and the social turmoil of the 1960s, this seminar reassess this writer whose career merely begins with his role as a leading poet of the New Negro Movement of the 1920s.

After engaging with extensive works from Hughes’s seventeen-volume oeuvre, this course directs students into the archival realm of primary sources.  Music shaped the rhythms and cadence of a new innovative genre created solely by Hughes that David Chintz has rightly labeled “Blues Poetry.”  Through regular student presentations, we will examine Hughes’s dramatic works, track his influence on Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin in the Sun (1959), and move into his weekly newspaper columns written for the Chicago Defender from 1942-62. Final papers for this course might explore such questions as How does literature serve as a rehearsal for social change? or What role did communism play in the life of this writer who was forced to testify on television before Joseph McCarthy in 1953 at the height of the Red Scare? Of special note, this seminar begins and ends with extended exploration into the newly identified role Hughes’s poetry played in the Civil Rights Movement and its direct inspiration on the nation’s most visible dreamer— Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

ENG 585 - Studies In Film (3 credits)

Franklin D Cason

ENG 585: Studies in Film/Media Style and Authorship

Dr. Franklin Cason


Theories of authorship continue to generate heated debates. This course will consider both the historical and contemporary debates around the controversial notion of authorship as it relates to the notions of signature and style. Drawing on debates in film and media theory, literary theory, and philosophy, we will examine how artists as varied as Alfred Hitchcock, Chantal Akerman, Jean-Luc Godard, Wes Anderson, Nadine Labaki, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, and Marguerite Duras explore and challenge the romantic conflation of the author as stylistic innovator, site of influence, collaborator, and iconoclast. Some of the scholars and theorists considered include: Roland Barthes, Wayne Booth, Richard Dyer, Michel Foucault, Claire Johnston, Lev Manovich, Judith Mayne, Alina Ng, Andrew Sarris, Paul Sellors, Janet Staiger, Francois Truffaut, and Patricia White. Throughout the semester we will ask: what is the impact of stylistic innovation in media culture? And, why does an author matter? Students will write a substantial research paper.

ENG 587 - Interdisciplinary Studies in English (3 credits)

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ENG 588 - Fiction Writing Workshop (3 credits)

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ENG 589 - Poetry Writing Workshop (3 credits)

Dorianne Louise Laux

This critique workshop will focus on works in progress, giving special attention to creating new work through exercises gleaned from model poems.  Submitted work will be discussed with an eye toward various modes of revision.  We will read single collections of contemporary poems, mostly early books or books that established the poet, as a way to begin thinking about the compilation of a manuscript. Students will choose one poem from among the course offerings for memorization and recitation and write at least one imitation. Interviews, essays, audio and video recordings and biographical works may be reviewed as well. The class may also enjoy a visit from a guest poet. The course stresses reading as a writer.  For graduate students or advanced students with instructor’s permission. 

ENG 590 - Studies In Creative Writing (3 credits)

Visit the NC State University online course catalog for the general course description for this course

ENG 592 - Special Topics in Film Styles and Genres (1-6 credits)

Josie Torres Barth

Media Fantasies in Film 

Popular media and their technologies of exhibition and consumption shape our daily experience, our connections to others, and our relationship to the world both inside and outside our homes. In this course, we will examine how film and media texts from the 20th and 21st centuries represent their own medium and new, competing technologies. We will trace the evolving experience of new media as forms of virtual experience, from early film to contemporary reality-based and social media, and draw connections across historical periods. What new forms of perception and connection did these media make possible? What kinds of metaphors did people use to understand these new experiences? How did these developments change people’s relationship to space and to each other? What kinds of fantasies and fears did they provoke? We will trace shifts in exhibition and consumption practices, starting with the private experience of in-home entertainment provided by radio and TV—which promise unprecedented connection and simultaneous experience, but also open the home to threats from the outside world. We will examine how competing utopian and dystopian discourses surrounding new media technologies reflect changing conceptions of race, class, and gender, and how various media represent—and create—their own forms of reality. Throughout the course, we will pay special attention to the shifting relationships between the individual, the home, and the public sphere, as popular media’s address becomes both more mobile and more private.

Film and media texts may include Sorry, Wrong Number (1948), Singin' in the Rain (1952), A Face in the Crowd (1957), Real Life (1979), Unfriended (2014), Her (2013), and Eighth Grade (2018), as well as selected early short films, radio plays, episodes of TV programs such as The Twilight Zone and Black Mirror, and narrative podcasts. 

600-level Courses


ENG 676 - Master's Project in English (3 credits)

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ENG 685 - Master's Supervised Teaching (1-3 credits)

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ENG 688 - Non-Thesis Masters Continuous Registration - Half Time Registration (1 credit)

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700-level Courses


ENG 798 - Special Topics in English Studies (3-6 credits)

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CRD

700-level Courses


CRD 790 - ( credits)

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800-level Courses


CRD 885 - Doctoral Supervised Teaching (1-3 credits)

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CRD 890 - Doctoral Preliminary Exam (1-9 credits)

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CRD 893 - Doctoral Supervised Research (1-9 credits)

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HON

200-level Courses


HON 202 - Inquiry, Discovery, and Literature (3 credits)

Catherine Mary Mainland

HON 202: The Art of War

Whether nations win or lose, war has always left its mark on the arts. This course will take a comparative look at artistic responses to the American Civil War, the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, the Korean and Vietnam Wars, and modern military campaigns. Through our examination of the history and social psychology of war, we will pay constant attention to the infinitely human urge to use art to deal with the inhumane, comedy to combat tragedy, and story-telling to work through feelings of guilt, loss, inadequacy, or doubt. With readings of poetry, drama, and prose from the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries, and works ranging from cinema and television to video games, we will explore the ways in which humans deal with wars and their aftermath by placing them (safely?) in the artistic realm.

We will study works such as: Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn; Bierce, “Chickamauga”; Howells, “Editha”; British poetry of WWI; Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front; Camus, The Plague; M*A*S*H* selected episodes; The Producers (1968); O'Brien, The Things They Carried; and paintings and posters related to the wars we will discuss.

HON 293 - ( credits)

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HON 296 - ( credits)

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HON 297 - Honors Special Topics - Interdisciplinary Perspectives/US Diversity (3 credits)

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HON 298 - Honors Research/Independent Study (1-3 credits)

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300-level Courses


HON 313 - Reading Machines (3 credits)

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HON 395 - Honors Cooperative Education (3 credits)

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HON 397 - Honors Extension and Engagement (1-6 credits)

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400-level Courses


HON 498 - Honors Research/Creative Project 1 (3 credits)

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HON 499 - Honors Research/Creative Project 2 (3 credits)

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